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Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Milestone

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This LP comprises one of altoist Lee Konitz's greatest sessions. In 1967 he recorded a series of very diverse duets, all of which succeed on their own terms. Konitz is matched with valve trombonist Marshall Brown on a delightful version of "Struttin' with Some Barbecue" and matches wits with the tenor of Joe Henderson on "You Don't Know What Love Is." He plays "Checkerboard" with pianist Dick Katz, "Erb" with guitarist Jim Hall, "Tickle Toe" with the tenor of Richie Kamuca (Konitz switches to tenor on that cut), and an adventurous and fairly free "Duplexity" with violinist Ray Nance. Konitz also has three different duets in five versions of "Alone Together" and, on "Alphanumeric," welcomes practically everyone back for a final blowout. The music ranges from Dixieland to bop and free, and is consistently fascinating. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released August 12, 2011 | ECM

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
"Boring" feels like such a pejorative description. It's better to call this all-star summit conference of sleepy time jazz players, led by alto saxophonist Lee Konitz and including pianist Brad Mehldau and bassist Charlie Haden, in addition to Paul Motian on drums, "stately," "refined," or "relaxed". The fact that the tunes -- all standards -- are virtually indistinguishable from each other, and go on at least five, and in one case, ten minutes too long in order to make room for just one more lugubrious bowed bass solo from Haden or one more slow-motion Mehldau keyboard interlude, should not be taken as prima facie evidence of the emptiness of this sort of pseudo-event, all too common in New York jazz clubs. After all, the live audience eats it up, as can clearly be heard. But is this album of any value to jazz as a whole? It is not. This is the sound of three men whose reputations rest on work done decades earlier, and one younger man whose reputation is difficult to explain, delicately tiptoeing through six pieces, some of which have been recorded hundreds if not thousands of times already. It is as far as possible from the sound of jazz moving forward, or preserving the creative vitality that is supposedly the heart of the genre. If all you want is to hear four accomplished musicians playing standards, this album provides an hour's worth of that. If you want more from jazz, you're out of luck. ~ Phil Freeman
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Jazz - Released March 26, 2010 | ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Well into his eighties, alto saxophone grand master Lee Konitz continues to come up with fresh approaches playing modern mainstream jazz with an edge. Teamed here with the multi-national trio dubbed Minsarah, Konitz is reunited with German pianist Florian Weber, himself an iconoclast and progressive thinker. Recorded at the historic Village Vanguard in N.Y.C. on two separate nights gives any prepared listener all the challenges and satisfaction one could ask from the vaunted and still viable Konitz. If you've heard a thousand versions of the bop flag waver "Cherokee," perhaps the East Indian-flavored and churning rendition by Konitz and his charges will enlighten you. Originals like the pensive but easy swinger "Subconscious-Lee" or the soul/spirit song "Kay's Trance" will convince you that the saxophonist is still quite capable of digging in and standing his ground, physically or emotionally. While a variation of "All The Things You Are" that Konitz has dubbed "Thingin'" always hits the mark with deft chord substitutions, it is never played the same way twice . Whether in fleet bop constructs, breathy but concise long tones, or choppy off-minor phrases, Konitz always makes sure that every single note counts. Weber's feature "Color" sans the alto, has the pianist stretching out in morning dew refrains then cutting loose, and again backing down dynamically in complete command of his instrument. Bassist Jeff Denson (from San Diego) and drummer Ziv Ravitz (a native of Israel) round out the New Quartet, supplying Konitz with grace or firepower galore on this impressive recording that hopefully yields follow-up volumes, either from the Vanguard or other hallowed grounds. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released May 16, 2008 | ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released December 30, 1998 | ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | Verve

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Jazz - Released February 10, 2017 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released October 18, 1999 | SendDigital

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Jazz - Released October 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1957 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released December 18, 2015 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Fantasy Records

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Jazz - Released July 29, 2016 | MPS

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Jazz - Released April 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

This excellent recording (part of their 1987 Jazzlore series) features altoist Lee Konitz with two separate quartets during 1956. Either guitarist Billy Bauer or pianist Sal Mosca are the main supporting voices in groups also including either Arnold Fishkind or Peter Ind on bass and Dick Scott on drums. The most unusual aspect to the set is that on the four selections with Mosca, Konitz switches to tenor, playing quite effectively in a recognizable cool style. The overall highlights of this enjoyable album are "Everything Happens to Me," "All of Me," and "Star Eyes," but all eight performances are well played and swinging. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released February 10, 2017 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Fantasy Records

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Jazz - Released January 19, 2018 | ECM

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Jazz - Released October 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Fantasy Records

This is an excellent release that is fairly typical of a Lee Konitz program from the 1970s and '80s. There are a few standards (such as "Just Friends," "Green Dolphin Street" and "What's New"), a few fairly advanced pieces ("Satori" and "Free Blues"), thoughtful improvisations and a bit of hard-swinging. Inspired by the presence of pianist Martial Solal, bassist David Holland and drummer Jack DeJohnette, Konitz stretches himself as usual and comes up with consistently fresh statements while generally playing at a low introspective volume. ~ Scott Yanow