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Rock - Released October 1, 2001 | Parlophone UK

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Fame can be a fleeting mistress, and nowhere more so than in the land of dance-pop divas. Many are lucky enough to have a hit album, much less two or three. What usually takes a one-hit wonder from the singles charts to career diva lies less in catchy hooks than in a combination of talent and the choice of collaborators. Obviously, the master of this technique is Madonna, whose talent and eye for talent in others has made her not only a worldwide pop sensation, but a worldwide icon. Arguably, running a close second is Kylie Minogue. Starting off as not much more than a female voice for the massively successful Stock, Aitken & Waterman hit factory, she moved on to work with some of the most prominent dance producers of the early '90s, making her one of the most visible pop stars outside of the United States. By 1997, she moved on to working with writers outside the genre. While this may have translated into poor record sales, her motives were in the right place. With 2001's Fever, Minogue combines the disco-diva comeback of the previous year's Light Years with the trend of simple dance rhythms which was prevalent in the teen dance-pop craze of the years surrounding the album's release. While on the surface that might seem like an old dog trying to learn new tricks, Minogue pulls it off with surprising ease. The first single, "Cant Get You Out of My Head," is a sparse, mid-tempo dance number that pulses and grooves like no other she's recorded, and nothing on Light Years was as funky as the pure disco closer of "Burning Up." And while it's hard not to notice her tipping her hat to the teen pop sound (in fact, on this record she works with Cathy Dennis, former dance-pop star and writer/producer for Brit-teen pop group S Club 7) on songs like "Give It to Me" and "Love at First Sight," her maturity helps transcend this limiting tag, making this a very stylish Euro-flavored dance-pop record that will appeal to all ages. Not one weak track, not one misplaced syrupy ballad to ruin the groove. The winning streak continues. [The U.S. version, released in early March of 2002, included the hidden tracks "Boy" and "Butterfly" -- a B-side and Light Years album track, respectively.] ~ Chris True
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Pop - Released June 28, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Step Back in Time: The Definitive Collection is the fifth greatest-hits collection from Australian-British singer/songwriter Kylie Minogue. Featuring songs such as "Spinning Around," "Can't Get You Out of My Head," and "In My Arms," the compilation is released in tandem to celebrate her 30 years as an international pop icon. ~ Rob Wacey
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Pop - Released July 5, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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During her 25-year career in the music biz, Kylie Minogue’s ability to re-invent herself and stay current is rivaled only by Madonna’s. Unlike her American counterpart, though, Kylie’s changes never seem desperate, and everything she does exudes a touch of class that makes her shifts seem far more organic. From chirpy teen popper to indie diva to dance-pop heavyweight, every step she’s taken has made perfect sense and in the process, she’s released some of the best pop records of her era. In 2012, as part of her own look back at the highlights of a long and successful career, Kylie and her band went to Abbey Road studios to run through a selection of her biggest hits and best songs. Joined by an array of backing singers and an orchestra, the songs are re-imagined in ways that bring out the underlying emotions behind the glittery pop facades. Stripping the songs down to their basics and then adding strings on top proves to be very effective, especially on “All the Lovers” or “Hand on Your Heart,” and most of the new arrangements are imaginative and sometime inspired. The piano ballad version of “Better the Devil You Know” works very well, as does the sultry trip-hop take on “Slow,” while the strings and vocals on “I Should Be So Lucky” turn the song into a classy '30s musical showstopper. The most interesting reboot takes place on “Can’t Get You Out of My Head” where the insistent strings push the song along with a tightly coiled electricity that is impossible to resist. The only song that really falls flat is the cutesy, Motown-inspired take on “The Locomotion.” Though Kylie may not have the strongest voice around, she has more than enough charm and understated emotional strength to fill the more intimate arrangements with a solid and exceedingly warm center. The album stands as both as a reminder of all the classic pop songs Kylie has released and of her fearless nature. She’s always been willing to take risks, and despite the initial thought that her music may not stand up to the orchestral treatment, The Abbey Road Sessions is another victory in a career full of them. ~ Tim Sendra
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Pop - Released April 6, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released April 6, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

After a long career full of many course corrections and detours, it seemed like Kylie Minogue was locked into being a shiny, glittery dance pop icon for life. A label change and some personal turmoil in the form of a soul-shattering breakup sent Minogue looking for something new musically. When planning her first album for BMG, a label rep asked if she had ever thought of recording country music in Nashville and she jumped at the chance. For 2018's Golden, Minogue went to Music City, got to work writing songs with some seasoned pros, and ended up co-writing all the songs on the record. It's heartbreaking and uplifting in turn as she makes sense of where her heart has taken her, set to the tune of fiddles, guitars, and woodsy backing vocals along with the more traditional synths, drum machines, and club beats one usually hears on a Minogue album. She and her team of musicians, writers, and producers straddle the line between twang and glitter on just about every song; sometimes, it leans more in favor of line dancing, sometimes the glitter ball takes over, especially on the shimmering "Raining Glitter." Sometimes, like on "Live a Little" or the very hooky single "Dancing," it's the best of both worlds. It's an interesting mix that puts her in line with much of what's happening in mainstream country. Certainly, the difference between most of Golden and, say, Kacey Musgraves' 2018 album is almost non-existent. The amazing thing about the album, and about Minogue, is that she pulls off the country as well as she's pulled off new wave, disco, electro, murder ballads, and everything else she's done in her long career. Her voice may not have the depth of some of the great Nashville singers, but she has tons of personality, and when she cuts loose there's more than a little Dolly Parton in her artistic DNA. She also does a fine job on ballads -- letting the heartbreak flow on "Radio On" and sounding like both Tegan and Sara on "Sincerely Yours." Golden is an odd detour for Minogue, and it's hard to imagine that the record will get much traction on the country side of the equation -- there's a strong chance her less devoted fans might find the new sound a little too much. As an artistic statement, it's pretty darn bold, though, and proves that she's still game for just about anything and able to make whatever she does sound exactly like herself. ~ Tim Sendra
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Pop - Released November 13, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Pop - Released December 11, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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While she released her first album in 1988 and has been an international star for nearly as long, Kylie Minogue never toured the United States until the fall of 2009, when she took her elaborate stage show to America for the first time. Minogue's concert at New York City's Hammerstein Ballroom was recorded for posterity, and Kylie Live in New York captures the Australian pop icon performing 25 songs for an enthusiastic audience; three new studio tracks have been included as a bonus. Selections include "Confide In Me," "Can't Get You Out of My Head," "Like a Drug," "White Diamond," "2 Hearts," and many more. ~ Mark Deming
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Pop - Released July 5, 2010 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released October 31, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 10, 2000 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released December 2, 2016 | PAL Productions Limited

The first disc of this European market Minogue retrospective features the same program as her 2003 BMG Greatest Hits release, but it's coupled here with an alternate remix disc. Of the handful of allegedly previously unreleased tracks, best is a 12" mix of "Better the Devil You Know," and a 2002 remix of "Hand on Your Heart." There's also a perfunctory club/dance redux of "Loco-Motion." Nothing here feels very exclusive, and the shoddy stock photography artwork doesn't help. The official BMG release is a much better option for the casual listener, and it's likely this comp's remixes are readily available to aficionados in other, less after-market places. ~ Johnny Loftus
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Pop - Released October 24, 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released March 6, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released January 19, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released October 15, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released December 17, 2008 | Parlophone UK

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The simple problem with Kylie the Queen of Disco's first remix collection is not that it's bad, because it isn't. It's that it could -- and should -- be better. For example, take the opening track, the genius 2002 mash-up "Can't Get Blue Monday Out of My Head." It's an absolutely wonderful combination of two great songs -- but who among Kylie's fans doesn't already own this? It's followed by the "Death Metal Disco Scene" mix of "In My Arms," one of only two songs appearing here twice ("Can't Get You" being the other). Unfortunately, DMDS' take is incredibly dull and repetitive, heavy on the looping and not much else. (Sebastien Leger's mix, on the other hand, is attractively itchy, and builds nicely to some tech-ish fun.) By and large, Boombox's biggest shortfall is that many of the mixes chosen just aren't that hot. "Love at First Sight" is represented by the "Kid Creme Vocal Dub," which includes almost none of Kylie's vocal. Sure, it's a dub, but come on -- this album's big draw is supposed to be Kylie! This isn't to say there's nothing good here: Chemical Brothers' marvelous, widescreen take on "Slow" still conquers, and Fischerspooner turn Kylie multi-orgasmic on a "Come into My World" remix that bears a bit of their own "Emerge" in its DNA. Overall, however, Boombox is a sadly prime example of a colossally missed opportunity. ~ Thomas Inskeep
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Pop - Released December 2, 2016 | PAL Productions Limited

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Pop - Released May 3, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released June 25, 2010 | Parlophone UK