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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though the jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell is associated mostly with Blue Note-based hard bop and soul-jazz (he had a hit with the funky "Chile con Carne"), he is also a musician of considerable artistry. Witness his landmark 1965 collaboration with Gil Evans, Guitar Forms, which rivals anything the arranger did with Miles Davis. Indeed, the track "Lotus Land" has a bolero form very reminiscent of Sketches of Spain. There is no stinting on the blues here, either, as evidenced on "Downstairs" and "Terrace Theme." But the highlights are the bossa nova version of Alec Wilder's "Moon and Sand," as well as a characteristically slow and luxurious treatment of Harold Arlen's "Last Night When We Were Young." Throughout, Burrell takes thoughtful, concise, and utterly musical solos, and even switches to acoustic classical guitar on "Prelude #2" and "Loie." ~ Richard Mortifoglio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released September 1, 1956 | Blue Note

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Bebop - Released October 23, 2015 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released February 12, 2016 | Prestige

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

Despite its title, this LP was actually guitarist Kenny Burrell's second Blue Note album, although the first to be released. Teamed with pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Kenny Clarke and the conga of Candido, Burrell displays what was already an immediately recognizable tone. At 24, Burrell had quickly emerged to become one of the top bop guitarists of the era, and he is in particularly excellent form on "This Time the Dreams on Me," "Weaver of Dreams" and "Delilah." A bonus of this set is a percussion duo by Clarke and Candido on "Rhythmorama." Enjoyable music. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

This album is one of guitarist Kenny Burrell's best-known sessions for the Blue Note label. Burrell is matched with tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine, bassist Major Holley, drummer Bill English, and Ray Barretto on conga for a blues-oriented date highlighted by "Chitlins Con Carne," "Midnight Blue," "Saturday Night Blues," and the lone standard "Gee Baby Ain't I Good to You." ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Fantasy Records

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Bebop - Released October 26, 2010 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Bebop - Released September 13, 2011 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | GRP

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Fantasy Records

One doesn't place a Kenny Burrell CD in the disc player and worry, "Will this be good?" One just waits to see what kind of treasures the new disc will hold. Stormy Monday Blues, taken from two mid-'70s recordings on Fantasy -- Stormy Monday and Sky Street -- features Burrell playing his bluesy guitar in small-group settings. On the first set, he's joined by pianist Richard Wyands, bassist John Heard, and drummer Lenny McBrowne on standards like the title cut and "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)." Heard offers an inconspicuous kickoff to "Stormy Monday Blues," outlining the melody with his bass. This quiet, unobtrusive beginning lays down the right groove for an extended, all so bluesy solo by Burrell. Wyands' tasteful support and lead on "Paris Blues" holds to this late-night mood. The only variation arrives unexpectedly on "Why Did I Choose You?," a lovely piece that Burrell plays solo. Saxophonist Jerome Richardson, electric pianist Kirk Lightsey, bassist Stanley Gilbert, and drummer Eddie Marshall are featured on the second set. Originals like Richardson's "Three Thousand Miles Back Home" sound very '70s-ish, meaning funky keyboards and basslines date the material. This is the type of jazz that crossed over onto albums by rock bands like Steely Dan in the mid-'70s. While the four cuts from the second set aren't bad, they really don't hold up to the earlier material. Stormy Monday Blues finds Burrell in the midst of change, swinging hard on one album and adapting to new sounds on the next. Either way, he plays beautifully and this album shouldn't be missed. ~ Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1968 | Verve

When it comes to Kenny Burrell, a title like Blues -- The Common Ground speaks volumes. His approach always keeps in mind the connection of jazz to the blues, infusing his guitar with a soulful, hard bop edge. Recorded in 1967 and 1968, Blues -- The Common Ground finds Burrell backed by lots of brass and wind instruments for most of the album, hardly his usual setting. But his guitar successfully weaves in and out of songs like "Every Day (I Have the Blues)" and "Burning Spear," blending with the band and creating a pleasant balance. Much of this works thanks to arranger Don Sebesky's tasteful settings. Sebesky seems to have an instinctive grasp of when to sit on the band and when to let it fly loose. There's the late-night, gentle feel of "Angel Eyes," and the more animated setup on the title cut. The only time this doesn't work is on pieces like "The Preacher" and "See See Rider," where the upbeat horns and shrill flutes remind one of a "groovy" soundtrack from a bad '60s movie. It's also interesting to note that the album's unusual song choices, like "Everydays" by Stephen Stills, do find common ground in the blues. There's a beautiful, short solo piece, "Were You There?," and two quartet pieces, "Sausalito Nights" and "Soulful Brothers." Blues -- The Common Ground holds up well, and the 2001 reissue offers Burrell fans a cleaned-up version of this fine album. ~ Ronnie D. Lankford Jr.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Verve Reissues

With his always cool tone, gently swinging bop style, and utter disdain for distortion, delay, or any other sonic tricks, guitarist Kenny Burrell has been a steady -- and steadfast -- figure in modern jazz for decades. He has worked with some of the greatest names ever to grace the genre, including the likes of John Coltrane, Stan Getz, Milt Jackson, Gil Evans, Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, Sonny Rollins, and Quincy Jones, to name just a few, and his session chart extends to over 200-some albums -- one could argue that he has been the most tasteful and consummate jazz guitar sideman of the past 50 years. He has also released a dozen or so album projects under his own name as a group leader, the best of which were recorded for Verve Records in the mid- to late '60s, the period covered by this brief, concise eight-track compilation. Smooth, gentle, and lightly orchestrated instrumental sides like the versions of standards “Last Night When We Were Young,” “Angel Eyes,” and “My Favorite Things” presented here showcase Burrell's calm, melodic strengths, making this set a perfect introduction to one of the best and most understated jazz guitarists of his generation. ~ Steve Leggett
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Concord Records

Ballad Essentials compiles 12 remastered tracks recorded by jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell between 1958 and 2002, encompassing his tenure with Prestige, Fantasy, Contemporary, and Concord Jazz. The romantic themes include four Duke Ellington compositions, the Miles Davis-penned "Blue in Green," and Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." The bop-based Detroit guitarist is backed up on these dates by various all-star ensembles that feature John Coltrane, Tommy Flanagan, Coleman Hawkins, Joe Sample, Jimmy Smith, and numerous others. This is another well-chosen set in the Concord Jazz Ballad Essentials series. ~ Al Campbell
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Blue Note Records