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Rock - Released September 17, 2021 | Reprise

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It is positively spooky how consistently interesting Lindsey Buckingham's 30-year solo career has been. For a musician whose core creative philosophy seems rooted in the way art emerges from dramatic chaos, his own output—both within and without Fleetwood Mac—always manages to be immediately familiar and completely surprising. And although it's been ten years since his last proper solo album, his 2017 collaboration with Christine McVie (featuring Mick Fleetwood and John McVie) felt more like "Buckingham with guests" than the "Fleetwood Mac without Stevie Nicks" album the lineup suggested, as it leaned heavily on Buckingham's unique vocal and guitar phrasings. However, when confronted with a true Lindsey Buckingham solo effort—as in, "written, performed, and produced by"—it's abundantly clear just how differently he thinks when left to his own devices. For a man who turns 72 in October, 2021, and is among the most famous rock musicians alive, it's remarkable just how weird and fearless he still is. The tenor and textures here are uniquely his, as is the distinct approach to multi-tracked self-harmonies, drum machine programming, and slightly off-kilter layers of instrumentation that evoke a mood that somehow is both claustrophobic and exploratory. It's an "in-the-box" sound that's less rock-oriented than 2011's Seeds We Sow (Buckingham calls it "pop," but it most definitely is not, despite how catchy some of the tunes are here), and more aligned with the coke-sheen new wave he was making on Mirage and Law and Order in the early '80s. And while a cut like "Blind Love" blatantly revisits the drum pattern of "Trouble," Buckingham has reconfigured the approach into something stranger and much more introspective here. Frenetic harmonies and digidrum patterns on a track like "Swan Song" show an artist in anxious conversation with himself. Some may be a bit disappointed that there's not a tremendous amount of guitar here, but when it does show up, it's mightily impressive; Buckingham flexes his fingerpicking skills on the glitchy and melodic "I Don't Mind" and the, er, electric "Power Down," both brisk reminders of what an underrated and unique player he is. Of course, it's not the '80s anymore, and for an artist exiled from the band that made him famous and looking at his eighth decade on the planet, it's probably not surprising that the lyrics here can get a little melancholy. "On the Wrong Side" is an explicit exploration of old age, but in typical Buckingham fashion, it's a bit askew and maybe a little cynical, while the more direct and melancholy "Dancing," closes the album out on a somber note of poetic reflection. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 5, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

In the big family of great guitarists names such as Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Frank Zappa are always on the tip of the tongue. But Lindsey Buckingham, formerly of Fleetwood Mac, certainly merits a place in this hall of fame. Now 69 years old, the three-time Grammy winner built up a big fanbase in the 1970s and 1980s but has also had a very full career since. Buckingham has six studio albums to his name, three live albums and one record which he made with Christine McVie of Fleetwood Mac. Solo Anthology: The Best Of Lindsey Buckingham clocks in at over three hours long and is made up, for the most part, of the artist's original tracks. It's a kind of vast résumé of his career including live and alternative takes of tracks from albums such as Law And Order, Go Insane and Out Of The Cradle, but also his collaborations with McVie on the 2017 album Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie. Buckingham’s talent as a guitarist certainly shines through on Not Too Late but that doesn't keep the Californian's voice from taking a somewhat commercial turn at times. This anthology also sees the release of two new tracks: Hunger and Ride This Road as well as folk ballads from the early days such as Don't Look Down. This is a journey through time from Buckingham’s first solo album in 1981 to the present day. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 15, 2008 | Reprise

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Rock - Released June 9, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Christine McVie rejoined Fleetwood Mac in 2013 after a 16-year absence. In the aftermath, the classic Rumours quintet -- McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, John McVie, and Mick Fleetwood -- were readying the ground to record for the first time since 1987. Nicks, however, despite public affirmations that she was on board, bailed to pursue her solo work, creating the kind of melodrama that has made Fleetwood Mac one of pop's most dysfunctional outfits. Buckingham and McVie had already written songs for the band project -- together and separately -- and decided to complete the record anyway with the rhythm section. Four-fifths of Fleetwood Mac albums have appeared before to very mixed results. While this set falls prey to that a bit given Nicks' absence, the end result remains quite positive and, with more time, this version of the band could continue with great success. The set commences with three absolute knockouts. Buckingham's opener "Sleeping Around the Corner" first appeared as a bonus track on his Seeds We Sow, but this rework is better; it's steeped in the melodic signature he's so effectively employed with Fleetwood Mac as traces of early rock harmonies are wed to slightly wonky rhythm and keyboard charts, joined to a killer new bridge and refrain. It's followed by "Feel About You," one of the pair's three co-writes. Framed by a marimba and John McVie's bassline, its Caribbean flavor is offset by a doo wop-esque lyric line behind Christine's breezy vocal -- that still offers more than a hint of ache in its grain. Buckingham's "In My World" combines Tusk's production flare with the breathy call-and-response vocal moans from Tango in the Night's "Big Love." The glorious sun-kissed pop of McVie's "Red Sun" is gorgeously crafted. It contains a stacked vocal hook that makes us forget about Nicks altogether. Buckingham's "Love Is Here to Stay" sounds more like something off one of his solo albums, but it's a gorgeous song and the interplay of voices in the backdrop embraces the whole band. The jointly composed "Too Far Gone" is a funky, love-it-or-hate-it track. Its big funky riff stands at odds with McVie's vocal. But more than this, it contains Buckingham's maddening trademark production excess that employs big tribal drum breakdowns that disrupt everything. Likewise, McVie's "Game of Pretend" is a syrupy and uncharacteristically clumsy ballad that drags on far longer than it should and feels like filler. Her closer, "Carnival Begins," is far more successful. It's mercurial, dreamy, and actually recalls the Bob Welch-era Fleetwood Mac that delivered "Mystified." Buckingham's screaming guitar break at the end, however, reconciles it to the band's current sonic sphere. While Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie isn't perfect -- and it was smart not to bill this effort as a Fleetwood Mac record -- it's far better than expected, and indeed, they should have made it happen long ago. While you can never tell what might happen with this crew, one can only hope that this pair teams up again soon. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 24, 2008 | Reprise

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Rock - Released September 12, 2008 | Reprise

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Rock - Released February 16, 2010 | Reprise

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Rock - Released July 17, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 31, 2011 | Mercury Studios

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Rock - Released July 22, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released February 16, 2010 | Reprise

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Rock - Released November 27, 2006 | Reprise

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Rock - Released June 8, 2021 | Reprise

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Rock - Released June 9, 2017 | Atlantic Records

Christine McVie rejoined Fleetwood Mac in 2013 after a 16-year absence. In the aftermath, the classic Rumours quintet -- McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, John McVie, and Mick Fleetwood -- were readying the ground to record for the first time since 1987. Nicks, however, despite public affirmations that she was on board, bailed to pursue her solo work, creating the kind of melodrama that has made Fleetwood Mac one of pop's most dysfunctional outfits. Buckingham and McVie had already written songs for the band project -- together and separately -- and decided to complete the record anyway with the rhythm section. Four-fifths of Fleetwood Mac albums have appeared before to very mixed results. While this set falls prey to that a bit given Nicks' absence, the end result remains quite positive and, with more time, this version of the band could continue with great success. The set commences with three absolute knockouts. Buckingham's opener "Sleeping Around the Corner" first appeared as a bonus track on his Seeds We Sow, but this rework is better; it's steeped in the melodic signature he's so effectively employed with Fleetwood Mac as traces of early rock harmonies are wed to slightly wonky rhythm and keyboard charts, joined to a killer new bridge and refrain. It's followed by "Feel About You," one of the pair's three co-writes. Framed by a marimba and John McVie's bassline, its Caribbean flavor is offset by a doo wop-esque lyric line behind Christine's breezy vocal -- that still offers more than a hint of ache in its grain. Buckingham's "In My World" combines Tusk's production flare with the breathy call-and-response vocal moans from Tango in the Night's "Big Love." The glorious sun-kissed pop of McVie's "Red Sun" is gorgeously crafted. It contains a stacked vocal hook that makes us forget about Nicks altogether. Buckingham's "Love Is Here to Stay" sounds more like something off one of his solo albums, but it's a gorgeous song and the interplay of voices in the backdrop embraces the whole band. The jointly composed "Too Far Gone" is a funky, love-it-or-hate-it track. Its big funky riff stands at odds with McVie's vocal. But more than this, it contains Buckingham's maddening trademark production excess that employs big tribal drum breakdowns that disrupt everything. Likewise, McVie's "Game of Pretend" is a syrupy and uncharacteristically clumsy ballad that drags on far longer than it should and feels like filler. Her closer, "Carnival Begins," is far more successful. It's mercurial, dreamy, and actually recalls the Bob Welch-era Fleetwood Mac that delivered "Mystified." Buckingham's screaming guitar break at the end, however, reconciles it to the band's current sonic sphere. While Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie isn't perfect -- and it was smart not to bill this effort as a Fleetwood Mac record -- it's far better than expected, and indeed, they should have made it happen long ago. While you can never tell what might happen with this crew, one can only hope that this pair teams up again soon. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 1, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Eagle Rock - Eagle Records

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Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | Reprise

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Rock - Released October 5, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

In the big family of great guitarists names such as Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Frank Zappa are always on the tip of the tongue. But Lindsey Buckingham, formerly of Fleetwood Mac, certainly merits a place in this hall of fame. Now 69 years old, the three-time Grammy winner built up a big fanbase in the 1970s and 1980s but has also had a very full career since. Buckingham has six studio albums to his name, three live albums and one record which he made with Christine McVie of Fleetwood Mac. Solo Anthology: The Best Of Lindsey Buckingham clocks in at over three hours long and is made up, for the most part, of the artist's original tracks. It's a kind of vast résumé of his career including live and alternative takes of tracks from albums such as Law and Order, Go Insane and Out of the Cradle, but also his collaborations with McVie on the 2017 album Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie. Buckingham’s talent as a guitarist certainly shines through on Not Too Late but that doesn't keep the Californian's voice from taking a somewhat commercial turn at times. This anthology also sees the release of two new tracks: Hunger and Ride This Road as well as folk ballads from the early days such as Don't Look Down. This is a journey through time from Buckingham’s first solo album in 1981 to the present day. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 14, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Lindsey Buckingham in the magazine
  • A journey through time
    A journey through time In the big family of great guitarists names such as Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Frank Zappa are always on the tip of the tongue. But Lindsey Buckingham, formerly of Fleetwood Mac, certainly me...