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Classical - Released July 19, 2019 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Ah yes, glissandos galore! How we have missed them. While it sometimes seems as though every contemporary conductor, both young and old, feels obliged to bring their own ideas to Mahler’s work, Vladimir Jurowski, already a highly-distinguished conductor who has often explored the works of the “Czech” composer (Symphony No. 1, Symphony No. 2, Totenfeier), is not afraid of relying on expressive phrases that seem somewhat questionable today. It is strange, because such joy, performed with such style, is hard to resist... And what a Ruhevoll he delivers on this album! Jurowski continues his Mahlerian journey here with Symphony No. 4. He offers a completely original touch, mingling influences from Dvořák and Janáček with those of Bruckner and Strauss. Is this what Mahler would have wanted? In any case, he is modern precisely for that reason, and Jurowski knows it. It all seems like a game to him. Don’t bother looking for the ethereal (found in Abbado’s interpretation) or eternity (Haitink). Instead, the flutes gargle, the clarinets growl, the bassoons blush, the timpani roar, and above all this bohemian commotion, the violins sing with their “pricking” technique. The fluctuating poetics of Bedächtig have rarely sounded so alive, natural or radiant. The scordatura of the second movement conjures up an image of hell, acting as an appetiser for the Burleske from the Ninth. Finally, the horn continues resounding and, even in the middle of hell, lyricism triumphs. In the final lied (Sehr behaglich), Sofia Fomina, with her perfect voice, performs a light dance with a childish spirit that transcends the lyrics “No music on earth is comparable to ours” (Kein’ Musik ist ja nicht auf Erden die unsrer verglichen kann werden). It begs the question: were Seefried and Walter the inspiration for this enchanting interpretation by Jurowski? And when will Symphony No. 6 be released?! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released July 12, 2019 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Mozart was a master at capturing the spirits of the instruments for which he wrote, perfectly exemplified here in the lighter-than-air Flute Concerto No. 2, the sprightly and playful Bassoon Concerto and in the interplay of the four soloists in the Sinfonia concertante. These three exceptional works come to life in this studio recording with soloists of the London Philharmonic Orchestra and Principal conductor Vladimir Jurowski. © LPO Live
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Classical - Released October 1, 2010 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released May 1, 2015 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released April 1, 2017 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released April 1, 2007 | Lyrita

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Essential for any collection of twentieth century English music, this disc contains the four extant orchestral works of George Butterworth -- his Two English Idylls, The Banks of Green Willow, and A "Shropshire Lad" Rhapsody -- in performances by Adrian Boult and the London Philharmonic Orchestra of such complete conviction and deep affection that they might well be dubbed definitive. Boult attended the premiere of A "Shropshire Lad" Rhapsody in 1913 and gave the premiere of The Banks of Green Willow the following year at his first public appearance as a professional conductor, and his understanding of and sympathy for Butterworth's achingly sensual and poignantly nostalgic music is absolute and unwavering. Anyone who wants to know where Vaughan Williams came from and what Delius might have been should hear this music in these performances. And that's just the first 23 minutes. After Butterworth comes Peter Warlock's half-contented, half-sad An Old Song from 1917 and Patrick Hadley's robustly passionate One Morning in Spring from 1942 followed by a set of four short orchestral pieces by Herbert Howells. The earliest -- the moving Elegy for viola, string quartet, and string orchestra from 1916 written for a friend's death in the Great War -- invokes the solemn sound world of Vaughan Williams' Tallis Fantasia. Next, the rambunctious Merry-Eye from 1920 has the joie de vivre of a man on his honeymoon -- which, in fact, Howells was. The atmospheric Procession from 1922 has a crescendo-decrescendo structure recalling Borodin's In the Steppes of Central Asia. The festive Music for a Prince from 1948 written for the birth of Prince Charles has the good cheer of an Englishman celebrating the monarchy honeymoon -- which, in fact, Howells was. In every work from Butterworth through Howells, Boult and the London Philharmonic give the music their all -- except in Merry-Eye, Elegy, and Music for a Prince, where Boult and the New Philharmonia give their all instead. Throughout, Lyrita's cool, clean, and vivid stereo sound puts the listener in the hall with the performers. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 1, 2012 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released April 1, 2015 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released December 1, 2018 | Lyrita

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Classical - Released January 1, 1992 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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From it's opening notes, to it's final closing breaths, the spirit of revolution is infused into the fabric of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony. Completed in 1957, it remembers the failed uprising of 1905 and hints at Hungary's anti-Soviet rebellion of 1956. Through his powerful, and at times unsettling music, Shostakovich celebrates the revolutionary spirit and offers a cautionary tale about the dangers of complete power. The London Philharmonic Orchestra harnesses the dark intensity and emotion of his writing in this live performance under Principal Conductor Vladimir Jurowski. © LPO Live
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Classical - Released March 1, 2015 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released December 1, 2018 | Lyrita

Before Vernon Handley and Bryden Thomson's digital cycles of the complete symphonies of Arnold Bax, there were only single symphonies in scattered stereo releases. Arguably the best of these were issued by Lyrita, and arguably the best of those are coupled on this reissue: a 1970 Second Symphony with Myer Fredman conducting the London Philharmonic and a 1971 Fifth with Raymond Leppard leading the same orchestra. This argument rests partly on the quality of the pieces. All Bax's symphonies have heroic themes scored in brazen colors, but his 1926 Second has the most cogently reasoned developments and his 1932 Fifth has the most powerful rhetoric plus the most emotionally satisfying Epilogue. But in the end it's the quality of the performances that make the case for the music. A student of Adrian Boult and an assistant to Otto Klemperer, Fredman brings a strong technique and a firm sense of pacing to the Second's epic narrative arch. Leppard later did excellent work with the English Chamber Orchestra, but his youthful recordings in the British orchestral repertoire were especially heartfelt, and his Fifth is both tightly controlled and lyrically affecting, particularly in the Epilogue. The London Philharmonic plays with skill and professionalism, but with perhaps more dedication than it brought to its contemporary recordings of Brahms and Beethoven. Recorded in the Walthamstow Assembly Hall in London, Lyrita's stereo sound is big, clear, and deep, with a tangible sense of time and place. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1971 | Westminster

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 1, 2015 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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