Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
A number one album in both the Top 200 and country album charts in early 1975, this was Ronstadt's breakthrough into wider stardom, spawning hit singles on both the country and pop charts. When describing the string of mid-70s albums that were the fruit of the partnership between singer Linda Ronstadt and producer Peter Asher, the word "curated" seems to fit best. The Ronstadt/Asher song choice alchemy here reached perfection for the first time. Every track feels and sounds exactly right, the sonics are stellar, and the arrangements and playing are transcendent. Here the talented pair mix songwriters, tempos and a range of emotions stretching from the accusatory opening blast of "You're No Good" to a somber, slow duet with Maria Muldaur on the Anna McGarrigle-penned title track. Ronstadt is again backed by a crowd of supremely musical players, led this time by multi-instrumentalist Andrew Gold. Never afraid to wade into deep waters and add her own reading to songs indelibly associated with another singer, Ronstadt here turns in a compelling take on the Dan Penn/Spooner Oldham classic, "Dark Side of the Street," (otherwise best known as the signature hit for baritone soul singer James Carr). Further on, the trio of The Everly Brothers' "When Will I Be Loved," through Lowell George's "Willin" to a duet with Emmylou Harris on Hank Williams' "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)," is a quintessential example of the carefully calibrated, track-by-track mix of styles and arrangements that made Ronstadt's best 70s albums so listenable and their star into such a towering artist. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Pop - Released June 29, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1985 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
A number one album in both the Top 200 and country album charts in early 1975, this was Ronstadt's breakthrough into wider stardom, spawning hit singles on both the country and pop charts. When describing the string of mid-70s albums that were the fruit of the partnership between singer Linda Ronstadt and producer Peter Asher, the word "curated" seems to fit best. The Ronstadt/Asher song choice alchemy here reached perfection for the first time. Every track feels and sounds exactly right, the sonics are stellar, and the arrangements and playing are transcendent. Here the talented pair mix songwriters, tempos and a range of emotions stretching from the accusatory opening blast of "You're No Good" to a somber, slow duet with Maria Muldaur on the Anna McGarrigle-penned title track. Ronstadt is again backed by a crowd of supremely musical players, led this time by multi-instrumentalist Andrew Gold. Never afraid to wade into deep waters and add her own reading to songs indelibly associated with another singer, Ronstadt here turns in a compelling take on the Dan Penn/Spooner Oldham classic, "Dark Side of the Street," (otherwise best known as the signature hit for baritone soul singer James Carr). Further on, the trio of The Everly Brothers' "When Will I Be Loved," through Lowell George's "Willin" to a duet with Emmylou Harris on Hank Williams' "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)," is a quintessential example of the carefully calibrated, track-by-track mix of styles and arrangements that made Ronstadt's best 70s albums so listenable and their star into such a towering artist. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
A number one album in both the Top 200 and country album charts in early 1975, this was Ronstadt’s breakthrough into wider stardom, spawning hit singles on both the country and pop charts. When describing the string of mid-70s albums that were the fruit of the partnership between singer Linda Ronstadt and producer Peter Asher, the word "curated" seems to fit best. The Ronstadt/Asher song choice alchemy here reached perfection for the first time. Every track feels and sounds exactly right, the sonics are stellar, and the arrangements and playing are transcendent. Here the talented pair mix songwriters, tempos and a range of emotions stretching from the accusatory opening blast of "You’re No Good" to a somber, slow duet with Maria Muldaur on the Anna McGarrigle-penned title track. Ronstadt is again backed by a crowd of supremely musical players, led this time by multi-instrumentalist Andrew Gold. Never afraid to wade into deep waters and add her own reading to songs indelibly associated with another singer, Ronstadt here turns in a compelling take on the Dan Penn/Spooner Oldham classic, "Dark Side of the Street," (otherwise best known as the signature hit for baritone soul singer James Carr). Further on, the trio of The Everly Brothers’ "When Will I Be Loved," through Lowell George’s "Willin" to a duet with Emmylou Harris on Hank Williams’ "I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You)," is a quintessential example of the carefully calibrated, track-by-track mix of styles and arrangements that made Ronstadt’s best 70s albums so listenable and their star into such a towering artist. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 15, 2017 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res
The classic 70s albums that Ronstadt and Peter Asher made together are so much alike that they can feel like one long, well-recorded session as she effortlessly glides between emotions and genres with awesome vocal prowess and impeccable taste in material. This aesthetic was distilled to its purest essence here and not surprisingly, its greatest success. Gone for these sessions is multi-instrumentalist Andrew Gold who has been replaced by Waddy Wachtel’s crunchier guitar tone and more rocking approach—both welcome and immediately apparent. The instrumental gang present on past albums has been paired down to fewer strings and simpler arrangements; J.D. Souther, Don Henley and Dolly Parton all add backing vocals. Famous for knocking Fleetwood Mac's Rumors out of the top spot on the U.S. Billboard Pop Album Chart and buoyed by the most reflective and compelling track sequence in her entire catalog, Simple Dreams is animated by a wonderfully fearless eclecticism. While her rousing cover of Buddy Holly's "It's So Easy" feels right, her decision to cover Roy Orbison proved life-changing. Initially sung in the lower reaches of her vocal range, she soon cuts loose on his luscious ballad "Blue Bayou," lingering on every word and fashioning the archetypal hit single that epitomizes her certain ear and broad vision for what material she could connect to emotionally and vocally make her own. Powerful versions of two of Warren Zevon's finest songs ("Poor Poor Pitiful Me"—toughened up by Wachtel's electric guitar growl—and the junkie lament "Carmelita") show yet again the affinity Ronstadt has for Zevon's peculiar worldview. As final proof that in the 70s she could literally sing almost anything well, she zestfully digs into a credible, razor-toned, guitar-driven version of the Jagger/Richard's Exile-era hit, "Tumbling Dice." While Gilbert & Sullivan, traditional Mexican music and collaborations with Nelson Riddle were all in her future, Ronstadt's run of classic 70s albums hit a highpoint with this tour de force. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
HI-RES$17.99
CD$15.49

Pop - Released June 24, 2015 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res
HI-RES$59.49
CD$51.49

Pop - Released May 23, 2014 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released February 1, 2019 | Rhino

Hi-Res
There's a certain cosmic symmetry to the fact that Linda Ronstadt and her mighty voice—which were never captured on an official live record during her 70s and 80s heyday—have shot up the sales charts via a live soundtrack to an April 1980 HBO special at a time when Parkinson's disease has cruelly extinguished her ability to sing. Recorded sound from television shows is notorious for being compromised and having limited dynamic range, and here those problems still exist but happily the sound in a 24-bit/96kHz stereo transfer which was given a "very minor burnishing," according to reissue producer John Boylan, is very good. The major tweak: bringing up Ronstadt's voice in the mix. Live in Hollywood's 12 tracks (culled by Ronstadt from the film's 20 song set) were wisely selected to emphasize her 70s hits. Driven by an energetic crowd, the entire performance snaps into focus immediately, with opener "I Can't Let Go." Another big plus here is the obvious chemistry amongst a band featuring guitarist Danny Kortchmar, Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne and drummer Russ Kunkel. Buddy Holly's "It's So Easy," Lowell George's "Willin'" and Roy Orbison's "Blue Bayou" (her perennial knockout punch) are all here in near-definitive versions. Ronstadt, who has often said she sings better after she's been onstage for awhile, audibly cranks up the tempos and intensity for the trio of "You're No Good," "How Do I Make You" and Chuck Berry's "Back in the USA," before closing with a masterful rendition of her signature ballad "Desperado," accompanied only by Payne's piano, Finally, nearly 40 years later, we have a tight, rockin', supremely musical example of Ronstadt at her peak. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
HI-RES$86.49
CD$74.99

Pop - Released May 23, 2014 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Pop - Released August 21, 2015 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res
As perhaps should be expected from a double-disc collection bearing 30 tracks, Just One Look: Classic Linda Ronstadt does indeed cover most of Ronstadt's career, beginning with the Stone Poneys' "Different Drum" and running into the late '90s, when she wrapped up her time with Elektra Records. This doesn't mean each era gets equal weight, however. Just One Look emphasizes her latter-day adult contemporary material over her cracking early country-rock, a trade-off that will likely satisfy listeners familiar with Ronstadt mainly through the radio. This does mean there are some terrific works left behind -- her big breakthrough "You're No Good" comes just six songs into this collection, so anything prior to that gets short shrift, but this settles into a good soft rock groove and should satisfy a listener who wants nothing but hits, and a lot of them at that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

World - Released April 29, 2016 | Rhino - Elektra

Linda Ronstadt abandoned the pop audience in 1983, turning toward traditional pop music. She recorded three albums with Nelson Riddle before changing direction yet again, this time recording a set of traditional Mexican songs titled Canciones de Mi Padre. As the title suggests, the record is a fairly sentimental collection, since these are songs from her childhood and her heritage. Occasionally, Ronstadt oversells the songs but overall, the album is charming, affectionate, entertaining, and more successful than her stilted Nelson Riddle collaborations. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 21, 1987 | Rhino - Elektra

Led by Ronstadt's continually expanding musical tastes, the churn of young songwriters in 70s Southern California and the studio smarts of Peter Asher, the portrait of Ronstadt the artist continues to gain bone and sinew here with the widest selection of material yet covered. Carefully recorded and presented in a manicured guitars-strings-background vocal production style and sprawling, inventive arrangements brought to life by a virtual army of musical contributors, the object was to turn the prism on her rich, multi-faceted voice, providing different contexts for the urgency, anguish and vulnerability that she was so capable of projecting. In terms of pure singing, Prisoner in Disguise may contain the finest vocal performances in her entire catalog of recordings. While ballads predominate, the sources here are impeccable and she nails them all. Opening with a bravura vocal performance on Neil Young's "Love is a Rose" she indulges her deep love for Motown in a measured version of Smokey Robinson's "Track of My Tears" and a rip-roaring, original-challenging charge through Martha and The Vandellas' "Heat Wave." As was often the case, she chose to name the album after an evocative, bittersweet ballad, here written by J.D. Souther, who also sings harmony on the track. Other highlights include a foray into reggae spiritualism via Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers to Cross," a cover of Little Feat’s "Roll Um Easy" (featuring Lowell George on slide guitar), and a pre-Whitney cover of Dolly Parton's "I Will Always Love You," which while lacking Houston’s firepower is still artful and impassioned. A Top Ten hit on both the pop and country album charts, Prisoner in Disguise is a radiant, original example of Ronstadt's taste and virtuosity. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
CD$12.99

Pop - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

By the mid-70s, Linda Ronstadt and producer Asher had achieved a consistency with her albums, becoming almost clairvoyant in mixing material from a variety of sources, in styles ranging from art house esoteric to radio ready, into a coherent whole that continued to satisfy existing fans and win enthusiastic new converts. After her vocals and innate gift for unerring phrasing, it's the incomparable songwriting that's allowed these records to age so gracefully. Two major talents in the SoCal songwriting universe, Karla Bonoff and Warren Zevon, are elemental to the success of Hasten Down the Wind. Bonoff is heard in the moody bookends of opener "Lose Again," and closer "Someone to Lay Down Beside Me." And Zevon's dark ballad, here turned into a gentle lament with Don Henley singing harmony, serves as the album's title track. The Grammy winning collection is anchored by a pair of sure-fire covers. Ronstadt confidently eases into Willie Nelson's "Crazy," putting her stamp on Patsy Cline's most emblematic hit with phrasing and a vocal timbre that are memorably distinct from Cline. Another example of Ronstadt's joyous way with the hits of her youth lies in her romping version of Buddy Holly's "That'll Be the Day." While she would go on in the 1980s to famously breathe new energy into the Great American Songbook with Nelson Riddle, her now classic 70s albums have become a compendium of enduring pop/rock songwriting from a similarly fertile pool of creativity. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

In many regards, Linda Ronstadt's self-titled third album isn't much different than her first two. Like Hand Sown…Home Grown and Silk Purse, Linda Ronstadt combines classic country songs -- Johnny Cash's "I Still Miss Someone," Patsy Cline's "I Fall to Pieces," Jerry Lee Lewis' "Crazy Arms," the folk standard "Ramblin' Round" -- with new songs from rising songwriters (Jackson Browne, Eric Kaz, Livingston Taylor, Neil Young, Eric Andersen) and an R&B cover (Fontella Bass' "Rescue Me"), but the difference is synthesis. Here, Ronstadt doesn't run from her Californian base, nor does she attempt to fit into the confines from Nashville; she finds the common threads between the songs and sounds, tying together her love of the old and new right along with her love of country, rock, and soul. Certainly, she's assisted by a versatile, sympathetic backing band assembled by producer John Boylan, a band that would later work on their own as the Eagles, but there's never a suggestion that the band is attempting to outshine the singer. All are united by the music, enjoying turning "I Still Miss Someone" and "Crazy Arms" into country ballads, breathing full life into Browne's "Rock Me on the Water," playing "I Fall to Pieces" with a muscularity that avoids overt homage, and reveling in the harmonies on Young's "Birds." This is music for the dawn of the '70s, music that shakes off some of the hippie dreams of the '60s in favor of lushly detailed authenticity that has an eye on the past while living for the present. Ronstadt might not have wound up with a smash hit here -- "Rock Me on the Water" did make some radio waves -- but this is the birth of the aesthetic that would serve her well throughout the '70s, and it remains potent. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released December 19, 2006 | Rhino - Elektra

On the strength of the hit duet with Aaron Neville, "Don't Know Much," Cry Like a Rainstorm -- Howl Like the Wind returned Linda Ronstadt to the top of the charts. The album was a collection of well-constructed adult contemporary pop, which suits her voice better than the traditional pop she recorded during the mid-'80s. Musically, Cry Like a Rainstorm isn't as adventurous as Canciones de Mi Padre, nor is it as consistent as Trio, the album she recorded with Emmylou Harris and Dolly Parton, but it is her most satisfying mainstream pop album she has made since the late '70s. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 15, 1986 | Elektra Records

For Sentimental Reasons was the last traditional pop album Linda Ronstadt recorded with Nelson Riddle, and it's virtually indistinguishable from its two predecessors -- it has the same sweeping arrangements, and her voice remains adequate, not spectacular. That said, For Sentimental Reasons is notable since it contains a high percentage of familiar -- some might say overly familiar -- standards like "When You Wish Upon a Star," "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered," "My Funny Valentine," "Am I Blue," and "'Round Midnight," which might make the album more appealing to casual fans who want to hear Ronstadt sing songs they know if they're going to hear her in this setting. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released November 18, 2008 | Asylum

Although J.D. Souther produced most of Don’t Cry Now, Linda Ronstadt’s fourth solo album, it was Peter Asher (brought in to helm a pair of tunes: "Sail Away," and "I Believe in You") who proved to be this album’s most career-changing effect. A onetime half of the British duo Peter and Gordon as well as A&R head for The Beatles’ Apple Records, Asher and the then still-emerging artist Ronstadt had an instantaneous natural connection which empowered a string of classic smooth Southern California-styled country rock records. Derided by some as too calculated and polished, they nevertheless made Ronstadt a star and with Don’t Cry Now, started her 70s run as an award show and singles chart mainstay. Assembling an all-star group of musicians from Southern California, Memphis and Nashville that included guitarist Larry Carlton, pedal steel player Buddy Emmons, singer Glenn Frey, keyboardist Spooner Oldham and drummer Russ Kunkel guaranteed a solid musical foundation. Besides impeccable taste in material, Asher and Ronstadt’s secret weapon was the plethora of new material to choose from coming from young SoCal-based writers like Souther, Frey, Don Henley, Randy Newman and Neil Young. While "Love Has No Pride" and her exquisite negotiation of Glenn Frey and Don Henley’s "Desperado" became permanent parts of her live set, it was "Silver Threads and Golden Needles," first recorded four years earlier on Hand Sown… Home Grown, that became a Top 20 country hit. The wild card here is Newman’s "Sail Away," complete with pedal steel and Ronstadt singing over a female gospel choir. An intriguing start to an influential partnership. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Capitol Records

Abandoning California for Nashville, Linda Ronstadt does take a stab at relatively straight-ahead country on her second album, Silk Purse. She's changed location and producers -- Elliot Mazer, who'd later be Neil Young's right-hand man for archival projects, helmed this -- but she hasn't quite thrown herself into the maelstrom of Music City here. Many of the soft, flowery flourishes of Hand Sown…Home Grown have been traded in for steel guitars and echoing acoustics, a move that definitely reads country, but Ronstadt's sensibility remains rooted on the West Coast, favoring great emerging songwriters and revived, reworked versions of classics. Only a couple of these are classic country, however -- just Hank Williams' "Lovesick Blues" and Mel Tillis' "Mental Revenge," which are balanced by Goffin/King's "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" and "I'm Leaving It All Up to You," R&B hits given nice country rearrangements (the latter in particular feels suited to its new barroom rendition). These rearrangements, alongside covers of Gene Clark & Bernie Leadon's "He Darked the Sun" and Paul Siebel's "Louise," suggest that Ronstadt's sensibility is a bit more cosmopolitan than country, but that's the great thing about Silk Purse: perhaps she didn't find her voice, not in the way she would a year later on her eponymous record, but this Nashville excursion had a clarifying effect, whittling down the musical excesses and strengthening her aesthetic while winding up a nifty little record in its own right. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$25.49

Pop - Released December 19, 2006 | Rhino - Elektra

Round Midnight is a two-disc box set that compiles all three of the traditional pop albums Linda Ronstadt recorded with Nelson Riddle (What's New, Lush Life, and For Sentimental Reasons). Only dedicated fans will need to own all three of the albums, and, for those listeners, this is a classy way to purchase them. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released November 3, 1987 | Asylum

Linda Ronstadt abandoned the pop audience in 1983, turning toward traditional pop music. She recorded three albums with Nelson Riddle before changing direction yet again, this time recording a set of traditional Mexican songs titled Canciones de Mi Padre. As the title suggests, the record is a fairly sentimental collection, since these are songs from her childhood and her heritage. Occasionally, Ronstadt oversells the songs but overall, the album is charming, affectionate, entertaining, and more successful than her stilted Nelson Riddle collaborations. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo