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Country - Released August 12, 2016 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Booklet
Justin Moore toughened up his attack on 2013's Off the Beaten Path, his third album and one that found him developing a distinctive modern rocking country that avoided the smiling swagger of bro country. Moore specialized in fusing second-hand honky tonk tradition, Heartland rock, and brawny country-rock in the vein of Hank Williams Jr., plus he had an easy way with a ballad as the hit "Lettin' the Night Roll" showed. Arriving in the summer of 2016, Kinda Don't Care accentuates all these elements, but slyly threads in pieces of the R&B-inflected country that dominated the airwaves in the three years between albums. Moore wisely doesn't attempt quick-stepping hip-hop inflections à la Sam Hunt -- he's too deliberate a singer for that -- but "Somebody Else Will" is a slow, soulful burner and "Got It Good" skips along to a buoyant beat. About a third of the record in its lengthy deluxe incarnation is dressed in this contemporary sheen, and the remarkable thing about Kinda Don't Care is how this doesn't sound like pandering: it feels like an outgrowth of his ballad side. Also, it complements the rowdy and rootsy elements of the record, making them hit a little harder. At times, Moore's rebellion can feel a little canned -- the growl of "More Middle Fingers" is a bit silly -- but usually, he gets by on his casual authority and sturdily constructed songs. No matter the sound, this is the constant on Kinda Don't Care: Moore is quietly confident, probably because he knows he has the goods. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$14.99

Country - Released August 12, 2016 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Booklet
Justin Moore toughened up his attack on 2013's Off the Beaten Path, his third album and one that found him developing a distinctive modern rocking country that avoided the smiling swagger of bro country. Moore specialized in fusing second-hand honky tonk tradition, Heartland rock, and brawny country-rock in the vein of Hank Williams Jr., plus he had an easy way with a ballad as the hit "Lettin' the Night Roll" showed. Arriving in the summer of 2016, Kinda Don't Care accentuates all these elements, but slyly threads in pieces of the R&B-inflected country that dominated the airwaves in the three years between albums. Moore wisely doesn't attempt quick-stepping hip-hop inflections à la Sam Hunt -- he's too deliberate a singer for that -- but "Somebody Else Will" is a slow, soulful burner and "Got It Good" skips along to a buoyant beat. About a third of the record in its lengthy deluxe incarnation is dressed in this contemporary sheen, and the remarkable thing about Kinda Don't Care is how this doesn't sound like pandering: it feels like an outgrowth of his ballad side. Also, it complements the rowdy and rootsy elements of the record, making them hit a little harder. At times, Moore's rebellion can feel a little canned -- the growl of "More Middle Fingers" is a bit silly -- but usually, he gets by on his casual authority and sturdily constructed songs. No matter the sound, this is the constant on Kinda Don't Care: Moore is quietly confident, probably because he knows he has the goods. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$17.99

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2011 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

$7.49

Country - Released January 1, 2009 | Valory

Though this obscure 1970 LP falls into the general folk-psych rock category, its focus is so all-over-the-place that it's hard to get a read on it. The group is Anglo-American, and at times the record seems very influenced by the poppiest side of American folk-rock, particularly in the blends of male and female vocal harmonies, which are extremely reminiscent of the Mamas & the Papas' approach in places. Yet there are also songs that have a more specifically British, gentle, reserved, acoustic quality; a character portrait of "Mr. Jones" with a whimsical British feel; and occasional off-the-wall burning fuzzy psychedelic guitar. At its most mature, it's slightly similar to, if an obscure reference point is allowed, the folk-prog-rock recordings that Giles, Giles & Fripp made as they were morphing into King Crimson (though not nearly as inspired). At its sappiest and most cooing, it could almost pass for a Californian sunshine pop recording. What the songs lack, however, are memorable choruses, or much cohesion between the parts, although the individual parts (especially the female vocalists' contributions) are often pretty. File under the section with the many stylistically confused rock bands of the period who had some talent and tried hard to say something important, but didn't quite have the goods. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Country - Released October 12, 2018 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

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Country - To be released July 26, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

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Country - Released March 8, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

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Country - Released June 14, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

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Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Big Machine Records

$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

$1.49

Country - Released January 1, 2010 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

$1.49

Country - Released January 1, 2011 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

$1.49

Country - Released June 28, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

Country - Released August 11, 2016 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

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Justin Moore toughened up his attack on 2013's Off the Beaten Path, his third album and one that found him developing a distinctive modern rocking country that avoided the smiling swagger of bro country. Moore specialized in fusing second-hand honky tonk tradition, Heartland rock, and brawny country-rock in the vein of Hank Williams Jr., plus he had an easy way with a ballad as the hit "Lettin' the Night Roll" showed. Arriving in the summer of 2016, Kinda Don't Care accentuates all these elements, but slyly threads in pieces of the R&B-inflected country that dominated the airwaves in the three years between albums. Moore wisely doesn't attempt quick-stepping hip-hop inflections à la Sam Hunt -- he's too deliberate a singer for that -- but "Somebody Else Will" is a slow, soulful burner and "Got It Good" skips along to a buoyant beat. About a third of the record in its lengthy deluxe incarnation is dressed in this contemporary sheen, and the remarkable thing about Kinda Don't Care is how this doesn't sound like pandering: it feels like an outgrowth of his ballad side. Also, it complements the rowdy and rootsy elements of the record, making them hit a little harder. At times, Moore's rebellion can feel a little canned -- the growl of "More Middle Fingers" is a bit silly -- but usually, he gets by on his casual authority and sturdily constructed songs. No matter the sound, this is the constant on Kinda Don't Care: Moore is quietly confident, probably because he knows he has the goods. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine