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Country - Released May 29, 2020 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released September 8, 2017 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released November 16, 2018 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released August 21, 2015 | MCA Nashville

Kip Moore scored three big bro country hits in the two years surrounding 2012 –- "Somethin' 'Bout a Truck" was the 2011 breakthrough, followed by "Beer Money" in 2012 and "Hey Pretty Girl" in 2013 -- but he struggled on the journey to his second album, delivering two singles that, in his words, "stiffed," leading him to scrap an entire LP and write a new record, presumably one that's more commercial. Wild Ones, delivered three years after Up All Night, is that official second record and, as the neon-speckled album cover indicates, it's an album indebted to the '80s and not the hybrid of Hall & Oates and Paul Young suggested by the art, either. Moore plays up his middle-America bona fides, eager to conjure some of the spirit of fellow Springsteen fan Eric Church, but where Church prefers beefy guitars, Moore favors open-road anthems, songs that feel masculine but retain a vulnerable core. Such an emphasis on ballads and deliberate midtempo rockers gives Wild Ones a soft, even hazy touch when compared to the glossy snap of Up All Night, a shift that neatly punctures whatever lingering bro country affections remain in Moore's music. Instead of living for tomorrow's parties, he's rhapsodizing about good times once had in a style that funnels prime Bon Jovi through John Mellencamp. If Kip's songs aren't as hook-heavy or as sticky as his idols, it is nevertheless admirable that he's completely revamped his sound so he doesn't feel like anybody else in contemporary country -- not his bro country peers, not Church, not a red dirt refugee or macho rocker. He's effectively evoked the feel and aesthetic of mid-'80s heartland rock, and if that doesn't necessarily make him a wild one, it does make him a rebel of sorts. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released February 16, 2015 | MCA Nashville

Like so many country singers from the Music City, Kip Moore got started as a songwriter, penning tunes for the duo Thompson Square. Moore displays a certain commercial savvy throughout his 2012 debut, Up All Night, sculpting his tunes with care, polishing them until they gleam, writing about all the things country boys love -- faith, pretty girls, beer money, and partying -- throwing them all together in his hit single "Somethin' 'Bout a Truck," a song that could happily double as an advertisement for either beer or trucks. That kind of commercialism is alternately alienating and alluring: the machinations behind the music are so transparent that it's a bit off-putting, yet the album is executed so well it can nevertheless suck you in against your will. It's big and bright, shameless in its attempt to win you over, and -- given increased exposure -- that eager-to-please nature winds up ingratiating whether you like it or not. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released August 9, 2019 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | MCA Nashville

Like so many country singers from the Music City, Kip Moore got started as a songwriter, penning tunes for the duo Thompson Square. Moore displays a certain commercial savvy throughout his 2012 debut, Up All Night, sculpting his tunes with care, polishing them until they gleam, writing about all the things country boys love -- faith, pretty girls, beer money, and partying -- throwing them all together in his hit single "Somethin' 'Bout a Truck," a song that could happily double as an advertisement for either beer or trucks. That kind of commercialism is alternately alienating and alluring: the machinations behind the music are so transparent that it's a bit off-putting, yet the album is executed so well it can nevertheless suck you in against your will. It's big and bright, shameless in its attempt to win you over, and -- given increased exposure -- that eager-to-please nature winds up ingratiating whether you like it or not. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Country - Released October 28, 2016 | MCA Nashville

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Released in the autumn of 2016, just over a year after Wild Ones and while Kip Moore was working on a new album, the Underground EP contains two new studio cuts and three live performances of unrecorded songs. All five follow through on the muscular heartland swagger of 2015's Wild Ones and, in a few places, there are explicit connections to Moore's influences: "All Time Low" nods at Waylon Jennings and "Midnight Slow Dance" is a dead ringer for Darkness on the Edge of Town Springsteen. Such hero worship doesn't restrain Moore; it emboldens him. If his growl can sometimes seem affected, the music is lean and sinewy, some of the best he's made. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released March 27, 2020 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released September 8, 2017 | MCA Nashville

"Practice makes perfect" is a cliché, but it suits Kip Moore. He first essayed his update of heartland rock in 2012, polishing it with a hefty dose of bro-country swagger that earned him a few big hits, including the number one "Somethin' 'Bout a Truck," but he didn't strike the right balance on Wild Ones, a 2015 sequel that found him striving to achieve the cavernous music of the '80s. Delivered just two years later, Slowheart is the record Moore has been attempting to make all along: a big-sounding, big-hearted album that's as much Midwestern rock as it is modern country. Moore made this progression by taking the reins into his own hands, seizing control of the production, and co-writing all but two of the record's 13 songs, with the remaining two brought to him by songwriter Luke Dick. All this means Slowheart is an auteurist album, one driven by Moore's sense of self, and he winds up precisely articulating his blend of arena country and AOR. Slowheart strips back some of the gloss of Wild Ones without renouncing the idea of studio polish. Indeed, Moore undergirds his soaring guitars with a brawny rhythm section, one that helps pound home the beats of "Plead the Fifth" and "Fast Women" but is limber enough to swing on "Just Another Girl." The latter is just one cut that showcases his playfulness, his good cheer reaching a pinnacle on "I've Been Around" -- the hookiest melody here serving a playful lyric -- but threaded throughout the album. Slowheart may sound tougher than either of its predecessors, but Moore also appears appealingly bruised, patching himself up after suffering a series of broken hearts and disappointments. He's not wallowing in his misery, he's brushing himself off and moving forward, and this weathered sensitivity when combined with the music's full-throated roar gives Slowheart a soul uncommon in contemporary country. Moore isn't a bro-country goofball or a dour revivalist: he's a passionate true believer in the redeeming power of loud guitars and sturdy songs, and Slowheart is proof he can deliver what he preaches. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released November 16, 2018 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released March 1, 2019 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released August 21, 2015 | MCA Nashville

Kip Moore scored three big bro country hits in the two years surrounding 2012 –- "Somethin' 'Bout a Truck" was the 2011 breakthrough, followed by "Beer Money" in 2012 and "Hey Pretty Girl" in 2013 -- but he struggled on the journey to his second album, delivering two singles that, in his words, "stiffed," leading him to scrap an entire LP and write a new record, presumably one that's more commercial. Wild Ones, delivered three years after Up All Night, is that official second record and, as the neon-speckled album cover indicates, it's an album indebted to the '80s and not the hybrid of Hall & Oates and Paul Young suggested by the art, either. Moore plays up his middle-America bona fides, eager to conjure some of the spirit of fellow Springsteen fan Eric Church, but where Church prefers beefy guitars, Moore favors open-road anthems, songs that feel masculine but retain a vulnerable core. Such an emphasis on ballads and deliberate midtempo rockers gives Wild Ones a soft, even hazy touch when compared to the glossy snap of Up All Night, a shift that neatly punctures whatever lingering bro country affections remain in Moore's music. Instead of living for tomorrow's parties, he's rhapsodizing about good times once had in a style that funnels prime Bon Jovi through John Mellencamp. If Kip's songs aren't as hook-heavy or as sticky as his idols, it is nevertheless admirable that he's completely revamped his sound so he doesn't feel like anybody else in contemporary country -- not his bro country peers, not Church, not a red dirt refugee or macho rocker. He's effectively evoked the feel and aesthetic of mid-'80s heartland rock, and if that doesn't necessarily make him a wild one, it does make him a rebel of sorts. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2014 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released May 10, 2019 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released March 27, 2020 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released May 29, 2020 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2013 | MCA Nashville