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Country - Released July 27, 2018 | Blue Chair Records - Warner Bros.

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There are major milestones during a singer’s career. For his first project with Blues Chair, Kenny Chesney penned a very personal album. Songs For The Saints works as a sort of testimony. In 2017, the popular country star’s house on Saint John Island was devastated by hurricane Irma. A difficult time, shared with other inhabitants, which he had to overcome. Coproduced by Buddy Cammon, the album honours three important figures for Chesney. Ziggy Marley joins him on Love for Love City. A love song for the city devastated by the disaster, coated in percussions reminiscent of island sounds. Then comes Jimmy Buffet’s turn on a more country-style ballad, Trying to Reason With Hurricane Season, and Mindy Smith on Better Boat… Chesney tries to evoke redeeming places that give a strong sense of freedom. Moving and sincere, he uses this album to grieve over these events with a pop, laid-back country music. But Songs For The Saints however isn’t a self-treatment project. Like he stresses on the first eponymous track, Chesney also sings to bring solace and support to other Irma victims. Deprived of pathos and sadness, this opus makes us want to sail towards new horizons, like the album cover unequivocally suggests. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Country - Released July 27, 2018 | Blue Chair Records - Warner Bros.

There are major milestones during a singer’s career. For his first project with Blues Chair, Kenny Chesney penned a very personal album. Songs For The Saints works as a sort of testimony. In 2017, the popular country star’s house on Saint John Island was devastated by hurricane Irma. A difficult time, shared with other inhabitants, which he had to overcome. Coproduced by Buddy Cammon, the album honours three important figures for Chesney. Ziggy Marley joins him on Love for Love City. A love song for the city devastated by the disaster, coated in percussions reminiscent of island sounds. Then comes Jimmy Buffet’s turn on a more country-style ballad, Trying to Reason With Hurricane Season, and Mindy Smith on Better Boat… Chesney tries to evoke redeeming places that give a strong sense of freedom. Moving and sincere, he uses this album to grieve over these events with a pop, laid-back country music. But Songs For The Saints however isn’t a self-treatment project. Like he stresses on the first eponymous track, Chesney also sings to bring solace and support to other Irma victims. Deprived of pathos and sadness, this opus makes us want to sail towards new horizons, like the album cover unequivocally suggests. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Country - Released March 3, 2019 | Blue Chair Records

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Country - Released April 28, 2017 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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Kenny Chesney initially planned his 17th studio album to be a set with the Mellencamp-esque title Some Town Somewhere, but as the album drew closer to its scheduled summer 2016 release, the singer/songwriter decided to revise the record, turning it into Cosmic Hallelujah. Some of the earlier album survives -- "Some Town Somewhere" opens up the second side -- but Cosmic Hallelujah is a decidedly different album than its predecessor, the 2014 set The Big Revival. Much of Cosmic Hallelujah pivots off of the big singalong "American Kids" -- the Shane McAnally co-write that was added to the album at the last minute -- and Chesney also uses the P!nk duet "Setting the World on Fire" as his lodestar, choosing to fill the album with rhythmically savvy country songs that could easily slide onto adult contemporary airwaves. More than that, Chesney chooses to load this album up with songs about the modern condition: "Noise" explicitly tackles the digital overload of the 21st century, while "Trip Around the Sun" opens up the album with a nod to climate change, and "Rich and Miserable" claims that "too much is never too much," an admission that materialism is a dead end. Perhaps Chesney is searching for meaning in his middle age, perhaps he's simply attempting to tap into the shifting zeitgeist -- certainly Cosmic Hallelujah takes the percolating country R&B of Sam Hunt into full account -- but the remarkable thing about the album is that it feels simultaneously restless and faithful, with music that stays true to his buoyant hits as it taps into the melancholy undercurrents that flow through his quiet albums. Cosmic Hallelujah veers toward happy but the subtext can be sad: Chesney recognizes the world is changing, so he does his best to hang on to the things that matter to him, while allowing himself to embrace over-saturated modernity. It seems like it'd be a tricky balance, but the nifty thing about Cosmic Hallelujah is that it plays as if it's a passion project: Chesney is determined to connect with his times without abandoning himself, and the result is one of his best records. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 26, 2000 | BNA Records Label

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Country - Released September 22, 2014 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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As he headed into 2014, Kenny Chesney's career wasn't in need of a revival but after two successive commercial underperformers, it needed a jolt of energy, something The Big Revival provides. Abandoning the sun-bleached intimacy of Life on a Rock, Chesney cranks up the volume on The Big Revival, but it's not so much that the record is loud; rather, it's blazingly bright, crisp, and clean, from its singalong party tunes to its ballads. One of those ballads, "Wild Child," features Grace Potter, the singer who helped take "You and Tequila" high on the charts in 2011, her presence a subtle reminder that Chesney's biggest new millennial hits have been slow songs. Despite this apparent strength, the singer doesn't spend much time in the slow lane on The Big Revival. Most of the record clips along at a brisk pace, often spending time churning out reliable arena-filling anthems, but the record sounds so open that even the deliberate numbers feel expansive. This shift in attitude is entirely reliant on Chesney and his longtime producer Buddy Cannon's decision to supplement their regular stable of songwriters -- Shane McAnally and Rodney Clawson each have multiple credits -- with a few new writers, just enough to give this record a bit of thematic freshness to complement its sound. Chesney remains a bit of a romantic with a fondness for drinking songs, but there are passing references to Bonnaroo and Burning Man while the lead single, "American Kids," offers a snapshot of how life is lived in 2014. These scattered allusions help Chesney seem like a modern man, even as he faces the start of his third decade as a country star, while the sly slickness The Big Revival also feels contemporary: far from chasing the bro-country wagon, Chesney overhauls his core strengths, winding up with his best record in years. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released April 2, 2002 | BNA Records Label

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Country - Released September 11, 2007 | BNA Records Label

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There's no denying that the title Just Who I Am: Poets & Pirates, Kenny Chesney's tenth studio album, bears an undercurrent of autobiography, as if he's telling us exactly what he's all about. Given this, it would seem logical that this album would be built upon original songs -- especially since its title echoes Be as You Are (Songs from an Old Blue Chair), his intimate 2005 album of originals -- but Just Who I Am has not one original song, when even its 2005 predecessor, The Road and the Radio, had a pair, including the very good "Beer in Mexico." Just Who I Am might not come from Chesney's pen, but these songs nevertheless have the appearance of being autobiographical, as they dwell upon teenage nostalgia, bittersweet memories, and the importance of family because life speeds by faster than you'd think. All of this gives the impression that Chesney is living a comfortable, familiar middle-aged existence, surrounded by his wife and kids, appreciating what he's got but looking back on his life with a fond eye. This isn't quite true -- Chesney is leaving his thirties without a wife and kids, which makes the number of songs celebrating close family feel a little odd (even if the song "Wife and Kids" finds Kenny pining for this close-knit family), since these are not songs about who Chesney is; they're about who is audience is. This carries over to his breezy, steel-drum island songs -- particularly the George Strait duet "Shiftwork," a mellow workingman's anthem where George and Kenny playfully soften the F in the title, making for a genuinely funny highlight -- right down to the arena-filling ballads, such as "Dancin' for the Groceries," an instant camp classic where Kenny looks sympathetically at a single mom stripping to support her kids (a kindness undercut by hammy, clumsy lyrics, epitomized by "in sequins and laces/she's dancing for braces"). These mawkish sentiments are heavy-handed, as are the arrangements in the power ballads, which are just slightly too clean and commercial, produced with an eye on the middle of the road. This measured, polished production does mean that the ballads, of which there are just a bit too many, do blend together unless they tend to go a little over the top, whether it's the seize-the-day sentiment of "Don't Blink" or that stripper-mom salute. Fortunately, then, Chesney does spend some time creating party songs for the islands, songs that may be just as calculated as the power ballads but at least are livelier, which make them more immediate and more lasting than the ballads, whether it's the cheerful morning-after memories of "Got a Little Crazy," a ridiculous Joe Walsh-driven version of Dwight Yoakam's rocker "Wild Ride," or "Shiftwork." That's not a whole lot of good times for an 11-track album, but when paired with the couple of light, midtempo cuts that have a little more snap -- such as the opener, "Never Wanted Nothing More" -- it does mean that Just Who I Am just manages from sinking into adult contemporary murk, even if it's hard to shake the feeling that Chesney is spending too much time acting how his audience expects him to be instead of just being who he is. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 27, 2017 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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Kenny Chesney treats his first-ever live album as a celebration, collecting 29 highlights recorded at some point over the 2010s. By casting such a wide net, Chesney has plenty of room for covers and cameos in addition to the hits, but it's also telling that Live in No Shoes Nation concentrates on all the music he's made following the release of 2001's Greatest Hits. Starting with 2001's No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems, he's hit his sunny stride, specializing in mellow beach tunes, slightly sad ballads, drinking tunes, and arena anthems, all of which are featured on this double-disc set. If the crowd noise sometimes seems a bit heavy-handed, the roar underscores how Chesney entertains on a mass scale, and that's perhaps the one revelation of the record: based on this, calling his fan base a nation isn't much of an exaggeration. While Live in No Shoes Nation is quite slick in both its performance and production, part of its charm is that it's such a professional affair. Chesney may possess an unassuming voice and his songs, even the rocking ones, are laid-back, but he knows how to pump up a crowd. Maybe that's a reflection of their affection, maybe it's a testament to his craft, but what's evident from Live in No Shoes Nation is that Chesney has this connection with his fans, and it's also clear that he's developed a deep catalog in the 21st century. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released April 28, 2017 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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Country - Released November 6, 2005 | BNA Records Label

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The Road and the Radio arrives at the end of a busy 2005 for Kenny Chesney. As the year opened, he followed up his 2004 blockbuster When the Sun Goes Down with the mellow Be as You Are. A few months later, he married movie star Renee Zellweger, and four months after that, she filed for divorce. Two months after that, Chesney returned with The Road and the Radio, the big, splashy proper follow-up to When the Sun Goes Down. Given such a tight, hectic schedule, it shouldn't come as a great surprise that The Road and the Radio sounds rushed, as if Chesney didn't have the chance to properly decide the right course for this album. He certainly didn't have the chance to write much -- only two of the songs here bear his credit, compared to the all-original Be as You Are and When the Sun Goes Down, which had four original compositions. Since Chesney has always demonstrated a good ear for material, this isn't a great detriment; he picks good tunes here, highlighted by the wry, lazily rocking "Living in Fast Forward." But the haphazard nature of The Road and the Radio means not only does the record fail to gel, but that its rough edges are particularly noticeable. "Rough" isn't quite the right word, though, since one thing this album is not is rough: it's a smooth, polished, commercial effort, heavy on anthemic choruses and bright surfaces. In other words, this is the poppiest that Kenny Chesney has ever sounded, from how the atmospheric keyboards on the opening title cut recall U2 to how "Summertime" is driven by a gurgling talk box guitar. This in itself wouldn't be a big problem -- it's been a long time since Chesney has pretended to be straight country, and he's very good at country-pop -- but the problem with The Road and the Radio is that the songs just aren't very memorable. The record is surely pleasant, but apart from the aforementioned cuts, plus the easy-listening Springsteen/Mellencamp tribute "In a Small Town" and the party-hearty "Beer in Mexico," the songs themselves don't rise above background music. And while that's enough to make it an enjoyable enough listen, it's also enough to break the hot streak he began with 2002's No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released April 6, 2018 | Blue Chair Records - Warner Bros.

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Country - Released February 2, 2004 | BNA Records Label

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Country - Released June 19, 2012 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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Country - Released February 26, 1999 | BNA Records Label

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Kenny Chesney's voice has always been a remarkable instrument, capable of a wide range of emotional expression, despite Chesney's subtle approach and laid-back delivery. On Everywhere We Go, however, this unique talent seems wasted on too many cookie-cutter ballads and country-rock numbers that don't even pretend to rock. Chesney is at his best on songs like "What I Need to Do," a Don Henley-like mid-tempo pop song. The song's quietly desperate, regular guy lyrics fit Chesney like a glove, and consequently make ridiculous country stud-muffin filler like "She Thinks My Tractor's Sexy" sound completely out of place. In its finest moments, this album recalls the work of Don Williams. Unfortunately, these moments are rare; unlike Williams, Chesney seems afraid to explore the darker areas of his psyche and is content to wallow in Hallmark card emotional territory. The musicianship on Everywhere We Go is superb (typical for Nashville studio cats), yet the players here -- like Chesney -- have little meat in which to sink their teeth and, thus, sound a bit sleepy. ~ Pemberton Roach
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Country - Released March 1, 2010 | BNA Records Label

Kenny Chesney had his first Greatest Hits at the dawn of the millennium, just as he was turning into the biggest country star in the U.S. He wound up dominating much of the decade with his easy, breezy Caribbean country, equal parts heartland rock and Jimmy Buffett beach music, and that domination is summarized on 2009's Greatest Hits II, a 15-track collection that contains only one new song in the opening "Out Last Night," an amiable day-after shuffle that doesn't rock like "Beer in Mexico" but is livelier than most cuts on the two albums that preceded this comp. Chesney's records from the last stretch of the decade were so suited for a lazy afternoon that they sometimes could border on listless, but this collection does a good job of disguising that sweet dullness, concentrating on the songs that made him a superstar: "Living in Fast Forward," "There Goes My Life," "No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems," and his duet with Uncle Kracker, "When the Sun Goes Down." Some of his full albums were rewarding in their own right, but none of them quite captures all of his easy charms like this fine hits collection. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 28, 2010 | BNA Records Label

Good times have sunk into the marrow of Kenny Chesney’s bones, slowing down his metabolism, making him unlikely to kick up his tempos or turn up his amplifiers. Age slows you down but so do too many afternoons on the beach Chesney continues to romanticize, although not quite so much on 2010’s Hemingway’s Whiskey as he did on his last decade of records. Unlike its immediate predecessor, 2008’s Lucky Old Sun, Hemingway’s Whiskey isn’t simply lazy: it’s slow but it’s burnished and classy, not quite as literary as the Guy Clark title track might initially indicate, but surely handsome, its seamless weaving of guitars being the aural equivalent of high thread count sheets. By moving so slow, it seems assured the way only a work by a major star can, and if Chesney isn’t especially curious about expanding his horizons -- he doesn’t attempt anything new, he still dresses his Garth Brooks moves in guitars from U2, his history extends as far back as 1998, the year when George Jones originally recorded “Small Y’all” and he’s respectful enough to bring the Possum in for a duet -- he’s at least never sounds disinterested in his work. If anything, he’s a little too obsessive about his studio craft, polishing his hand-picked songs -- Chesney long ago ceding the writing spotlight to others, penning only one tune here, relying on such writers as Scotty Emerick, Deana Carter, Matraca Berg and David Lee Murphy -- so they all bear his same relaxed signature, winding up with an album that’s cohesive because it’s monochromatic. Then again, monochromatic can also be read as reliable, giving the people what they want and with Chesney, that’s an easy, relaxed good time…it’s just, now that he’s in his 40s, he makes records designed for a quiet weekend afternoon at home instead of a Friday night kegger. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 27, 2017 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - Columbia Nashville

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Country - Released January 22, 2004 | BNA Records Label

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Country - Released April 24, 2012 | Blue Chair Records, LLC - BNA Records