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Jazz - Released March 22, 2013 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 26, 2016 | ECM

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Folk/Americana - Released June 20, 2005 | Shanachie

There are those who consider this the best of Tabor's later recordings. And it is excellent, but for those new to her, this is even more stark and harrowing than usual. Still, it's a triumph of form and content, and her voice, now maturing into a richer, deeper, lower register, has become (if possible) a more formidable instrument than before. ~ John Dougan
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1990 | Cooking Vinyl

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Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 1994 | Cooking Vinyl

This addition to June Tabor's catalog reveals a woman exploring new aspects of her considerable talent while still feeding the roots of the folk tradition in which she grew up. A piano and concertina accompaniment provides a stark, dry background to Tabor's voice on "Shameless Love," the album's opening track, and on this song you hear her moving a little bit away from the traditionalism which has dominated so much of her work in the past. "I Want to Vanish," a song penned for Tabor by Elvis Costello, moves her even farther afield -- it almost sounds like a turn of the century parlor song. But the next three tracks find her on more familiar terrain: the traditional "False, False" and Richard Thompson's typically cynical and lovely "Pavanne" both sound like they were written for Tabor's rich alto voice, and "He Fades Away" is an emotionally devastating meditation in the voice of an Australian woman watching her husband die from the effects of asbestos mining -- "He fades away," she says, "not like the leaves of autumn turning gold against the grey," but rather "like the bloodstains on his pillowcase that I wash every day." If you can remain unmoved through this song, then you need to have your pulse checked. "Beauty and the Beast: An Anniversary" is an awkward spoken word interlude, but "Waiting for the Lark," the tender lullaby that closes the album, is a gorgeous counterweight to "He Fades Away." This is one of Tabor's finest efforts. ~ Rick Anderson
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Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2001 | Cooking Vinyl

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Folk/Americana - Released June 20, 2005 | Shanachie

June Tabor's first solo record is an understated triumph full of good songs, great arrangements, and a crack group of backing musicians led by the guitar playing of Nic Jones. Much of Airs and Graces is pure British folk, and Tabor has much fun with such ancient numbers as "While the Gamekeepers Lie Sleeping" and "Young Waters." The standout track, however, is her version of Eric Bogle's brilliant anti-war ode "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda." Sung a cappella, you can almost feel the bitterness in her voice, a breathtaking, stunning moment indicative of how amazing she can be. Reissued on compact disc by Shanachie. ~ John Dougan
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Folk/Americana - Released June 20, 2005 | Shanachie

June Tabor is one of the finest folk singers alive. Not only is she completely in command of a vast repertoire of traditional British and Irish songs, but she has also shown herself able to move completely out of that repertoire (into, for example, Yiddish and Civil War songs) without any loss of authority. Not everything she does succeeds entirely, but there are singers who would kill to be able to do at their best what she does when she's just phoning it in. That said, Abyssinians is not her best album. Although it starts off strong with the almost a cappella "Month of January," things quickly bog down: where "The Month of January" is gorgeous and depressing, "The Scarecrow" is merely depressing. And is that glass harmonica in the background? Good grief. (The lack of musician credits on the CD is an irritant.) "A Smiling Shore" is the heartbreakingly effective tale of a Holocaust survivor; "Lay This Body Down" is a Civil War-era spiritual which she delivers in a surprisingly effective voice. Most of the rest is mediocre for her, but again, that's not even close to half bad. ~ Rick Anderson