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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | Concord Records

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The title For the Girls makes plain Kristin Chenoweth's intentions for her 2019 album for Concord: she's saluting great women singers by covering songs they popularized. Chenoweth cherrypicks selections from different genres and eras, sometimes not strictly following her own guidelines. Eva Cassidy covered "It Doesn't Matter Anymore" and Linda Ronstadt cut "Desperado" in 1973, but it's hard to not to think of the tunes as belonging to anyone but their respective authors, Buddy Holly and the Eagles. This is hardly much of a flaw, though, especially since both songs belong within the classic modern pop tradition Chenoweth essays throughout For the Girls. She touches upon R&B, country, the Great American Songbook, and girl groups, inviting Dolly Parton to duet with her on "I Will Always Love You," singing with Ariana Grande on Lesley Gore's "You Don't Own Me," and drafting Jennifer Hudson and Reba McEntire for a show-stopping "I'm a Woman." It's a diverse roster of singers and songs, but the Steve Tyrell production smooths over any rough edges, and Chenoweth's consummate Broadway professionalism helps the whole record seem unified; it's a modern update on the kind of albums Barbra Streisand and Dionne Warwick were making at the twilight of the '60s. The blend of nostalgic vibes and contemporary sheen is appealing, particularly because Chenoweth never pushes too hard: she's not reinventing the songs, she's relaxing with them, and it makes for a warm bath of a listen. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Concord Records

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Jazz - Released January 31, 2001 | Sony Classical

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Pop/Rock - Released September 9, 2011 | Masterworks

Having already won an Emmy for her stints in Pushing Daises and Glee, and a Tony Award for her leading roles in You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown and Wicked, Broadway veteran Kristin Chenoweth could well have to make room on her mantelpiece for a Grammy with her fourth studio album, Some Lessons Learned. Eschewing the musical standards of her 2001 debut, Let Yourself Go and the Christian AOR of 2005's As I Am (although the latter's "Borrowed Angels" does appear here in a slightly altered version), the follow-up to her holiday-themed A Lovely Way to Spend Christmas, sees the versatile singer/actress instead go back to her roots on 13 tracks inspired by the country songs she used to sing while growing up in Oklahoma. It's a change in direction which perfectly suits her distinctive nasal twang, especially on the more uptempo numbers, such as the tongue-in-cheek search for unconditional love of "I Want Somebody (Bitch About)," the radio-friendly Shania Twain-esque "What More Do You Want," and the jaunty, old-fashioned honky tonk of "I Didn't." But unsurprisingly, she's just as adept on the slower numbers, as she emotively croons her way through the gentle, steel guitar-laden "God and Me," the fingerpicking acoustics of "Fathers and Daughters," and the faithful cover of Carrie Underwood's "Lessons Learned." Recorded in Nashville with producer Bob Ezrin (Pink Floyd, Peter Gabriel), in between her performances in the Broadway revival of Promises, Promises, Chenoweth, perhaps understandably, occasionally fails to leave her show tune background behind, particularly on the soft rock power ballads "I Was Here" and "What If We Never," which sound like the kind of show stoppers Kurt and Rachel would belt out at the end of a Glee episode. But the spirit of childhood hero Dolly Parton is never far behind, as evident on an affectionate, lilting rendition of "Change" (from her 1996 album Something Special) and "What Would Dolly Do?," a self-penned tribute to the country icon packed with toe-tapping rhythms, doo wop vocals, and rockabilly riffs. Her most high-profile release to date, Some Lessons Learned is a convincing first attempt to embrace the mainstream, which suggests that Chenoweth can now add authentic country-pop singer to the list of her many talents. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Concord Records

Given Kristin Chenoweth's status as one of the great Broadway stars of the 21st century, it's a little surprising that she hadn't recorded an album of popular standards until 2016's The Art of Elegance. Teaming with producer Steve Tyrell, Chenoweth tackles 12 chestnuts from the Great American Song Book, adding the Tyrell original "You're My Saving Grace" as the album's coda. Lightly swinging and immaculately mannered The Art of Elegance is indeed elegant, an album crafted for the cocktail hour or perhaps a romantic evening that wraps up before the 10 o'clock hour. That's its charm: Chenoweth keeps her power in reserve, gliding through these familiar melodic phrases with ease, and she's matched by Tyrell, who prefers to keep his arrangements crisp and warmly nostalgic. Such soft aesthetics may mean that The Art of Elegance doesn't grab attention, but it wasn't designed to, either. It's meant as a valentine to a bygone era -- whether that's the time when these songs were originally written, or when they were revived in the mid-20th century is a matter of debate, one that doesn't need to be settled because this is a lovely little record by any measure. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2014 | Concord Records

The "home" in Kristin Chenoweth's Coming Home is her hometown of Broken Arrow, the Oklahoma town where she was raised. She returned to Broken Arrow, where there is now a Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center complete with a Kristin Chenoweth Theater, to give a concert that told her story through song, and that is the basis for this 2014 set, which is her first live album. Strictly speaking, not all of these songs have been recorded by her before, nor were they necessarily part of Broadway musicals starring her. Instead, Chenoweth chooses songs she sang as a child, songs that were instrumental in her stylistic and aesthetic development, songs she's always loved and then songs that made her name, including a clutch of tunes from Wicked. A few curve balls are thrown, particularly in the form of Donna Summer's disco classic "No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)" and Dolly Parton's "Little Sparrow," which is just enough to suggest the spunk and mischief that are crucial to Chenoweth's charm. Nevertheless, the real selling point is her virtuosity and versatility, both of which are on display here in what may be her most complete record to date. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Classical - Released March 28, 2005 | Sony Classical

Kristin Chenoweth's 2001 album was a collection of standards that showcased her winning soprano and remarkable ability to shift from Broadway brassy to "My Funny Valentine" sultry at the turn of a note. Let Yourself Go was a great follow-up to her 1999 Tony win for You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. But since then Chenoweth has branched out from Broadway, particularly into acting (she joined the cast of West Wing in 2004), and As I Am reflects her higher profile. It's a personal album that mixes country and adult contemporary instrumentation in a set featuring hymnal book standards and contemporary Christian favorites. Chenoweth herself is pictured in relaxed cotton separates -- every bit the attractive, approachable celebrity -- and there isn't a Broadway tune in the bunch. As I Am begins with "It Will Be Me." A pedal steel helps the 1999 Faith Hill tune retain its country-pop feel, but there's also a slickness suitable to Chenoweth's flawless vocal. "Because He Lives" has a similar modern country sheen, while "Joyful, Joyful"'s rich arrangement for strings and piano gives the vocalist a stage for a little of that Broadway expression. Diane Warren's pristine "Borrowed Angels" is destined for lite FM radio, and Chenoweth dedicates "There Will Never Be Another" to Amy Grant. Though its slickness is suited to the material, As I Am can also seem to flutter inside its own perfect globe, untouched by the elements and radiant as Chenoweth's golden hair. That's why a version of the traditional "Poor, Wayfaring Stranger" is so refreshing with its warm B-3 tones and subtly expressive vocal, and the fun closer "Taylor, the Latte Boy" -- about Kristin's crush on her Starbucks barista -- is so important. These songs further personalize As I Am; they add a layer of realness to its shiny dedications of faith. ~ Johnny Loftus
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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | Concord Records

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2008 | Sony Classical

Best known for her appearances in Broadway musicals and her television show KRISTIN, Kristin Chenoweth is an actress and singer who has also enjoyed a career as a recording artist. A LOVELY WAY TO SPEND CHRISTMAS (2008) finds the classically trained vocalist giving her renditions of contemporary Christmas songs (“I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” “Silver Bells”) and traditional fare (“What Child is This?”). Those already familiar with Chenoweth’s refined soprano will find much to appreciate on this elegant holiday release.
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Pop/Rock - Released September 2, 2011 | Masterworks

Pop - Released May 31, 2011 | Masterworks Broadway

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Pop/Rock - Released August 31, 2012 | Masterworks

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Pop - Released January 1, 2014 | Concord Records

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Country - Released April 15, 2012 | Elektra Nashville

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Country - Released April 8, 2012 | Elektra Nashville

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Country - Released March 18, 2012 | Elektra Nashville