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Soul/Funk/R&B - Released April 6, 1993 | Jive

The reputation of Boogie Down Productions leader KRS-One began to slip in the early '90s as he spent more time educating than performing. He hit back at his critics with the slamming Return of the Boom Bap, his first official solo release. Leaving behind the detailed production of the last BDP album, Sex and Violence, Boom Bap returns the MC to the spare, gritty territory of Criminal Minded. KRS-One sounds reinvigorated, as well, spitting out his rhymes with fury and intelligence. Although the record isn't as didactic as Edutainment or Sex and Violence, KRS-One hasn't made his lyrics simplistic, nor has he abandoned his cutting, intelligent social commentary. The combination of hard, basic beats and exciting rhymes makes Return of the Boom Bap a genuine comeback for KRS-One, one of the founding figures of modern hip-hop. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Soul/Funk/R&B - Released November 7, 1995 | Jive

For his second solo album, KRS-One worked with a variety of younger hip-hop talents, perhaps in an attempt to resuscitate his street credibility and his commercial standing. Featuring appearances by Das EFX, Mad Lion, Fat Joe, and Channel Live, KRS-One is loaded with fresh talent of the first rank and they help spark the Teacher into giving an inspired performance. The album also showcases a bit fuller production than Return of the Boom Bap, but that doesn't mean he has sold it out -- it just means he's continuing to experiment, which is one of the reasons KRS-One remained a vital artist nearly a decade after his first record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Soul/Funk/R&B - Released May 20, 1997 | Jive

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 22, 2000 | Jive - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 24, 2001 | eOne Music

With The Sneak Attack, KRS-One, the self-proclaimed "God" of hip-hop, has returned after a four-year sabbatical to reclaim his spot as hip-hop's moral conscience. It's evident that KRS' cocky swagger has not suffered during his prolonged hiatus. He remains the staunchest advocate of his lyrical skills, as illustrated by the boastful barbs of the MC-bashing "Hot," as well as "Attendance," where KRS gleefully details his list of accomplishments ("I'm the teacher, but you still can't see/'Cause while you respected Tupac, Tupac respected me"). KRS' passion still resonates and his philosophies remain cutting-edge. The musical accompaniment of "Sneak Attack," spearheaded largely by KRS' brother, Kenny Parker, lacks the unrelenting boom-bap that previous collaborators DJ Premier and Showbiz supplied on earlier solo endeavors. However, the Blastmaster's knowledge still reigns supreme, as the socially conscious sermons he delivers on "I Will Make It" and "Why" still leave an indelible mark. Though KRS' lyrical attacks are less enthralling then his "My Philosophy" heyday, he is still passionate about the culture of hip-hop, and his self-affirming messages convey that. Trying to reprogram -- or simply reach -- America's youth is a daunting task, but at least there are still a handful of MCs around like KRS-One, who are still willing to try. Class is still in session! © Matt Conaway /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 25, 2006 | X-Ray Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 15, 2009 | Duck Down Music Inc.

With old-school legend KRS-One teaming with Boot Camp Clik member Buckshot, you can expect high-caliber rhymes and an anti-sellout attitude, but Survival Skills is a diverse, welcome surprise. The radio-friendly, and more importantly, radio-worthy single "The Way I Live" with Mary J Blige is a slicker package than usual from this revolutionary duo, but the polished production is actually from Black Milk, an underground tastemaker who provides a beat right in line with the ambitious spirit of the album. The guest list is an unexpected mix of Slug, K'naan, Pharoahe Monch, Sean Price, and reggae singer Bounty Killer, while production is ably handled by the likes of Nottz, 9th Wonder, Ill Mind, and Mobb Deep's Havoc. It's Havoc who outshines them all on the key cut "Robot," an anti-Auto-Tune track with a massive hook and KRS shaking the stick at the younger generation with the usual disgust ("Go online, look up Kraftwerk/Everything you doin' is past work/We already wore that hat, those pants, and that shirt"). Buckshot is hardly a household name and KRS-One's post-2000 discography is alienating with too many releases, but casual fans of more literate hip-hop should check Survival Skills since it's easily accessible and rewarding at the same time. Loyal hip-hop heads with a taste for the old-school boom-bap shouldn't think twice and won't be disappointed. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 1997 | Jive - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 19, 2012 | 6.8.2 Records Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 29, 2012 | 6.8.2 Records Inc.

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Pop - Released March 1, 1993 | Jive - Legacy

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Soul/Funk/R&B - Released December 3, 2010 | Jive - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released July 13, 2004 | Grit Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 27, 2002 | eOne Music

KRS-One found himself in a war of words in 2002, as the young prince of mainstream hip-hop Nelly sought out a battle of epic proportions; little did he know what he had gotten himself into. Although KRS-One has built a reputation for releasing quality, reggae-tinged hip-hop over the last decade, on The Mix Tape he allows his thoughts to be shared with the masses, including the sensational retaliation on "Ova Here." While the album is 13 tracks long, there is very little material actually offered up, as more or less the intended goal was to release the lead single as soon as possible and let KRS-One's opinions be aired. Even with his scathing assessment of the current rap scene, this respected MC handles himself with dignity and class, using his intelligence to spark the war of words instead of his ego. As of such, The Mix Tape is a great, albeit brief, trip through the mind of KRS-One, and a thoroughly enjoyable listen. © Jason D. Taylor /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 25, 2006 | EV Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 24, 2003 | eOne Music

Presumably tired of high-profile feuds with the likes of hip-hop superstar Nelly and public excoriation of the rap scene in general, the legendary KRS-One gets back to business on KRISTYLES. When you've been around for as long as this former Boogie Down Productions member, you're able to examine the world from an effective vantage point, and that's just what KRS-One does here. Atop visceral but never over-elaborate backing, the hip-hop pioneer combines trenchant philosophical insights with street-real scenarios on tracks that both inform and inspire. © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 15, 2014 | Nervous Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 25, 2006 | X-Ray Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 6, 2011 | Fat Beats Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 26, 2018 | Funtime Productions