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Electronic/Dance - Released September 16, 2016 | RVNG Intl.

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Ghostly International

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 6, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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California-based composer Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith had a banner year in 2016. Both her vibrant, playful solo album Ears and her dream collaboration with new age legend Suzanne Ciani, released as part of RVNG Intl.'s FRKWYS series, received a great deal of acclaim, establishing her as a notable creator of lush, imaginative electronic music. The 2017 full-length The Kid builds on Ears' seamless fusion of synthetic and organic sounds, combining the fluid tones of her preferred instrument, the Buchla Music Easel, with other synthesizers, such as the rare EMS Synthi 100, in addition to orchestral arrangements performed by the Berlin-based contemporary ensemble Stargaze. Right from the album's beginning (the swirling, rainforest-like "I Am a Thought"), The Kid is sonically richer and busier than Smith's previous work. When her vocals appear on "An Intention," they're less masked by effects than before, and her sentiments are much clearer: "I feel everything at the same time." Before the album's arrival, Smith released a cover of Sade's "By Your Side," and her singing is more assured and clearly more inspired by R&B and pop this time around. Following track "A Kid" is more upbeat, and also weirder, with melting Far East-inspired melodies, popping bubble-like textures, and lightly thumping techno beats. When her vocals come in, "A Kid" seems to resemble a highlight from some sort of futuristic deep-space musical, with rumbling bass and astral whooshing noises contributing to the hallucinatory sound wash. "In the World, But Not of the World" is another winning excursion into space age pop, with wondrous vocals surrounded by jittery beats and a virtual robot symphony. "To Follow and Lead" is the album's future-pop centerpiece, punctuating a bubbly, friendly beat with a complex yet catchy horn-driven wordless chorus. The album's final quarter showcases Stargaze's orchestral arrangements more heavily than the album's preceding songs, and their prismatic patterns blend intriguingly with Smith's splashy electronics. While she cuts up her vocals on "I Will Make Room for You" and seems to sing non-lyrical syllables throughout, there are also more direct expressions, such as when she sings "I will wake up one day and you won't be there" on the calm, wistful "To Feel Your Best." The entire album is a stunning work of highly advanced kaleidoscopic new age pop, and is easily Smith's best and most accessible release to date. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Ambient - Released January 11, 2019 | Touchtheplants

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Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith recorded Tides: Music for Meditation and Yoga in 2013, so her mother could have something to play during her yoga classes. Functionally, the release is true to its title -- this is the most purely new age album Smith has released. While her later, more pop-influenced recordings, such as 2017's marvelous The Kid, include warped vocals, sophisticated ensemble arrangements, and busy, colorful melodies, Tides consists entirely of gently flowing tones played on a Buchla Music Easel synthesizer, along with additional sounds such as chirping birds and wind chimes. By design, there are several points where it's hard to tell which sounds are being produced synthetically and which are field recordings -- electronic melodies buzz like crickets, and synth tones drift like a breeze through the woods. Additionally, there are moments where one might assume that Smith is playing a tambura or a harmonium rather than a synthesizer. The songs often have curious, playful melodies which rock back and forth, lulling the listeners into a state of deep concentration but keeping their minds alert and engaged. Other pieces, such as "Tides V," are immersive, cloudy drones which seem to form a cocoon of sound. "Tides VIII" is basically a short musical snow globe, created to stir up all sorts of fuzzy feelings. The final half of concluding piece "Tidex IX" consists entirely of wind chimes and a forest full of birds and insects, taking everything back to nature. While not as ornate as her subsequent works, Tides spotlights Smith's talent for building moods. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released April 1, 2016 | Western Vinyl

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith composes her swirling, colorful electronic songs on Buchla synthesizers, particularly the portable, user-friendly Music Easel. Her warm, vibrant music inevitably recalls the work of Buchla masters such as Suzanne Ciani and Laurie Spiegel, but it's playful and exuberant enough to land her opening gigs for Dan Deacon and Animal Collective. It's bubbly and tranquil enough to elicit comparisons to 21st century underground synthesizer artists such as Panabrite or Dolphins into the Future, but Smith's music is still a bit too hyperactive to really label ambient or new age, even though it generally doesn't include drums. She allows the oscillating electronic tones to ebb and flow like waves, and they have fluid, natural rhythms rather than quantized beat structures. Ears features a greater presence of Smith's warped vocals than on 2015's Euclid, and more often than not, they seem to speak a subconscious alien language rather than recognizable English words. The album also benefits from the added presence of woodwind arrangements, which give the music somewhat of a floral texture. While Euclid sounded bright and freewheeling enough to soundtrack a fun, cartoonish video game, Ears has a slightly darker and more mysterious tone, but not enough to make it seem menacing or off-putting. Opener "First Flight" includes rapid arpeggios that seem to flow like water rushing through a stream, constantly splashing up onto the shore. "Rare Things Grow" sounds like it could've been recorded in a rain forest, with wet, flowing sounds, thumb pianos, and fluttering woodwinds pleasantly swaying over a detached rhythm that strangely resembles Autechre's "Basscadet." Most of the album's selections clock in between three and five minutes, but finale "Existence in the Unfurling" stretches out to 11, beginning with Smith's calm, wondrous vocals and ending with an extended passage where synthesizers and woodwinds excitedly duet with each other. Focused without sounding rigid or confined, Ears is imaginative and alive. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 20, 2015 | Western Vinyl

Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2020 | Ghostly International

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2020 | Ghostly International

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 10, 2020 | Ghostly International

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 8, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 8, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 14, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 12, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 27, 2016 | Western Vinyl

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Ambient - Released June 1, 2018 | Cascine

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 16, 2017 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 26, 2016 | Western Vinyl

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 22, 2016 | Western Vinyl