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Film Soundtracks - Released October 5, 2018 | A Star is Born OST

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Pop - Released May 29, 2020 | Interscope

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According to Lady Gaga, Chromatica is an imaginary planet, a utopia that concretises her search for happiness. "I live on Chromatica, that is where I live. I went into my frame - I found Earth, I deleted it. Earth is cancelled", she said during the promotion for this sixth album, released less than two years after the global success of the soundtrack for A Star Is Born. Chromatica's sci-fi concept naturally steered the singer towards electronic music, tinged with concise and melodic pop. She not only surrounded herself with experienced producers (BloodPop, Burns, Madeon, Axwell...), but also with "extra-terrestrial" guest stars: Ariana Grande (Rain on Me), the K-pop band Blackpink (Sour Candy), and - with a large generational gap - Elton John (Sine From Above).On this flamboyant pink outfit-filled planet, Lady Gaga displays herself as a warrior fighting her own demons, as well as external threats, especially those that overwhelm her fellow-women (Plastic Doll, Free Woman). Her weapon of choice? The most "stupid" love there is, which she clamours for in a cathartic and liberating way (Stupid Love). As the queen of binary bass drums and boundless joy (Fun Tonight), she also has a calm side, especially in three lyrical and majestic instrumentals (Chromatica I, II and III). As the title suggests, Lady Gaga's planet presents an entire spectrum of colours, just like the singer's resolutely colourful soul. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 18, 2009 | Interscope

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Interscope

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Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Interscope

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Pop - Released May 23, 2011 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 5, 2018 | A Star is Born OST

Booklet
There's a narrative to the soundtrack for Bradley Cooper's 2018 remake of A Star Is Born, one that mirrors the one told in the movie. Often, the album features dialogue ripped from the screen -- a full 15 tracks, actually, amounting to seven minutes of this 74-minute album -- which means A Star Is Born almost plays like a Disney record from the '60s or '70s: it's designed to tide listeners over until they get a chance to see the movie again. Of course, A Star Is Born is a musical, so its soundtrack is filled with full-fledged songs, all of which serve the story that the dialogue gooses along. Strip out the distracting dialogue tracks and the plot of A Star Is Born is still evident, as the music moves from the grungy Americana of Cooper's character, through his affecting duets with Lady Gaga, toward her flashy pop, and then culminating with "I'll Never Love Again," the song where the two estranged lovers reunite. Each of these phases is expertly executed. Lukas Nelson assists Cooper in the rangy grunge of "Black Eyes," while Jason Isbell's spare "Maybe It's Time" is an affecting slice of Americana. The second stage, where Gaga is duetting with Cooper, fuses their sensibilities seamlessly, particularly on the aching ballad "Shallow" and loping country-rock of "Music to My Eyes," which was co-written by Nelson and Gaga. Her pop section plays like its own EP, and it's snappy, stylish, and savvy, particularly on the retro-disco of "Why Did You Do That?" and soulful "Heal Me." All the songs make sense narratively and on their own, so they hold together well and amount to a first-rate soundtrack. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

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Pop - Released November 6, 2013 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 5, 2018 | A Star is Born OST

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There's a narrative to the soundtrack for Bradley Cooper's 2018 remake of A Star Is Born, one that mirrors the one told in the movie. Often, the album features dialogue ripped from the screen -- a full 15 tracks, actually, amounting to seven minutes of this 74-minute album -- which means A Star Is Born almost plays like a Disney record from the '60s or '70s: it's designed to tide listeners over until they get a chance to see the movie again. Of course, A Star Is Born is a musical, so its soundtrack is filled with full-fledged songs, all of which serve the story that the dialogue gooses along. Strip out the distracting dialogue tracks and the plot of A Star Is Born is still evident, as the music moves from the grungy Americana of Cooper's character, through his affecting duets with Lady Gaga, toward her flashy pop, and then culminating with "I'll Never Love Again," the song where the two estranged lovers reunite. Each of these phases is expertly executed. Lukas Nelson assists Cooper in the rangy grunge of "Black Eyes," while Jason Isbell's spare "Maybe It's Time" is an affecting slice of Americana. The second stage, where Gaga is duetting with Cooper, fuses their sensibilities seamlessly, particularly on the aching ballad "Shallow" and loping country-rock of "Music to My Eyes," which was co-written by Nelson and Gaga. Her pop section plays like its own EP, and it's snappy, stylish, and savvy, particularly on the retro-disco of "Why Did You Do That?" and soulful "Heal Me." All the songs make sense narratively and on their own, so they hold together well and amount to a first-rate soundtrack. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Interscope

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It's difficult not to view Joanne through the prism of Artpop, the 2013 album where Lady Gaga's expanding fame balloon finally popped. Ambitious but muddled, Artpop debuted high but came crashing down to the ground, stalling out after the second single, the R. Kelly duet "Do What U Want." Gaga quickly retreated to the confines of cabaret, cutting a nicely accomplished standards album with Tony Bennett, a move that not only gave her the opportunity to work with a legend, but signaled that she considered Artpop a step too far: The camp of Cheek to Cheek was elegant, not garish, an acknowledgment that she was once again back in control of her joke. It set the stage for Joanne, a clever streamlining of the Lady Gaga persona that functions as the opposite of Artpop. All the excesses are excised while the eccentricities are used as accents on songs that are usually well-rendered pop. A few numbers take a passing glance at country music -- the title "Joanne" winks at Dolly Parton's "Jolene"; in a different arrangement, the ballad "Million Reasons" could be an adult contemporary crossover from Faith Hill or Shania Twain -- but Gaga's feet remain firmly planted in dance-pop even when she brings in Father John Misty, Beck, Florence Welch, and Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age for collaborations. Homme co-wrote "Diamond Heart" and "John Wayne," two of the harder disco songs here, while Misty assists on the steady rolling "Sinner's Prayer" -- perhaps the best fusion of country and pop here -- and "Come to Mama," a buoyant throwback to Motown that finds a companion on the Welch duet "Hey Girl," an analog slow jam that floats in the shimmer light. These, plus the riotous "A-Yo" and the masturbation ode "Dancin' in Circles," don't necessarily find comfortable companions in the ballads peppered throughout the album, but executive producer Mark Ronson helps polish Joanne so it flows easily, which is its appeal. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 17, 2020 | Interscope Records

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Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Interscope

Booklet
It's difficult not to view Joanne through the prism of Artpop, the 2013 album where Lady Gaga's expanding fame balloon finally popped. Ambitious but muddled, Artpop debuted high but came crashing down to the ground, stalling out after the second single, the R. Kelly duet "Do What U Want." Gaga quickly retreated to the confines of cabaret, cutting a nicely accomplished standards album with Tony Bennett, a move that not only gave her the opportunity to work with a legend, but signaled that she considered Artpop a step too far: The camp of Cheek to Cheek was elegant, not garish, an acknowledgment that she was once again back in control of her joke. It set the stage for Joanne, a clever streamlining of the Lady Gaga persona that functions as the opposite of Artpop. All the excesses are excised while the eccentricities are used as accents on songs that are usually well-rendered pop. A few numbers take a passing glance at country music -- the title "Joanne" winks at Dolly Parton's "Jolene"; in a different arrangement, the ballad "Million Reasons" could be an adult contemporary crossover from Faith Hill or Shania Twain -- but Gaga's feet remain firmly planted in dance-pop even when she brings in Father John Misty, Beck, Florence Welch, and Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age for collaborations. Homme co-wrote "Diamond Heart" and "John Wayne," two of the harder disco songs here, while Misty assists on the steady rolling "Sinner's Prayer" -- perhaps the best fusion of country and pop here -- and "Come to Mama," a buoyant throwback to Motown that finds a companion on the Welch duet "Hey Girl," an analog slow jam that floats in the shimmer light. These, plus the riotous "A-Yo" and the masturbation ode "Dancin' in Circles," don't necessarily find comfortable companions in the ballads peppered throughout the album, but executive producer Mark Ronson helps polish Joanne so it flows easily, which is its appeal. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Pop - Released May 23, 2011 | Interscope

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Pop - Released May 29, 2020 | Interscope

Booklet
According to Lady Gaga, Chromatica is an imaginary planet, a utopia that concretises her search for happiness. "I live on Chromatica, that is where I live. I went into my frame - I found Earth, I deleted it. Earth is cancelled", she said during the promotion for this sixth album, released less than two years after the global success of the soundtrack for A Star Is Born. Chromatica's sci-fi concept naturally steered the singer towards electronic music, tinged with concise and melodic pop. She not only surrounded herself with experienced producers (BloodPop, Burns, Madeon, Axwell...), but also with "extra-terrestrial" guest stars: Ariana Grande (Rain on Me), the K-pop band Blackpink (Sour Candy), and - with a large generational gap - Elton John (Sine From Above). On this flamboyant pink outfit-filled planet, Lady Gaga displays herself as a warrior fighting her own demons, as well as external threats, especially those that overwhelm her fellow-women (Plastic Doll, Free Woman). Her weapon of choice? The most "stupid" love there is, which she clamours for in a cathartic and liberating way (Stupid Love). As the queen of binary bass drums and boundless joy (Fun Tonight), she also has a calm side, especially in three lyrical and majestic instrumentals (Chromatica I, II and III). As the title suggests, Lady Gaga's planet presents an entire spectrum of colours, just like the singer's resolutely colourful soul. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Interscope

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2011 | Interscope

Opting for something classic for Christmas, Lady Gaga trades in a bit of old-school show biz schmaltz for the four-track EP A Very Gaga Holiday, singing "White Christmas" and "Orange Colored Sky" with a swinging Vegas-studded small group, offering up some tongue-in-cheek patter, then spinning "You and I" in the same way before retreating alone to the piano for "The Edge of Glory." Artifice is Gaga's authenticity, yet she may push her affectations a little bit too hard with spoken word here, but that is a mere blemish on an otherwise very attractive holiday bauble. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 11, 2013 | Interscope

Booklet
If Born This Way was made for the Little Monsters, its 2013 sequel ARTPOP was made for the world. Lady Gaga has grand designs for her third album, to pull a "reverse Warhol," which presumably means she wants to channel high art into pop instead of pop into high art, but it's a little difficult to discern Gaga's intent, either in this statement or ARTPOP as a whole. Willfully existing simply on the surface, a surface that perhaps (or perhaps not) signifies a greater depth, ARTPOP is teasingly garish, its bright colors and brittle beats attacking with glee, the emphasis always on big, pulsating beats, shattered reflections, sound cascading over song in every instance. Inevitably, this emphasis on production means the pop in ARTPOP winds up diminished; perhaps it's "pop" in the pop-art sense, as it's shamelessly, intentionally populist, but as pop music it relies not on hooks in either its melody or rhythm, but rather a full-on glitz blitz that can dazzle as often as it tires. Lost in her self-generated mythos, Gaga doesn't much care whether her music sticks as long as she's not ignored -- even such seemingly soul-baring moments as the single-spotlight showcase "Dope" isn't confessional so much as a gearshift designed to capture attention -- and ARTPOP continually demands attention as it eschews the notion of love, right down to how all the sex songs deliberately separate the body from the soul. This isn't limited to Gaga's exhortation to R. Kelly to "do what you want with my body" on "Do What U Want," either. At times -- particularly throughout the album's first half -- ARTPOP is a non-stop erotic cabaret, Gaga contorting herself to fulfill any desire, switching roles between a guy and a girl and a bottom and a top, her ambidexterous sexuality signaling power, not sensuality. This same arrogance glides her through songs about style -- the ludicrous "Donatella," a tribute to Versace that borders on character assassination; "Fashion!," which isn't a David Bowie cover, no matter how much it longs to be -- and songs about drugs, a cycle that takes her toward a concluding coda where Gaga stands resplendent in the applause. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 26, 2018 | Interscope