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Alternative & Indie - Released January 23, 2015 | Sunday Best

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The third full-length album from Kitty, Daisy & Lewis, 2015's fittingly titled The Third, showcases more of the group's rootsy yet stylistically wide-ranging mix of rockabilly, ska, vintage-style R&B, and quirky old-school pop. The album follows the group's acclaimed 2011 effort, Smoking in Heaven, and features production from the Clash's Mick Jones. Early on in Kitty, Daisy & Lewis' career, the British siblings (whose parents are noted producer/guitarist Graeme Durham and former Raincoats drummer Ingrid Weiss) exhibited a penchant for covering classic rockabilly and country songs, a talent that got them pegged as a traditionalist or even revivalist roots band. The fact that they also looked the part in vintage '50s clothes, and eked out their charming lo-fi sound with a mix of acoustic and electric instruments and tube amps, only added to the misconception. Seven years on from their full-length debut, Kitty, Daisy & Lewis appear less as a neo-retro rockabilly or country act (although they certainly touch upon those styles) and more like an astute, genre-bending post-punk band from the '70s or early '80s. Think how Talking Heads combined their love of soul and disco into their own fractured new wave sound and you'll get a good idea of where Kitty, Daisy & Lewis are coming from. Which isn't to say that they aren't still a little bit rootsy -- or that they sound anything like Talking Heads, for that matter. On the contrary, cuts like the '60s ska-sounding "Baby Bye Bye" and the vintage Chicago blues-inflected "It Ain't Your Business" are devilishly purist in their execution, but still feel markedly current. Similarly, listen to the punk-funk thump of "Bitchin' in the Kitchen" or the roiling boogie-blues of "Feeling of Wonder" and your mind begins intersecting images of a '40s juke joint with a '70s basement punk show. Perhaps the best example of the trio's decade-crossing talent is "No Action," a wicked, sinewy, piano and string-driven feature for drummer/vocalist Kitty that simultaneously calls to mind the Vaselines, Amy Winehouse, and Nile Rodgers. Which is why bringing Jones on board ends up making so much sense. From his early days in the '70s D.I.Y. scene to his early-'80s reign with the Clash to his dub, dance, and electronic-infused years during the '90s and onward with Big Audio Dynamite, Jones has forged multiple careers by fusing disparate yet compatible musical styles together to make wholly new yet comfortably recognizable pop music. Ultimately, that's exactly what Kitty, Daisy & Lewis have done here. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 2017 | Sunday Best

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After three albums of mashing up rockabilly, jump blues, boogie, R&B, and ska, the sibling trio Kitty, Daisy & Lewis made a couple of big changes. For 2017's Superscope, they took over the production chores themselves. While they had a fine time working with ex-Clash guitarist Mick Jones on Third, they wanted autonomy. They also subtracted a vital element from their hybrid sound, giving ska the boot entirely this time around. The first change didn't make too much difference in the end product. The trio was never very slick or over-produced in the past, and the slight home-cooked feel of Superscope isn't a stretch. The lack of ska is a little more important, since it takes away some of the unpredictable fun and craziness that worked like a sucker punch on previous albums. This time, things feel a little more matured and buttoned-up, less like a whirlwind of influences coming together to make a unique sound. Each song sticks to a particular genre and digs in deep, like on the 12-bar blues of "You're So Fine" or the jazz-funk "Slave." The songs feel a bit like genre exercises instead of artistic or emotional expressions. The singing and playing on the soul-ballad-with-strings "Love Me So" feel very timid and underdone, the slow blues "Just One Kiss" sounds like a non-winning audition for The Voice, and the instrumental that ends the album is Soul-Jazz 101 at best. Only a few moments capture the devil-may-care energy and fun of their earlier work; the best is the rocker "Black Van," which really rumbles and jumps with strong vocals, some disco bass in the chorus, and a tough-as-black-fingernails hook. The fuzz-laced rockabilly punk stomper "The Game Is On" comes close, sounding like a cleaned-up Thee Headcoatees track. Apart from these two blasts of energy -- the couple of times Kitty, Daisy & Lewis show that they still have some life in them -- the trio seems to have run out of gas and appears to be playing it safe for the most part. They just need more focus, and maybe a producer to coax stronger performances out of them. As it is, Superscope is Kitty, Daisy & Lewis' weakest album to date and shows an alarming drop in quality. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Rockabilly - Released May 30, 2011 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rockabilly - Released July 28, 2008 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rockabilly - Released January 23, 2015 | Sunday Best Recordings

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The third full-length album from Kitty, Daisy & Lewis, 2015's fittingly titled The Third, showcases more of the group's rootsy yet stylistically wide-ranging mix of rockabilly, ska, vintage-style R&B, and quirky old-school pop. The album follows the group's acclaimed 2011 effort, Smoking in Heaven, and features production from the Clash's Mick Jones. Early on in Kitty, Daisy & Lewis' career, the British siblings (whose parents are noted producer/guitarist Graeme Durham and former Raincoats drummer Ingrid Weiss) exhibited a penchant for covering classic rockabilly and country songs, a talent that got them pegged as a traditionalist or even revivalist roots band. The fact that they also looked the part in vintage '50s clothes, and eked out their charming lo-fi sound with a mix of acoustic and electric instruments and tube amps, only added to the misconception. Seven years on from their full-length debut, Kitty, Daisy & Lewis appear less as a neo-retro rockabilly or country act (although they certainly touch upon those styles) and more like an astute, genre-bending post-punk band from the '70s or early '80s. Think how Talking Heads combined their love of soul and disco into their own fractured new wave sound and you'll get a good idea of where Kitty, Daisy & Lewis are coming from. Which isn't to say that they aren't still a little bit rootsy -- or that they sound anything like Talking Heads, for that matter. On the contrary, cuts like the '60s ska-sounding "Baby Bye Bye" and the vintage Chicago blues-inflected "It Ain't Your Business" are devilishly purist in their execution, but still feel markedly current. Similarly, listen to the punk-funk thump of "Bitchin' in the Kitchen" or the roiling boogie-blues of "Feeling of Wonder" and your mind begins intersecting images of a '40s juke joint with a '70s basement punk show. Perhaps the best example of the trio's decade-crossing talent is "No Action," a wicked, sinewy, piano and string-driven feature for drummer/vocalist Kitty that simultaneously calls to mind the Vaselines, Amy Winehouse, and Nile Rodgers. Which is why bringing Jones on board ends up making so much sense. From his early days in the '70s D.I.Y. scene to his early-'80s reign with the Clash to his dub, dance, and electronic-infused years during the '90s and onward with Big Audio Dynamite, Jones has forged multiple careers by fusing disparate yet compatible musical styles together to make wholly new yet comfortably recognizable pop music. Ultimately, that's exactly what Kitty, Daisy & Lewis have done here. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rockabilly - Released April 18, 2011 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 16, 2018 | Sunday Best

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 16, 2017 | Sunday Best

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Rockabilly - Released July 7, 2008 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rockabilly - Released April 10, 2013 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rockabilly - Released December 15, 2008 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rock - Released October 23, 2011 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 26, 2017 | Sunday Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 4, 2014 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rock - Released June 20, 2011 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 30, 2017 | Sunday Best

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Rock - Released June 22, 2015 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rock - Released December 4, 2014 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rock - Released February 23, 2015 | Sunday Best Recordings

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Rock - Released September 4, 2006 | Sunday Best Recordings