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Jazz - Released May 7, 2010 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Jazz - Released September 6, 1982 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Elu par Citizen Jazz - Hi-Res Audio - Top du mois de Jazznews
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Jazz - Released May 8, 2015 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Sélection JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released November 30, 1975 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
Recorded in 1975 at the Köln Opera House and released the same year, this disc has, along with its revelatory music, some attendant cultural baggage that is unfair in one sense: Every pot-smoking and dazed and confused college kid -- and a few of the more sophisticated ones in high school -- owned this as one of the truly classic jazz records, along with Bitches Brew, Kind of Blue, Take Five, A Love Supreme, and something by Grover Washington, Jr. Such is cultural miscegenation. It also gets unfairly blamed for creating George Winston, but that's another story. What Keith Jarrett had begun a year before on the Solo Concerts album and brought to such gorgeous flowering here was nothing short of a miracle. With all the tedium surrounding jazz-rock fusion, the complete absence on these shores of neo-trad anything, and the hopelessly angry gyrations of the avant-garde, Jarrett brought quiet and lyricism to revolutionary improvisation. Nothing on this program was considered before he sat down to play. All of the gestures, intricate droning harmonies, skittering and shimmering melodic lines, and whoops and sighs from the man are spontaneous. Although it was one continuous concert, the piece is divided into four sections, largely because it had to be divided for double LP. But from the moment Jarrett blushes his opening chords and begins meditating on harmonic invention, melodic figure construction, glissando combinations, and occasional ostinato phrasing, music changed. For some listeners it changed forever in that moment. For others it was a momentary flush of excitement, but it was change, something so sorely needed and begged for by the record-buying public. Jarrett's intimate meditation on the inner workings of not only his pianism, but also the instrument itself and the nature of sound and how it stacks up against silence, involved listeners in its search for beauty, truth, and meaning. The concert swings with liberation from cynicism or the need to prove anything to anyone ever again. With this album, Jarrett put himself in his own league, and you can feel the inspiration coming off him in waves. This may have been the album every stoner wanted in his collection "because the chicks dug it." Yet it speaks volumes about a musician and a music that opened up the world of jazz to so many who had been excluded, and offered the possibility -- if only briefly -- of a cultural, aesthetic optimism, no matter how brief that interval actually was. This is a true and lasting masterpiece of melodic, spontaneous composition and improvisation that set the standard. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released June 13, 2014 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released October 4, 1999 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
This is a strangely moving and disturbing document in the long discography of Keith Jarrett: a solo piano album recorded in his rural New Jersey home studio in 1998 at a time when he was reportedly suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. In stark contrast to his other solo albums, this one consists of short, simple, straightforward interpretations of ballads, songs in the public domain, and one very pretty original ("Meditation"), all taken at funereal tempi with hardly any virtuoso flourishes. Scattered amidst the assortment of standards like "Someone to Watch Over Me," "I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good," and "I Loves You Porgy" are nostalgic throwbacks like the hoary old "My Wild Irish Rose" (he plays the tune absolutely straight) and even the Mario Lanza hit "Be My Love." Sad as it is to say under the circumstances, these performances lack color, contrast and life; and while you pull for Jarrett to summon the energy to make music again, the results are touching for a while but soon pall. Also in contrast to Manfred Eicher's usual sonic standard at ECM, the sound is dull and lacking in luster, though some listeners might find that it gives the album a certain homey charm. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released November 30, 1975 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Elu par Citizen Jazz - Hi-Res Audio
Ranked #12 in JazzTimes' "Top 50 CDs of 2009."
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Jazz - Released May 24, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Sélection FIP - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released November 4, 2011 | ECM

Distinctions Pianiste Maestro - Choc de Classica
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Jazz - Released October 19, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Keith Jarrett’s solo discography is a bottomless pit that he’s been digging out since the end of the ‘60s, with about 25 albums and counting. It’s an ever-changing collection, much like the career of this pianist from Allentown. In 2002, after some serious health problems, Jarrett got back up on stage alone in Japan. Four years later, on 19th July 2006, he’s still alone, this time on the stage of the prestigious Teatro La Fenice, THE great Venetian Mecca for opera. Unlike his past concerts, which consisted of long improvisations of thirty or even forty minutes, he now focuses his performances around shorter pieces that are often linked to each other. Such is the case for this album recorded at La Fenice. Jarrett immediately throws himself body and soul into an ocean of notes, one of his 17-minute improvisations, amazing in its technique and to which only he holds the secret. The atonality collides with highly melodic sequences, jazz and classical music irrigating each of his ideas. Hold on tight or you’ll fall out your saddle! The level of musicality and the originality of his phrasing leaves you constantly fascinated by his unparalleled playing. It’s a language that speaks to everyone, both expert and beginner. And even when he goes off the beaten track to cover My Wild Irish Rose, Blossom and Stella By Starlight, his music is quite irresistible. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 4, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Jazz - Released May 1, 1976 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released October 19, 2018 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Keith Jarrett’s solo discography is a bottomless pit that he’s been digging out since the end of the ‘60s, with about 25 albums and counting. It’s an ever-changing collection, much like the career of this pianist from Allentown. In 2002, after some serious health problems, Jarrett got back up on stage alone in Japan. Four years later, on 19th July 2006, he’s still alone, this time on the stage of the prestigious Teatro La Fenice, THE great Venetian Mecca for opera. Unlike his past concerts, which consisted of long improvisations of thirty or even forty minutes, he now focuses his performances around shorter pieces that are often linked to each other. Such is the case for this album recorded at La Fenice. Jarrett immediately throws himself body and soul into an ocean of notes, one of his 17-minute improvisations, amazing in its technique and to which only he holds the secret. The atonality collides with highly melodic sequences, jazz and classical music irrigating each of his ideas. Hold on tight or you’ll fall out your saddle! The level of musicality and the originality of his phrasing leaves you constantly fascinated by his unparalleled playing. It’s a language that speaks to everyone, both expert and beginner. And even when he goes off the beaten track to cover My Wild Irish Rose, Blossom and Stella By Starlight, his music is quite irresistible. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1977 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1976 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Restlessly searching out new territory for improvisations, Keith Jarrett tackles the massive Karl Joseph Riepp "Trinity" Baroque pipe organ at the Benedictine Abbey in Ottobeuren, Germany. He starts out with a pastoral "Hymn of Remembrance," then embarks upon a long nine-movement series of "Spheres" before closing with a grand "Hymn of Release." The devotee of Jarrett's piano will quickly discover that his organ idiom has nothing to do with his piano performances; he likes slow-moving, pulseless, sometimes dissonant, sometimes reverent or ecstatic smears of sound (which makes practical sense in the hugely reverberant churches where pipe organs are found). In the ninth movement, Jarrett can fool you into thinking that he is playing floating electronic space music (on an 18th-century organ!). Yet if one must apply a category, despite the improvisatory element, this double-LP is contemporary classical organ music, much closer to that of Olivier Messiaen than anything in the jazz world -- and only intermittently as striking. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released May 1, 1977 | ECM

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
The fourth of Keith Jarrett's solo piano albums turns inward, away from the funky, pulsating melodic inventions of its predecessors toward a more reflective, scattered, never-despairing romanticism well removed from the pulse of jazz. As such, it is paradoxically his weakest solo piano album of the '70s and also the most influential, for here is the blueprint for sensitive meandering that the New Age piano crowd took off upon in the 1980s. A studio session, Staircase is actually only one of four separately titled improvisations on this double album (now on one CD) -- the others are "Hourglass," "Sundial" and "Sand" -- but their overall moods of repose are so similar that it hardly matters what they are called. One can always admire Jarrett's lovely tone and flexible touch, yet when he gets stuck for ideas, the repetitions finally begin to grate. Maybe he really needs the stimulus of a live audience in order to get the creative and rhythmic juices flowing when flying solo. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released March 2, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
"Another live album from Jarrett's trio?" It's hard not to let out a little yelp as the Allentown pianist continues his apparently-infinite discographic march, aided by drummer Jack DeJohnette and bassist Gary Peacock. But after listening to the first-ever release of this concert from 14 November 1998 at Newark's New Jersey Performing Arts Center, you might start to see where producer Manfred Eicher was coming from when he decided to bring this one out. Keith Jarrett even said himself: “I was amazed to hear how well the music worked. For me, it's not only a historical document, but a truly great concert.” As ever, the three friends move quickly through a few classics from the Great American Songbook but also a few wonders by John Coltrane ( Moment’s Notice), Bud Powell (Bouncin' With Bud) and Sonny Rollins (Doxy). Above all, that evening signalled that Keith Jarrett was back in business after two years spent offstage for health reasons. From 1996 to 1998 the pianist was suffering from Chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, and hearing his return to form here is a real treat. Let's resist the temptation to start waxing lyrical about the fascinating complicity between Jarrett and his rhythm section, and just say that After The Fall is a record that speaks with one voice. It's an original voice, as is the re-reading of Bud Powell that opens the concert - and swing proudly reigns at its heart. This world first is also a ray of sunshine and a burst of infectious joy. As ever, DeJohnette and Peacock merrily create jaw dropping havoc on Bouncin' With Bud... In short, it would have been a crime to leave these tapes in the archive. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 22, 2002 | ECM

Booklet
In the XL discography of the Jarrett/Peacock/DeJohnette trio, Always Let Me Go is among the albums comprised of original compositions. After Changes (1983), Changeless (1987) and Inside Out (2000), here is the fourth disc that the three Americans penned in complete freedom. Twenty years after the start of their partnership, their harmony is such that the improvisations they offer here lean on a complete complicity and mutual listening. Recorded live in April 2001 in Tokyo, Always Let Me Go offers rhythms from DeJohnette and Peacock that are more agile and feline than ever before. It’s a tandem that had become one with the melodic (or not) motifs that develops Jarrett. Motifs and non-stop bifurcations—we go from the most swinging jazz to the freest improvised music in the blink of an eye—like on the 32 minutes of Hearts In Space, the completely captivating (but demanding) theme that opens the disc. More than 135 minutes of intense music, often intellectual, and always looking forward. © CM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 1, 1995 | ECM

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Keith Jarrett in the magazine