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Jazz - Released May 29, 2020 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released September 7, 2018 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released June 3, 2016 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released May 22, 2006 | Shanachie

Reedman Kim Waters is all about the quiet storm on his R&B-infused From the Heart. Showcasing his calm, sweet saxophone tone over hummable melodies, Waters may not be pushing the smooth jazz envelope, but with such suggestive songs as "Until Dawn" and "Sweet Desire," one gets the sense that it ain't an envelope that needs pushing. Walter Beasley's "Slow Role" is an urban highlight with its mellow wah-wah guitar backgrounds and Waters' laid-back alto lead. In a deft move for a kind of crossover appeal, Waters has Dru Hill member Jazz sing on the excellent ballad "Love Don't Love Nobody." Also dressing up the radio-friendly tracks is the guitar of smooth jazz pro Chuck Loeb. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 20, 2005 | Shanachie

Since the soulful and charismatic saxman signed with Shanachie in 1998, smooth jazz fans have known where to go when they're in the mood for love. Judging from the titles of his hit genre albums Love's Melody, Someone to Love You, In the Name of Love, Kim Waters is in love with love, and he's sticking to this conviction. As strong as he is with slow dance ballads, however, he's been getting funkier in recent years, perhaps inspired by producing some of his label's hip-hop cover projects like Streetwize and Tha Hot Club. All for Love (have we run out of variations yet?) perfectly balances the two, with engaging melodies and a variety of grooves, some edgy and modern, some thumpy and retro, from start to finish. The first radio single was a moody, soul-ambient take on Aretha Franklin's "Daydreaming," which blended singer Maysa's low sultry vocals with Waters' own smoky harmony fills. The title track perfectly epitomizes the easy grooving, old-school soul-tinged romantic side of smooth jazz sax. But it's the more aggressive, optimistic tunes which sell the project as a whole, from the easy grooving soprano-driven opener "She's My Baby" (he's a devoted family man), to the punchy, perky "Happy Feeling." All that love goes to his head and inspires even more daring improvisational energy on "Sideways," and the marvelously mischievous, raw and scratchy -- but still somehow soothing and sensuous -- "Hot Tub." Labelmate and frequent collaborator Chuck Loeb contributed the moody, totally retro "Dream Machine," which features light touches of his rhythm guitar. Waters' smoldering looks and sweet album titles belie the harder grooving charms that have come to define his later works. Yet the romance stays close by as the real partying begins. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 26, 2010 | Shanachie

"'Love Story,' 'This Is It' and 'Reaching Out,' with its disco-jazz groove, are surefire radio hits." © TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 21, 2014 | Shanachie

Booklet
With his smooth and soaring soprano saxophone sound, Kim Waters is adept at merging urban club R&B with smooth jazz, and while his sound has arguably gotten even smoother as his career moves on, his specialty right from the very start of things has been the romantic ballad. This set, first released in 1989, collects a dozen of these ballads drawn from when Waters was recording for Warlock Records before signing with Shanachie Records. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 22, 2006 | Shanachie

Shanachie makes a mighty bold assertion on the CD insert that Kim Waters is the creator of "the sexiest sound in smooth urban jazz." Hype? Not if the saxman lives up beautifully to the billing, and his sound is pretty darn sexy and romantic on the coolest of these ballads. He made his mark on the genre with a supremely gentle soprano sound, and tracks like "You Know That I Love You" (featuring those all-important radio-ready female backing vocals) and "Heaven Sent" blend this dreamy seduction ability with the slickest in modern-meets-retro-soul grooves and ambience. The similarly likeable "Someone to Love You" informs listeners that the sexiness translates perfectly to the alto sax experience. All of that is quite expected from Waters, who never disappoints, but the real fun of this disc is the way Waters is loosening up and extending that love to the dancefloor. "Waterfall" thumps and grinds like an atmospheric disco hit, Waters' alto textures jumping happily over the type of moody rhythmic foundation Joyce Cooling finds so inviting. "The Ride" is a little gentler, falling in between the bedroom eyes and the last dance of the night. The final track, billed as a "bonus," is "Davey D's Penthouse Mix" of "In the House," an even more groove-intensive retro-thumper written and played by Waters and labelmate/guitarist Chuck Loeb. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 20, 2005 | Shanachie

Every once in awhile, in brief outbursts on this predictable smooth date, Kim Waters shows that he can play his horns, hinting at Eddie Harris and Grover Washington, Jr. Unfortunately, You Are My Lady otherwise sticks to repetitive grooves, obvious and mildly soulful saxophone riffs, and endless melody statements. Kim Waters and Chris "Big Dog" Davis play all of the unidentified electronic instruments, with occasional contributions from a guitarist. Since the cover blurb says that this is "The most sensuous CD yet from the Smooth Urban Jazz chart topper," one knows from the start that this is not a creative jazz project and that the performances are meant for romantic backgrounds for couples who prefer repetition, unimaginative music and a complete lack of surprises. The music is always danceable and not a single note would distress a smooth radio programmer. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 27, 1998 | Warlock Records

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Jazz - Released May 22, 2006 | Shanachie

Kim Waters ninth album, Love's Melody was released in 1998 by Shanachie and dedicated to his twin girls. Self-produced with Chuck Loeb, Dino Esposito, Scot Rammer, and David Mann, the CD offers 11 sensitive and enchanting tracks with special guest performances by Chuck Loeb and James Lloyd. In a deviation from Waters' R&B-flavored background, Waters asserts his mastery of the soprano saxophone on this smooth collection of well-crafted tunes. Each composition adds a different dimension to his musical catalog. Lush, poetic rhythms combined with mid-tempo grooves and fresh melodies on songs such as "Nightfall" and "Possession," and assure his success in the contemporary jazz style. Waters' saxophone caters to the senses with the grace of a romantic on the beautiful title track "Love's Melody." His soprano saxophone speaks volumes with the mastery of tone and musicianship that defines the sensual nature of the saxophone. "Two Hearts of Mine," a ballad written for his twins, is compassionate and offers his most personal and intimate song to date. Other well-known works such as "Sunny" and "Midnight at the Oasis" are brilliantly distinct, with Waters lending former renditions fresh breath. The resulting creative ideas offer a splendid showcase of his eloquent, trademark saxophone voice. © Paula Edelstein /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 25, 2011 | Shanachie

The veteran saxophonist isn't known among fans and peers as "the King of Smooth Urban Jazz" for nothing. Over the course of 17 albums, including over a decade's worth with Shanachie, he's been consistent and impeccable in delivering an infectious mix of romantic ballads and funky, thumping dance tunes. This collection, yet another using the words "heart" or "love" in the title, is no exception. It's lighthearted, charming, soulful, and funky, mixing hard-to-resist originals with likable, vocal-laced covers of recent hits by R. Kelly ("Love Letter") and Jay-Z/Alicia Keys ("Empire State of Mind," featuring the soaring vocals of Waters' wife, singer Dana Pope). Two of the most dynamic dance tracks, "The Groove's Alright" and "Running to Love," feature exciting multiple horn textures that would be right at home on a set by the Sax Pack, the trio featuring Jeff Kashiwa and Steve Cole that Waters has also recorded and toured with. For the most part, Waters seems to be cool with just keeping his sweet urban flow rather than breaking any new ground. Tracks like midtempo opener "Heart Seeker" and the soaring dancefloor gems "Free Fall" and "Step to This" (featuring a spirited vocal invitation to join the step dancing movement) are fun and right in the pocket. But a few others find Waters digging just a bit deeper emotionally. He has a well-known propensity for song titles with the word "love," but the kind he's talking about on the passionate closing ballad "Double Two Love" is that of a doting dad to grown twin daughters. The most prominent vocal track, "Am I a Fool," blends a classic '70s soul ballad vibe with the sweet harmonies found in '90s groups -- all led by Calvin Richardson's impassioned quandary about staying in a love affair even if he's not being treated so well. On This Heart of Mine, there's no question that Kim Waters' heart is in the right place -- where it's been for over two decades of solid hitmaking. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 22, 2006 | Shanachie

Smooth jazz wins adherents by sticking to a predictable course, not by innovation. A saxophonist like Kim Waters, then, attracts the label "the #1 saxophonist in Smooth Urban Jazz!" from his ability to bring a silky, straightforward interpretation to both known and new compositions, not by playing like John Coltrane. The opener, "Step in the Name of Love," will be familiar to radio fans from R. Kelly's hit version, while listeners with longer memories will appreciate a new version of Barry White's "Love's Theme." The majority of the material, however, has been written by Waters himself, from the mellow vibes of "Sunset" to the lengthy late-night groove of "All I Wanna Do (Is Please You)." Besides playing saxophone, Waters also helps out with the production and plays a number of other instruments. He's joined by guitarist Wayne Bruce, keyboardist Dave Darlington, and several others, but this is mostly Waters' show. It's only at the end of In the Name of Love that Waters stretches things out a bit, letting Davy D handle a remix of "The Ride." In the Name of Love delivers pretty much what fans have come to expect from Waters and the smooth jazz scene, and should please both fans and radio programmers. © Ronnie D. Lankford Jr. /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 27, 2008 | Shanachie

Since Kim Waters signed with urban jazz mecca Shanachie in the late '90s, genre fans have known where to go when they're in the mood for love. Four of his seven albums have the word in the title, and the others are intensely romantic. Waters' high spirited ride on the love train continues on his eighth Shanachie collection (and 16th overall), which finds him celebrating 20 years as a recording artist by paying homage to one of his biggest all-time influences, legendary soul singer Marvin Gaye. The saxman previously tapped into the Gaye vibe with his vibrant, party-ready cover of "Got to Give It Up." On I Want You, Waters mixes old-school R&B textures and contemporary hip-hop with his trademark, sensual as always playing to fashion a unique kind of tribute. Rather than simply doing a set of Gaye covers, he uses his dreamy, candlelit twist on the title track (featuring the hypnotic vocals of Vivian Green) and a passionate twist on "Distant Lover" as a springboard for nine originals that, as the album subtitle promises, spread true love in the late legend's spirit. Waters can't specifically remember the first Gaye song he ever heard, but he thinks it very well might have been "Let's Get It On." He throws a knowing wink to that romantic benchmark hit -- dubbed one of the "Top Ten Sexy Songs" of all time by Virgin Media -- with his cleverly titled "Let's Get on It," whose catchy, free flowing sax melody rides smoothly over crunchy, handclap percussion. After kickstarting the set with a coolly soulful invitation to "Groove with Me," he goes retro on three key tracks: the candlelit romance "Come with Me," which starts with an old-school Fender Rhodes intro; the bouncy shuffle funk tune "Some Dreams Come True," which mixes a hypnotic clavinet with colorful sax improvisations; and the trippy and playful "Cosmic Love," whose wistful soprano melody is balanced by quirky and spacy old-school keyboard sounds. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 26, 2008 | Warlock Records

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Jazz - Released August 26, 2008 | N-Coded Music

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Jazz - Released June 25, 2013 | Red River Entertainment

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Jazz - Released September 2, 2014 | Red River Entertainment

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Jazz - Released September 4, 2018 | Shanachie

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Rock - Released July 29, 2008 | Warlock Records