Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.99

Country - Released March 27, 2020 | New West Records

Hi-Res
With her strong, high voice and dedication to gritty, personal songwriting, Lilly Hiatt (daughter of John) deserves much credit for steadily building a separate musical identity in a career where being your own person seems next to impossible. Raised in Nashville exposed to her father's talent and connections, Hiatt relentlessly plumbs her emotional autobiography for material. The sinewy battleground of relationship wounds is her chosen dominion, and while this eternal subject is susceptible to tedium, the good news is that Hiatt's singing, melodies and lyrics have gained immensely in confidence and craft over the course of four albums. Walking Proof opens with "Rae," a soft tribute to the sister her father also once wrote about, before a harder, full band edge thanks to slashing electric guitar chords from producer  Lincoln Parish, the former Cage the Elephant guitarist, is announced on "P-Town." Throughout, Parish adds welcome drama to Hiatt's best tunes like the mid-tempo "Some Kind of Drug," with dad guesting on background vocals, and "Brightest Star." On the former, the struggles with love and alcohol portrayed on her last album, 2017’s Trinity Lane, have Hiatt now admitting, "Her arms were open, wild eyed and hoping/Somebody could give her that kind of love." This collection's obvious air of determination and assurance is confirmed in the slow, sure finale, "Scream," where the resolute last line reveals her plan, "I ain't slowing down for nobody." © Robert Baird / Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 25, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2015 | Normaltown Records

Hi-Res
Not a lot of artists would claim both Lucinda Williams and Dinosaur Jr. as influences, but on her second album, 2015's Royal Blue, Lilly Hiatt genuinely sounds like someone who has both of those artists in regular rotation, even if she bears little direct resemblance to either. It's a lot easier to hear how Williams fits into Hiatt's formula, since they're both women who write songs with an introspective streak, a big portion of emotional honesty, and a decided country accent. Williams seems to be more of a kindred spirit, however, than a direct influence on Royal Blue, as Hiatt's lyrical approach is noticeably more measured, though no less incisive, and she has a wit and keen intelligence that's all her own (the title alone makes "Jesus Would Have Let Me Pick the Restaurant" worth hearing, and the rest of the song is nearly as clever). And no, there's no guitar work on Royal Blue that's up to a J. Mascis level of towering noise, but for someone traveling the rootsy side of the Nashville songwriting community, it's pretty clear Hiatt isn't afraid of laying in a noisy guitar solo or some carefully modulated feedback, and Beth Finney's electric guitar and Luke Schneider's pedal steel give this a good, scrappy texture that's a welcome switch from the spit and polish of most contemporary Nashville productions. Whether she's sorrowful, confused, or downright angry about her relationships with various men, Hiatt sounds honest and unafraid on Royal Blue's 12 songs, and she can rock out or lay back with equal conviction. Adam Landry's production does better by the music than it does by Hiatt's vocals, which are often a bit too deep in the mix, but the loose and open sound of this material is a step in the right direction, sounding like a more comfortable fit than the more pared-down tone of 2012's Let Down. Royal Blue makes it clear that Hiatt is a naturally gifted songwriter, and she's getting better at the separate but related art of making records. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Country - Released January 31, 2020 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Country - Released January 9, 2020 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 25, 2017 | New West Records

There are plenty of working songwriters who would be lost if they couldn't pen lyrics about alcohol or broken hearts. Lilly Hiatt isn't one of them, but both of those subjects pop up a lot on her third album, 2017's Trinity Lane. Hiatt had gone through a serious breakup and gave up drinking before she started writing the songs for this album, and these two struggles inform many of the songs on Trinity Lane (named for the street in East Nashville where she was living when she wrote the album). While Hiatt showed off her strength as both a songwriter and a vocalist on her first two albums, Trinity Lane is significantly more personal than anything she's released to date, and she's stepped up her game as she's bared her soul with these 12 songs. There's plenty of hard-won wisdom on this album, and if Hiatt sounds as if she's learned her lessons about her exes as well as the bottle, she doesn't have any illusions about her feelings about either. The bitterness of "Everything I Had" and the delusions of "Different, I Guess" feel as real and as honest as the more reasoned resignation of "The Night David Bowie Died." If the title tune celebrates the hard, good work of sobriety, "I Wanna Go Home" is a pained remembrance of the bad nights along the way. And "Imposter" is a striking look into Hiatt's sometimes troubled family relations. Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope produced Trinity Lane as well as handling many of the instrumental chores, and he gives the music a moody, atmospheric tone that serves the songs very well; Hiatt allows her natural country twang to step forth in her vocals, and it meshes beautifully with the confessional tone of her lyrics. Trinity Lane is honest, well-crafted, and hits an emotional bulls-eye: it's Lilly Hiatt's strongest and most moving work to date. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2017 | New West Records

From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2015 | Normaltown Records

Not a lot of artists would claim both Lucinda Williams and Dinosaur Jr. as influences, but on her second album, 2015's Royal Blue, Lilly Hiatt genuinely sounds like someone who has both of those artists in regular rotation, even if she bears little direct resemblance to either. It's a lot easier to hear how Williams fits into Hiatt's formula, since they're both women who write songs with an introspective streak, a big portion of emotional honesty, and a decided country accent. Williams seems to be more of a kindred spirit, however, than a direct influence on Royal Blue, as Hiatt's lyrical approach is noticeably more measured, though no less incisive, and she has a wit and keen intelligence that's all her own (the title alone makes "Jesus Would Have Let Me Pick the Restaurant" worth hearing, and the rest of the song is nearly as clever). And no, there's no guitar work on Royal Blue that's up to a J. Mascis level of towering noise, but for someone traveling the rootsy side of the Nashville songwriting community, it's pretty clear Hiatt isn't afraid of laying in a noisy guitar solo or some carefully modulated feedback, and Beth Finney's electric guitar and Luke Schneider's pedal steel give this a good, scrappy texture that's a welcome switch from the spit and polish of most contemporary Nashville productions. Whether she's sorrowful, confused, or downright angry about her relationships with various men, Hiatt sounds honest and unafraid on Royal Blue's 12 songs, and she can rock out or lay back with equal conviction. Adam Landry's production does better by the music than it does by Hiatt's vocals, which are often a bit too deep in the mix, but the loose and open sound of this material is a step in the right direction, sounding like a more comfortable fit than the more pared-down tone of 2012's Let Down. Royal Blue makes it clear that Hiatt is a naturally gifted songwriter, and she's getting better at the separate but related art of making records. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 25, 2017 | New West Records

From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 11, 2017 | New West Records

From
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Country - Released March 24, 2020 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Country - Released February 18, 2020 | New West Records

Hi-Res