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Country - Released June 28, 2005 | Asylum - Warner Records

In "Southern Kind of Life," a song on her debut album, The Captain, Kasey Chambers convincingly describes a rural Southern upbringing -- poverty stricken and Bible dominated -- and since she performs in a style associated with the Appalachians as developed into commercial country music, it's easy to assume she's singing about the American South. But she isn't; she's singing about the Nullarbor Plain in south-central Australia, where she grew up, apparently listening to a lot of country records. The result is a style that will remind some listeners of Dolly Parton and others of Lucinda Williams, as Chambers, backed by her father and produced by her brother, both of them members of the family's Dead Ringer Band, sings in a breathy voice that breaks expressively. Her tunes tend to be either "I am" songs of self-description like "Southern Kind of Life" and "Cry Like a Baby," accounts of romantic difficulties, or celebrations of life on the road. Though she has a gift for wordplay that favors internal rhyme, her imagery can be trite ("You got the car and I got the break"), and her compositions are less interesting in themselves than in the performances she gives them. Like many young artists, she is still a compendium of her influences rather than a distinct figure unto herself, but The Captain is a sincere effort steeped in the kind of country/folk/rock style that made Lucinda Williams a critical success in the late '90s, and it is likely to attract similar attention. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Sugar Hill Records

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Country - Released December 16, 2008 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 7, 2004 | Warner Records

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Country - Released January 1, 2008 | Sugar Hill Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2014 | Concord Sugar Hill

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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Sugar Hill Records

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Country - Released January 1, 2011 | Sugar Hill Records

Kasey Chambers has a dozen years on Taylor Swift -- hell, she could have been an influence -- but since the Pennsylvania girl took over the world, Chambers landed on the "you may also like" list. Not that that's a bad thing, though, as the ladies share the same brand of streamlined country-pop that sounds universal enough to appeal to romantic music aficionados anywhere in the world, but without losing that American vibe that Chambers creates no less skillfully for being an Australian. Little Bird is more old school, as it peppers the pop hits with honest to God country numbers, complete with banjo and fiddle -- see "Georgia Brown" or the closer. But while those are nice, there's no arguing that the multi-platinum sales Chambers enjoys on her home turf are due to a different facet of her sound -- those simple guitar-driven tunes that owe as much to folk and Bryan Adams as to Dolly Parton and the Man in Black. The melodies are simple and so are the lyrics, but as long as the emotion is genuine, the simplicity is a benefit, and Little Bird has enough of those, be it dynamic rockers backed by electric guitars ("Down Here on Earth") or delicate strummed balladry ("Somewhere"). Now, Swift does it better -- possibly because she is younger and more naive, but actually because she's just more adept at tapping that sappiness vibe that people in love anywhere in the world can relate to. With Chambers, the music and the words sometimes tether on the brink of cliché, not archetype. But for the most part, she is still able to deliver her tunes with honesty that makes you think about feelings she's conveying, not her recording budgets, as is the case with many over-processed country stars out there. © Alexey Eremenko /TiVo
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Country - Released September 12, 2006 | Warner Records

After firmly establishing herself as the most gifted artist on Australia's country music scene with her first three solo albums, Kasey Chambers has given herself some new worlds to conquer on 2006's Carnival. While Carnival is roots-friendly enough that it isn't likely to seriously alienate most of her fans, this album does represent a clear and decisive break from the country-influenced approach of her earlier music; most of these 12 songs are easygoing but satisfying roots rock with a bluesy undertone, though the vengeful "I Got You Now" is real-deal rock & roll with plenty of tough rave-up guitar from Mark Punch, there's a jazzy sway to "Light Up a Candle," and "You Make Me Sing" is a sexy bit of late-night funk. Carnival places Chambers' music in new surroundings, but for the most part she herself (thankfully) seems little changed. As a vocalist, Chambers remains wonderfully expressive while maintaining a realistic emotional palate at all times, and her instrument is simple but gorgeous. As a songwriter, she keeps getting better at writing about the stuff of everyday lives (love, lust, disappointment, getting on with life) with an uncommon degree of horse sense and attention to detail, and if anything, the new musical backdrops have added to the depth of her emotional landscapes. And with her brother Nash Chambers once again on hand as producer, the music is as soulful and smart as her singing, which is no small accomplishment. With Carnival, Kasey Chambers gives up her title as the greatest Aussie country singer alive and becomes -- the greatest Aussie singer around today? Maybe that's going a bit far to make a point, but after hearing this album, most people would be much less likely to argue the point. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 25, 2006 | Warner Records