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Concertos - Released February 12, 2021 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Riga-born Ksenija Sidorova is today one of the most eminent global ambassadors of the classical accordion. She has proudly borne the colours of her instrument in appearances in the world’s leading halls and with the foremost orchestras. Here she pays homage to Piazzolla in her own way: ‘Piazzolla the revolutionary, the ground-breaker, a man thinking ahead of his time ... Playing this repertoire gave me a sense of artistic freedom and ignited my belief in advocacy of my instrument. For this album, I wanted to celebrate Piazzolla the innovator by pairing some his masterworks with pieces written by other composers for classical accordion, the majority of which I have premiered in recent years. Being of Russian heritage, I couldn’t help noticing the similarity between the nostalgia of the tango and that of Russian composer Sergey Voitenko’s "Revelation". French accordionist-composer Franck Angelis’s Fantasia is based on Piazzolla’s Waltz-tango, and the programme is completed by the Nocturne of Italian accordionist-composer Pietro Roffi and a piece by Sergey Akhunov’. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Concertos - Released June 1, 2013 | Champs Hill Records

This is Ksenija’s second album for Champs Hill Records and combines old and new repertoire; transcriptions and original works. Ksenija says: “As an accordionist you sort of have to carve your own path, so I consider it my mission in this way to introduce the instrument to a wider audience”. The Fairy Tales concerto by Vaclav Trojan recorded with BBC NOW, is written in an approachable style with beautiful heartfelt melodies. The disc includes arrangements and transcriptions of virtuosic showpieces including Moszowski’s Caprice Espagnol, the Scherzo from Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream (a transcription that has its roots in Rachmaninov’s arrangement) and Grieg’s Holberg Suite. A contemporary composition Who’s the Puppet ? written for Ksenija by Russian composer Artem Vassiliev and Petr Londonov’s Scherzo-Toccata, a popular piece with accordionists, but little-known to wider concert audiences, showcase the accordion’s expressive and dramatic powers. For the final bonus track on the album Ksenija and the orchestra are joined by rising star violinist Thomas Gould for a sensitive performance of Piazzolla’s Oblivion. “These two young musicians showed what they can do, and what can be done, with their instruments. In so doing, they repurified our cluttered world of ordered sound.” (The Observer). All the music is performed on Ksenija’s Pigini accordion, which she considers to be the Rolls Royce of instruments.
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Classical - Released August 23, 2011 | Champs Hill Records

Latvian accordionist Ksenija Sidorova offers a disclaimer: "It will probably be a while before the phrase 'I play the classical accordion' doesn't sound unusual or funny!" But she has taken a big step toward legitimizing the instrument with this release from Britain's Champs Hill label. It avoids the twin poles that have characterized much of the classical accordion music that has appeared thus far: music influenced by the jazz avant-garde on one hand, and reworked folk styles on the other. Sidorova offers two types of music: contemporary compositions for accordion and arrangements of Baroque and Classical keyboard works. The listener will be struck by how well the whole program holds together and how well executed Sidorova's arrangements are; hearing transcriptions of Bach, Mozart, and Domenico Scarlatti after works by Luciano Berio and Norwegian composer Arne Nordheim, you feel as though you're hearing the music in a new way. This isn't due just to the fact of the accordion's novelty: Sidorova shapes the music from Bach's Overture in the French style, BWV 831, into registral layers that reflect the sort of construction to which the modern composers naturally turn. The accordion can sustain tones and inflect their textures while doing so, and Nordheim's opening work Flashing and Berio's Sequenza XIII, both influenced by electronic music, make primary use of this ability. After that, you can't help but hear Bach and Mozart in those terms. With the exception of Alfred Schnittke's Revis Fairy Tale, an arrangement of music from the ballet Esquisses (via several intermediate steps), Sidorova sticks with a combination of modern music originally for accordion and standard-repertoire music arranged for it. Sample the bonus track, a movement from Astor Piazzolla's swan song Five Tango Sensations for bandoneón and string quartet, to experience Sidorova's very expressive playing. A real treat for any fan of the accordion or for anyone who has considered the interesting question of how an instrument becomes established in classical repertoire; as Sidorova points out, a century ago nobody considered the guitar a classical instrument either, despite its glorious past. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
This release by accordionist Ksenija Sidorova is a bit difficult to classify, and therein lies its considerable appeal. It contains tunes from Bizet's Carmen, some of the most familiar tunes in the entire classical repertory. The accordion, an instrument on the fringes of the tradition, cannot help but evoke the strolling musicians of a century ago who might have made a living by playing operatic hits just like these. Yet the album is not a contemporary crossover release, nor one bringing nostalgia for the east European cafes of a century ago. Get past the novelty and you'll find a striking variety of treatments of Bizet's music. Sidorova is accompanied by no fewer than three ensembles: a chamber wind-and-string group called Nuevo Mundo, a trio of piano, guitar, and percussion, and the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra, candidly touted in the booklet as having "set its sights on becoming an orchestra of the finest calibre" (it may be that they're already there). You might think the musical results would be all over the map, but the mix of slinky accordion, jazz-like percussion, and careful chamber arrangements of Bizet's tunes holds together. Credit may go to musical director and pianist Michael Abramovich, but it accrues as well to Sidorova, who has both the chops and the attitude to pull off a project that's fun and sexy, sure, but also bracing and novel. © James Manheim /TiVo