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Rock - Released October 1, 2001 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Fame can be a fleeting mistress, and nowhere more so than in the land of dance-pop divas. Many are lucky enough to have a hit album, much less two or three. What usually takes a one-hit wonder from the singles charts to career diva lies less in catchy hooks than in a combination of talent and the choice of collaborators. Obviously, the master of this technique is Madonna, whose talent and eye for talent in others has made her not only a worldwide pop sensation, but a worldwide icon. Arguably, running a close second is Kylie Minogue. Starting off as not much more than a female voice for the massively successful Stock, Aitken & Waterman hit factory, she moved on to work with some of the most prominent dance producers of the early '90s, making her one of the most visible pop stars outside of the United States. By 1997, she moved on to working with writers outside the genre. While this may have translated into poor record sales, her motives were in the right place. With 2001's Fever, Minogue combines the disco-diva comeback of the previous year's Light Years with the trend of simple dance rhythms which was prevalent in the teen dance-pop craze of the years surrounding the album's release. While on the surface that might seem like an old dog trying to learn new tricks, Minogue pulls it off with surprising ease. The first single, "Cant Get You Out of My Head," is a sparse, mid-tempo dance number that pulses and grooves like no other she's recorded, and nothing on Light Years was as funky as the pure disco closer of "Burning Up." And while it's hard not to notice her tipping her hat to the teen pop sound (in fact, on this record she works with Cathy Dennis, former dance-pop star and writer/producer for Brit-teen pop group S Club 7) on songs like "Give It to Me" and "Love at First Sight," her maturity helps transcend this limiting tag, making this a very stylish Euro-flavored dance-pop record that will appeal to all ages. Not one weak track, not one misplaced syrupy ballad to ruin the groove. The winning streak continues. [The U.S. version, released in early March of 2002, included the hidden tracks "Boy" and "Butterfly" -- a B-side and Light Years album track, respectively.] © Chris True /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 6, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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The cover of Kylie Minogue's 15th album lets you know that, after a foray into country pop with 2018's Golden, the dance-floor queen is back—shellacked with turquoise eyeshadow and fire engine red lipstick, decked out in Studio 54 curls and chandelier earrings, and lit by disco-ball sparkle. Largely recorded at her London home during 2020's pandemic lockdown restrictions, DISCO is escapist fantasy. Feel-good music. Audio oxytocin. Opener "Magic" is a joyous 24-karat breeze of shimmering Phoenix-style synths, thumping percussion, shameless horns and infectious handclaps. The bright tropical brass and sweeping keyboards —not to mention that "whoo-whoo" backing chorus—of "I Love It" is like a shot of Vitamin C. And that's the thing with Minogue: For all that synth, these songs are warm and intimate. Even with talk-box effects, the Daft Punk-esque "Real Groove" ("Got that perfect body/ But she ain't got the moves," coos the eternally youthful 52-year-old) feels superbly human; you can easily imagine crowds happily twirling to the music. Merengue-flavored "Monday Blues" conjures up a street party dance scene and the "Xanadu"-meets-electropop "Say Something" should be the anthem of the pandemic's roller-skating revival. But there's also something appealingly melancholy in the longing of slinky "Miss A Thing"—a FOMO for the world's former "normal": "Come dance with me...I don't want to miss a thing." Yes, please. There are shades of Chic in the funk guitars of "Last Chance," and early Wham! vibes exude from "Where Does The DJ Go?" Meanwhile, "Celebrate You" improbably borrows from Saint Etienne, '60s girl groups, late '90s R&B and playground chants, to delightful effect. At once nostalgic and totally fresh, DISCO taps exactly into the zeitgeist by offering a shot of comfort and aspiration instead of complaints. And when quarantines finally lift and concerts return, we can count on one thing. Minogue’s shows will be dance parties. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Pop - Released December 6, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released November 22, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Step Back In Time: The Definitive Collection is Kylie Minogue’s fourth ‘greatest hits’ release in her career, a testament to her ability to keep producing timeless bangers that blend nostalgic club beats with catchy melodies: pop, plain and simple. Since the beginning of her music career, way back in 1987, Kylie has surfed the wave of different eras of pop: the standard origins of the late 80s, the dance-driven 90s followed by a move towards the inclusion of electro beats in the 2000s and 2010s. Nevertheless, the sound has always remained distinctly Kylie: upbeat, sparkling anthems that are never impossible to dance to. The first twenty-two tracks are dedicated to her most recent, post-millenium hits, highlights including the inescapable Can’t Get You out of My Head, Love at First Sight and Wow, as well as the only new song, New York City. These are closely followed by a nostalgic trip down memory lane with a selection of Kylie’s more disco-infused hits like I Should Be So Lucky, Better the Devil You Know and the track that kickstarted the success of her career, The Loco-Motion. This Expanded edition includes eight more songs from various different previous albums, and finishes off with an F9 Megamix section, on which eighteen of Minogue’s biggest tunes have been edited together into one non-stop, 40-minute-long party mix. Fans of the pop megastar will de delighted with this compilation, which leaves us with only one question: what does Kylie have in store for the 2020s? © Christopher Steele/Qobuz
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Pop - Released June 28, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

2019's double-disc collection Step Back in Time is a fitting tribute to Kylie Minogue that celebrates her 30 years plus of pop stardom. The first CD covers the years between 2000 and 2019; the second tackles 1987 to 1999, when she was part of the Stock-Aitken-Waterman hitmaking machine. During those years, Kylie's image was brightly cheerful, and the songs SAW gave her were both of those things in spades. Taking a spin through the late-'80s/early-'90s SAW years as presented here is like eating candy canes one after the other -- the sugar high is a rush, but it fades fast. Tracks like "I Should Be So Lucky" and "Step Back in Time" are perfect disposable pop, hooky and simple with Kylie's earnestly sweet vocals perched on top like the proverbial cherry on top. It's all good nostalgic fun and Kylie sounds as game as can be, even when she has to take on Kool & the Gang's "Celebration." When she broke away from SAW and struck out on her own, things began to get more interesting, as 1994's dramatic trip-hop ballad "Confide in Me" shows. Kylie sounds grown-up and invested in the songs at last, and it's the start of her chameleonic journey through the charts. The rest of the collection shows her at home singing murder ballads with Nick Cave ("Where the Wild Roses Grow"), rocking out with Robbie Williams on "Kids," casting epic synth pop spells on "All the Lovers," edging gently into R&B territory on "Red Blooded Woman," and jacking the Pet Shop Boys' style on "Your Disco Needs You." She proves adept at all kinds of disco revamps, whether it's the French touch of "Wow," the bouncing disco-pop of "In My Arms," "Slow"'s space disco, or the pumping Euro-disco of "On a Night Like This." She even sounds good tackling pop-country on 2018's "Dancing." Unlike a lot of stars of her stature, Kylie rarely takes over a song with her voice; she chooses instead to meld with the arrangement and, like a skilled actress, becomes one with the sound. The timeless new wave disco hit "Can't Get You Out of My Head" is the perfect example of Kylie, the song and the sound coming together to make magic. This collection shows just how often that happened, especially after she was able to gain control of her own career. There have been quite a few other hits collection throughout the years, and while they display Minogue's talents in fine fashion, this one is truly definitive and essential for anyone who wants to look back on (or discover) her brilliant career. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 4, 1988 | PAL Productions Limited

While the production values on Kylie's debut are dated at best and the tunes are nothing but standard late-'80s Stock-Aitken-Waterman bubblegum, there are some rather endearing qualities to it. Firstly, she shows a lot more personality than the other Stock, et al. frontperson, Rick Astley. Secondly, her cuteness makes these rather vapid tracks bearable. Her cover of "The Loco-Motion" made only small waves in the U.S., but this was the album that launched her career as both pop star and icon in Europe. © Chris True /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 24, 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released April 6, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released November 6, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released July 5, 2010 | Parlophone UK

By time of Kylie Minogue’s eleventh album, 2010's Aphrodite, she had been releasing records for over 20 years. Most artists who’ve stuck around for that long end up rehashing their past catalogs and/or growing stale, but Kylie manages to avoid these fates by constantly working with new collaborators, keeping up on musical trends without pandering to them, and most importantly, never taking herself too seriously. Sure, she’s serious about making great dance music, but she never confuses her status as a pop icon with a desire to send out a message in her music. Aphrodite rarely strays past sweet love songs or happy dance anthems; its deepest message is “everything is beautiful.” You have to credit the songwriters (big names like Jake Shears of Scissor Sisters and Calvin Harris, as well as behind-the-scenes people like Sebastian Ingrosso, and Pascal Gabriel) for tailoring the efforts to Kylie’s strengths. Also on board is exec producer Stuart Price, who puts it all together, giving the record a focused sound that was lacking on her previous record, X, which touched convincingly on a myriad of styles and influences, but which ended up sounding a little scattered. Here the main sound is the kind of glittery disco pop that really is her strong suit. The various producers keep their eyes on the dancefloor throughout, crafting shiny and sleek tracks that sound custom-built to blast out of huge speaker columns. Fortunately for non-club goers, they never pave over the interesting details that make records good for home or headphone listening. The squiggly synths of the massively catchy “All the Lovers,” the sighing background vocals and spiraling harpsichord-esque synths on the ominous "Closer," and the heavenly extended breakdown on “Looking for an Angel” are the kind of hooks that reward repeated listens. While Kylie is fortunate that so many excellent writers and producers are willing to work with her, they are lucky to be working with Kylie too; she can put over a shimmering and funky track like “Can’t Beat the Feeling” with ease, stomp through a dancefloor-filling jam like “Put Your Hands Up” with power, or cruise through a breezy summertime jam like “Better Than Today” with all kinds of laid-back charm. Sure, she’ll never be mistaken for an octave-stretching diva or a vocal powerhouse, but her slightly nasal, girl-next-door vocals serve her needs perfectly. She soars through the songs with just the right blend of emotion and restraint, adding some sass when needed (as on the thumping title track or “Get Outta My Way”) or some quiet melancholy when the mood arises (“Illusion”). This ability to tailor her performance to the song is a rare quality in the pop world of the early 2010s. It may lead people to underestimate Kylie's artistry but really, Aphrodite is the work of someone who knows exactly what her skills are and who to hire to help showcase them to perfection. She and her team have crafted an album that’s both full of songs that could/should hit the upper reaches of the charts, and also a collection of songs that hang together as an album. One of her best, in fact. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 13, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 24, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released July 23, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released August 24, 1992 | PAL Productions Limited

The first disc of this European market Minogue retrospective features the same program as her 2003 BMG Greatest Hits release, but it's coupled here with an alternate remix disc. Of the handful of allegedly previously unreleased tracks, best is a 12" mix of "Better the Devil You Know," and a 2002 remix of "Hand on Your Heart." There's also a perfunctory club/dance redux of "Loco-Motion." Nothing here feels very exclusive, and the shoddy stock photography artwork doesn't help. The official BMG release is a much better option for the casual listener, and it's likely this comp's remixes are readily available to aficionados in other, less after-market places. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 27, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Christmas Music - Released November 25, 2016 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released October 31, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 10, 2000 | Parlophone UK

In 1998, Kylie Minogue was dropped by dance label DeConstruction, and some thought she had committed career suicide. Obviously the backlash of 1997's Impossible Princess taught the diminutive Aussie one important lesson. Sometimes you have to just go with what you know -- go back to basics. And that's just what Minogue has done with 2000's Light Years. Symbolically dropping her last name from the cover, she re-enters the territory that made her great. Granted, with the teen pop movement at its strongest, one could say she just has good timing, but this work is leaps and bounds better than her Stock-Aitken-Waterman work. Light Years is not just another Minogue dance-pop record, but a great collection of disco stylings and Europop kitsch. "Spinning Around" is a fun and string-laden declaration that she may have made a mistake back in 1997, and the Robbie Williams/Guy Chambers-penned "Your Disco Needs You" is probably one of the best dance songs of the '90s. Arguably one of the best disco records since the '70s, Light Years is Minogue comfortable with who she is and what she's good at. © Chris True /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 13, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Kylie Minogue in the magazine
  • Kylie Minogue: over 30 years in the industry
    Kylie Minogue: over 30 years in the industry The Australian megastar returns with an Expanded edition of her greatest hits compilation "Step Back In Time: The Definitive Collection", a non-stop party from start to finish including hits from e...