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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
Lady Antebellum swept up the 2011 Grammys, winning five of their six nominated categories, cementing their status as cross-platform mainstream superstars. Certainly, Own the Night -- the 2011 sequel to their 2010 breakthrough Need You Now -- bears the sound of a band quite content with its position in the middle of the road. Any lingering elements of country, whether twang or 2-steps, have been banished and supplanted with a smooth soft rock designed to seep into the background wherever it's played. These songs of love won and lost tend to be so dreamy they verge on the sleepy, lacking any of the hushed urgency of “Need You Now” while retaining every ounce of its manicured prettiness. So, Own the Night is mood music but the aim isn’t amorous; it’s nothing more than a spot of relaxation, which doesn’t quite amount to compelling listening no matter how immaculate the execution. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released June 9, 2017 | Capitol Records Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2008 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
Lady Antebellum is a two-guys-and-a-girl trio comprised of co-lead singers Charlie Kelley and Hillary Scott with multi-instrumentalist Dave Haywood. The group is also a songwriting collective, a Nashville rarity, co-writing most of the songs on its self-titled debut album. The three may have come up with material as good as what a publisher could have provided, although they never stray too far from formula, as reused titles like "Love Don't Live Here," "Long Gone," "I Run to You," "Home Is Where the Heart Is," and "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," suggest. Love is true or false, depending on the song, or it's forgotten in the honky tonk haze of "Lookin' for a Good Time." Kelley has a sturdy country baritone, but he sometimes sounds a bit too pleased with his own rich tone and comes off mannered. Scott, by contrast, seems to know that her voice can't match Kelley's for distinctiveness, so she works harder at coming up with striking phrasing and emotional force. The contrast gives their duets a chemistry that is the band's strongest element. Producers Victoria Shaw and Paul Worley give the record a pop/rock sound, with plenty of guitars and rhythmic punch, the better to goose a little more feeling from the singers. At this point, Lady Antebellum is a group that seems to know the basics of contemporary country but isn't ready to move beyond them or redefine them for its own ends. Still, this is a good beginning. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Country - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
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Country - Released January 1, 2013 | Capitol Records Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2013 | Capitol Records Nashville

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747

Country - Released September 30, 2014 | Capitol Records Nashville

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Country - Released May 17, 2019 | BMLG Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2008 | Capitol Nashville

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747

Country - Released September 30, 2014 | Capitol Records Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released June 9, 2017 | Capitol Records Nashville

Lady Antebellum took a breather after 2014's 747, with Charles Kelley and Hillary Scott both releasing solo albums in 2016, while Dave Haywood produced the country-pop trio Post Monroe. Reconvening, the group teamed up with Busbee -- the buzz producer of 2017 thanks to his lithe, clever production for Maren Morris' 2016 debut Hero -- and headed out to the west coast to cut Heart Break. Lady Antebellum have steadily drifted toward the smooth sounds of soft rock, and recording in Southern California only accentuates their inherent mellowness. Busbee adds some flash to Lady Antebellum, particularly on the numbers that are just a shade lively. "You Look Good" cooks with a vaguely funky beat, canned synth-horns, and busy drum loops; "Good Time to Be Alive" aspires to be an affirming anthem echoing off the walls of stadiums; "Think About You" moves along to a clean, chipper hook, and "Teenage Heart" achieves a synthesis of open-road country and Lumineers-styled stomp-alongs. These are the exceptions to the sweet, soft rule, though. The rest of Heart Break is split between slow tunes -- either songs of love won or lost (notably, the title track does not belong to this latter category) -- and sugary midtempo numbers graced by the group's supple harmonies. It's mood music and designed to be as such: The alluring sheen doesn't intend to grab the ear but burrows into the subconscious, so the melodies are remembered upon repeated plays. Perhaps the songs often resemble one another, but isolate individual tracks -- especially on radio -- and they each seem sturdy and friendly, the kind of music that is proudly pleasant. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
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Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Records Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Nashville

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Dance - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Nashville

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 9, 2014 | EMI Nashville