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Jazz - Released March 7, 1958 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
For his final Prestige-related session as a sideman, John Coltrane (tenor sax) and Kenny Burrell (guitar) are supported by an all-star cast of Paul Chambers (bass), Jimmy Cobb (drums), and Tommy Flanagan (piano). This short but sweet gathering cut their teeth on two Flanagan compositions, another two lifted from the Great American Songbook, and a Kenny Burrell original. Flanagan's tunes open and close the album, with the spirited "Freight Trane" getting the platter underway. While not one of Coltrane's most assured performances, he chases the groove right into the hands of Burrell. The guitarist spins sonic gold and seems to inspire similar contributions from Chambers' bowed bass and Coltrane alike. Especially as the participants pass fours (read: four bars) between them at the song's conclusion. The Gus Kahn/Ted Fio Rito standard "I Never Knew" frolics beneath Burrell's nimble fretwork. Once he passes the reins to Coltrane, the differences in their styles are more readily apparent, with Burrell organically emerging while Coltrane sounds comparatively farther out structurally. Much of the same can likewise be associated to Burrell's own "Lyresto," with the two co-leads gracefully trading and incorporating spontaneous ideas. While not as pronounced, the disparity in the way the performance is approached is a study in unifying and complementary contrasts. The delicate "Why Was I Born" is one for the ages as Burrell and Coltrane are captured in a once-in-a-lifetime duet. Together they weave an uncanny and revealing sonic tapestry that captures a pure and focused intimacy. This, thanks in part to the complete restraint of the ensemble, who take the proverbial "pause for the cause" and sit out. What remains is the best argument for the meeting of these two jazz giants. The performance can likewise be located on the various-artists Original Jazz Classics: The Prestige Sampler (1988) and Playboy Jazz After Dark (2002) and is worth checking out, regardless of where one might find it. In many ways the showpiece of the project is Flanagan's nearly quarter-hour "Big Paul." The pianist's lengthy intro establishes a laid-back bop-centric melody with his trademark stylish keyboards perfectly balancing Chambers and Cobb's rock-solid timekeeping. Coltrane's restraint is palpable as he traverses and examines his options with insightful double-time flurries that assert themselves then retreat into the larger extent of his solo. Those interested in charting the saxophonist's progression should make specific note of his work here. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 1, 1965 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though the jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell is associated mostly with Blue Note-based hard bop and soul-jazz (he had a hit with the funky "Chile con Carne"), he is also a musician of considerable artistry. Witness his landmark 1965 collaboration with Gil Evans, Guitar Forms, which rivals anything the arranger did with Miles Davis. Indeed, the track "Lotus Land" has a bolero form very reminiscent of Sketches of Spain. There is no stinting on the blues here, either, as evidenced on "Downstairs" and "Terrace Theme." But the highlights are the bossa nova version of Alec Wilder's "Moon and Sand," as well as a characteristically slow and luxurious treatment of Harold Arlen's "Last Night When We Were Young." Throughout, Burrell takes thoughtful, concise, and utterly musical solos, and even switches to acoustic classical guitar on "Prelude #2" and "Loie." © Richard Mortifoglio /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1963 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

This album is one of guitarist Kenny Burrell's best-known sessions for the Blue Note label. Burrell is matched with tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine, bassist Major Holley, drummer Bill English, and Ray Barretto on conga for a blues-oriented date highlighted by "Chitlins Con Carne," "Midnight Blue," "Saturday Night Blues," and the lone standard "Gee Baby Ain't I Good to You." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Bebop - Released October 23, 2015 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released May 29, 1956 | Blue Note

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Despite its title, this LP was actually guitarist Kenny Burrell's second Blue Note album, although the first to be released. Teamed with pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Kenny Clarke and the conga of Candido, Burrell displays what was already an immediately recognizable tone. At 24, Burrell had quickly emerged to become one of the top bop guitarists of the era, and he is in particularly excellent form on "This Time the Dreams on Me," "Weaver of Dreams" and "Delilah." A bonus of this set is a percussion duo by Clarke and Candido on "Rhythmorama." Enjoyable music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 7, 1958 | Prestige

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1963 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released October 31, 2018 | nagel heyer records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Verve

After its original release on Cadet Records in 1966, Have Yourself a Soulful Little Christmas was out of print for years until a 1992 reissue. With pensive, meditative, precise playing, it's a must-have and features a definitive jazz hit version of "Little Drummer Boy." © David A. Milberg & Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 13, 2011 | HighNote Records

Kenny Burrell has long been one of the top jazz guitarists, not only for his effortless ability to swing and terrific chops, but for his lyrical way of playing that never goes out of style. This live material comes from a pair of 2007 sets in California, featuring the jazz master unaccompanied. From the opening rendition of "Tenderly" he puts his audience on notice that they're in for a memorable evening. Burrell takes "Tenderly" from a soft introduction into a cooking bop workout. Other standards include an intimate, nostalgic "What a Wonderful World," a conversational, stop-and-go setting of "Come Rain or Come Shine," and a lovely, melancholy "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most." His medley tributes to songs made popular by Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington mix some atypical choices (how many players include relative obscurities like "No More" or "David Danced" in their salutes to these jazz greats?). Burrell's originals include a mellow tribute to another jazz guitar great ("Remembering Wes") and the upbeat, easygoing "Be Yourself" that features his vocal as well. Tenderly is beautifully recorded in front of appreciative audiences, who wisely hold their applause until the last moment to not miss a note by this talented guitarist. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

Groove great Kenny Burrell and Jimmy Smith (Hammond organ) together on the same album. Includes a rendition of "Fever." © Michael Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 5, 2010 | CTI

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Prestige

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This session is valuable for the majestic playing of tenor great Coleman Hawkins, who performs on half of the eight tracks. Released on the Prestige subsidiary Moodsville -- a label that specialized in recordings with an intimate, reflective atmosphere -- the Moodsville sound doesn't sit comfortably on Hawkins. His playing is brilliantly relaxed, but it's not mood music. Leader Kenny Burrell's playing is much more in line with the Moodsville groove. The guitarist is not amplified as much as he is on his Prestige dates from this time. In fact, he performs on a nylon-string instrument almost as much as he does on his hollow-body electric. Unlike Hawkins, Burrell's subdued contribution is made to measure for this date. Listeners expecting to hear Burrell the hard bopper won't. The key moments come during the interaction between the guitarist and tenor player, especially during their exchanges on Burrell's "Montono Blues." The rhythm section, Hawkins' working band from this period (pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Major Holley, and drummer Eddie Locke) provides impeccable, sublime support. © Jim Todd /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Fantasy Records

This session is valuable for the majestic playing of tenor great Coleman Hawkins, who performs on half of the eight tracks. Released on the Prestige subsidiary Moodsville -- a label that specialized in recordings with an intimate, reflective atmosphere -- the Moodsville sound doesn't sit comfortably on Hawkins. His playing is brilliantly relaxed, but it's not mood music. Leader Kenny Burrell's playing is much more in line with the Moodsville groove. The guitarist is not amplified as much as he is on his Prestige dates from this time. In fact, he performs on a nylon-string instrument almost as much as he does on his hollow-body electric. Unlike Hawkins, Burrell's subdued contribution is made to measure for this date. Listeners expecting to hear Burrell the hard bopper won't. The key moments come during the interaction between the guitarist and tenor player, especially during their exchanges on Burrell's "Montono Blues." The rhythm section, Hawkins' working band from this period (pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Major Holley, and drummer Eddie Locke) provides impeccable, sublime support. © Jim Todd /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1972 | Concord Records

This is a typically tasteful Kenny Burrell record (reissued on CD) with the guitarist mostly emphasizing ballads. Five of the seven songs (which include "Make Someone Happy," "Since I Fell for You" and the theme from "A Streetcar Named Desire") find Burrell assisted by pianist Richard Wyands (who also played electric piano), bassist Reggie Johnson and drummer Lenny McBrowne. "'Round Midnight" is played by Burrell with pianist Joe Sample, bassist Johnson and drummer Paul Humphrey while "Blues in the Night" is an unaccompanied guitar solo. Although the music overall is well-played, no real sparks fly and the results often border on being sleepy. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Blue Note Records

The music on this 1997 two-CD set was originally on two LPs and already previously reissued as a pair of CDs. Guitarist Kenny Burrell leads a very coherent jam session in the studio with a particularly strong cast that also includes trumpeter Louis Smith, both Junior Cook and Tina Brooks on tenors, either Duke Jordan or Bobby Timmons on piano, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Art Blakey. The material consists of basic originals and standards and has excellent playing all around; six of the nine tunes are over nine minutes long. At that point in time, Cook and Brooks had similar sounds, but, fortunately, the soloists are identified in the liner notes for each song. The solo star is often trumpeter Louis Smith, who fell into obscurity after a few notable appearances on Blue Note during the period (including his own brilliant date, Here Comes Louis Smith). He was one of the finest of the Clifford Brown-influenced players of the period and deserves much greater recognition. This is a recommended reissue for hard bop collectors who do not already have the two individual CDs. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

Despite its title, this LP was actually guitarist Kenny Burrell's second Blue Note album, although the first to be released. Teamed with pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Kenny Clarke and the conga of Candido, Burrell displays what was already an immediately recognizable tone. At 24, Burrell had quickly emerged to become one of the top bop guitarists of the era, and he is in particularly excellent form on "This Time the Dreams on Me," "Weaver of Dreams" and "Delilah." A bonus of this set is a percussion duo by Clarke and Candido on "Rhythmorama." Enjoyable music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Fantasy Records

Coaxing a great tone from an electric guitar is harder than it looks, and Kenny Burrell consistently plays with both warmth and bite. His combination of deep blues sensibilities and thorough finesse, tempered with a considerable taste for understatement, earned the guitarist a well-deserved reputation for delivering the goods in the late '50s and early '60s. Soul Call is yet another great Burrell record. On "Here's That Rainy Day," he epitomizes all that is cool in jazz guitar, framing his lush chord-melody statement using a minimum of voicings, and burning up the changes without ever overplaying, sacrificing clarity, or compromising his tone, all while infusing an achingly beautiful standard with a graceful blues tinge. He then repeats this achievement in a harder-swinging vein on "Lucky So and So" and on the ballad "A Sleepin' Bee. "Mark One" is an uptempo cooker by pianist Will Davis; Burrell himself contributes two blues, the late-night, conga-fueled slink of the title cut and the relentlessly jumping "Kenny's Theme." © Rovi Staff /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 11, 2016 | HighNote Records

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