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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 9, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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After the consecration, it's time for some recreation. Logic rounded off 2017 with an authoritative statement of the same stature as Everybody, his third gold record in a row. Almost without fanfare, the Maryland rapper brought out the immensely successful 1-800-273-8255 with its commentary on the younger generation's suicidal tendencies. The whole album aims to be a wake-up call for society, an artistic response from the middle class to the violence of Trump's election. On Bobby Valentino, the second volume in his series of mixtapes, the direction is very different. The introduction sets the tone with Rick & Morty, characters from a sci-fi cartoon series, debating on the feeling of ennui they get from listening to Logic's music. This offbeat humour is present throughout the project, with liberating gags and lyrical puns. Where Everybody, had Logic in the role of the politically-aware orator, here he has deconstructed his thinking, giving it a mischievous edge without spilling over into provocation. Flanked by his producer 6ix, Logic is making conscious music which still stays out in front of contemporary sounds. Indeed, that's often exactly what he is criticised for: lacking identity of his own and taking the fire of Kendrick Lamar or Drake's entrancing melodies. But taken as a whole, the rapper's productions always represent perfectly-judged surgical strikes. Take, for example, the brilliantly made 44 more, a kind of CV: a 44-bar couplet that showcases Logic's utterly versatile skill. And don't forget Indica Badu, his sweet collaboration with the underrated Wiz Khalifa, who is always up for this type of adventure with Bobby Tarantino II, and Logic gives him permission to cut loose, revealing a more hedonistic side of his personality. This little break is the best entry point to learn to love his music, which remains little-known on this side of the Atlantic. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 5, 2017 | Def Jam Recordings

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There's a lot happening on Logic's third proper Def Jam album. Central is an adaptation of Andy Weir's The Egg, a short story in which a didactic God (portrayed here by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson) and a stupefied man (played by DJ Big Von) discuss, after the latter's tragic death, reincarnation and the meaning of life. The dialogue begins at the end of the opener, continues as the entirety of the five-minute ninth track, and concludes in the message-filled finale. Without it, there's still well over an hour of music, enough to accommodate a multitude of perspectives and themes from the affably verbose Logic, who still seems to enjoy rapping as much as John Legend does singing. Keeping track of whether Logic's writing from his own or someone else's vantage can be a challenge, but one doesn't need to be that familiar with his work to realize that this contains some of his most personal rhymes. The tone is set early when he declares "Music is made to assimilate," after which he examines what does the opposite. All the while, he details various prejudices he has faced as a light-skinned biracial man, down to the assumption that he must have had it easy despite being born to drug-addicted parents and raised in a violent household with a racist mother who called him the n-word (the six-letter version). The production, handled by 6ix and Logic with a handful of assists, ensures that the album doesn't get mired in concepts and turn into a Saturday Night Live student theater showcase skit. The majority of the tracks are uptempo and tend to change shape as they play out, generally switching between gnashing breakbeats and snaking trap beats with slightly woozy atmospheric touches. Most compelling of the stylistic diversions occurs in "1-800-273-8255," a modern orchestral pop number titled after the number for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, and the sonically and lyrically connected "Anziety," where Logic details his struggles with (and positive spin on) anxiety. Out of the dozen listed features, Killer Mike takes the prize for his blazing polemic addressed to God. The booklet also acknowledges Weir, though pre-808s Kanye West, post-Section.80 Kendrick Lamar, and Chance the Rapper continue to loom large in Logic and 6ix's approach to making panoramic rap albums. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 28, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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From the start of YSIV Logic's ambition is clear: to return to the style and energy of 90s boom-bap, redefining the contours of the genre as he sees fit. This fourth edition of the Young Sinatra project sees the rapper paying homage to some of his idols. Kanye West is often there in the background, for example on a very personal and touching version of Last Call. Logic also evokes Nas and Big L on a more cinematic Street Dreams 2. Still produced in large by 6ix, the album's broad scope teems with ideas. Even the smallest detail is a cultural reference to an era, or a state of mind. Logic has fun with the iconic breakbeat of Apache, enjoying funky go-go infused exchanges with Wale on 100 Miles and Running, a reference to a legendary NWA track. Later on the rapper shows some great technique alongside Jaden Smith on ICONIC, like a flashback to Busta Rhymes and Eminem with the son of the Prince of Bel Air. The high-point of this updated boom-bap album has to be Wu Tang Forever, a ‘tour de force’ where Logic reunites the original Wu Tang line-up. In spite of the absence of Old Dirty Bastard, this track has the power of an enthusiastic and spontaneous rap record, the sort Logic takes a lot of inspiration from. With powerful moments of introspection and more playful passages, Logic proves that he is now perfectly able to integrate his influences and make them modern and relevant. A perfect transition album. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 29, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 9, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 2, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 28, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 13, 2015 | Def Jam Recordings

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With a story that takes place 100 years in the future, Logic's sophomore LP is also a concept album, and with the Gaithersburg, Maryland MC's vibrant, ambitious debut providing evidence the young artist could do it, it doesn't take long for The Incredible True Story to live up to its title. The "true" bit comes from the album's honest yet uplifting message, as early highlight "Fade Away" gives up "Everybody's gonna die, gonna go one day/Maybe it'll happen on a Monday, drop in to work and get hit by a Hyundai," as that flippant wisdom is delivered with Logic's usual breakneck speed. As fast as he raps, it's arguable that the musical ideas come even faster, with the flute-driven "Like Woah" reimagining hip-hop in the age of hippies and flower power, while highlight "Young Jesus" kicks with the old-school boom-bap from 6ix and Sir Dylan, as this clever devil MC gets in the Eminem spirit with "Eat whack MCs like Hannibal/Cause Joe Pesci's my spirit animal." Much of the album comes off as a De La Soul-like kaleidoscope with that OutKast attitude of anything goes, and then cuts like "Lord Willin'" and "Paradise" with Jesse Boykins III offer something new, with a small funk band formation delivering music that could easily be reproduced on-stage. This kinetic album can get flashy, and the sci-fi interludes grow as big as a Michael Bay movie, yet it is anchored by the more thoughtful numbers, like the wise "Never Been" ("You gotta climb over your ego to master your will") and the overwhelming title cut, where Logic delivers a stream of consciousness looking back at his life and in a style somewhere between Kendrick Lamar and a jazz singer. The guest list is lean plus the production is mostly from in-house folks like 6ix, DJ Khalil, and Logic himself, and the whole experience is like Prince in his heyday, where a creative force and a tight-knit crew create something startling and fully formed. An outward-aimed Drake is another comparison, based on style and swagger, but like the album's intro says as it captures two future cosmonauts going through music from 2015, this is the album where it all changed, as the one they call Young Sinatra comes into his own and proves his nearly perfect debut was no isolated fluke. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 13, 2017 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 24, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 21, 2014 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 21, 2017 | Skyrocket Media

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 1, 2016 | Def Jam Recordings

After topping the R&B/Hip-Hop charts in 2015 with his sci-fi concept sophomore album, The Incredible True Story, Logic returned the following year with his fifth mixtape, Bobby Tarantino. His seventh release in as many years and fifth mixtape overall, Bobby Tarantino arrived unexpectedly in July on Def Jam/Visionary Music Group. Even without prior notice, it debuted at number 16 on the Billboard 200. Featuring "Flexicution," his first Billboard Hot 100 solo single, the mixtape also featured spots by Pusha T ("Wrist"), Juicy J ("Super Mario World"), and vocals from Jessica Andren, John Lindahl, and George DeNoto. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 13, 2015 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 21, 2014 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 27, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 7, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 5, 2017 | Def Jam Recordings

There's a lot happening on Logic's third proper Def Jam album. Central is an adaptation of Andy Weir's The Egg, a short story in which a didactic God (portrayed here by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson) and a stupefied man (played by DJ Big Von) discuss, after the latter's tragic death, reincarnation and the meaning of life. The dialogue begins at the end of the opener, continues as the entirety of the five-minute ninth track, and concludes in the message-filled finale. Without it, there's still well over an hour of music, enough to accommodate a multitude of perspectives and themes from the affably verbose Logic, who still seems to enjoy rapping as much as John Legend does singing. Keeping track of whether Logic's writing from his own or someone else's vantage can be a challenge, but one doesn't need to be that familiar with his work to realize that this contains some of his most personal rhymes. The tone is set early when he declares "Music is made to assimilate," after which he examines what does the opposite. All the while, he details various prejudices he has faced as a light-skinned biracial man, down to the assumption that he must have had it easy despite being born to drug-addicted parents and raised in a violent household with a racist mother who called him the n-word (the six-letter version). The production, handled by 6ix and Logic with a handful of assists, ensures that the album doesn't get mired in concepts and turn into a Saturday Night Live student theater showcase skit. The majority of the tracks are uptempo and tend to change shape as they play out, generally switching between gnashing breakbeats and snaking trap beats with slightly woozy atmospheric touches. Most compelling of the stylistic diversions occurs in "1-800-273-8255," a modern orchestral pop number titled after the number for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, and the sonically and lyrically connected "Anziety," where Logic details his struggles with (and positive spin on) anxiety. Out of the dozen listed features, Killer Mike takes the prize for his blazing polemic addressed to God. The booklet also acknowledges Weir, though pre-808s Kanye West, post-Section.80 Kendrick Lamar, and Chance the Rapper continue to loom large in Logic and 6ix's approach to making panoramic rap albums. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 21, 2014 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 14, 2016 | Def Jam Recordings

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