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Classical - Released March 24, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
The Gabrieli Consort continue their series of award-winning collaborations with the National Forum of Music, Wrocław, Poland with a new recording of Haydn’s great oratorio The Seasons. Using a new performing edition by Paul McCreesh this recording is the first to feature the large orchestral forces that Haydn originally called for, including a string section of 60, 8 horns and a choir of 70. The disc features solo performances from British singers Carolyn Sampson, Jeremy Ovenden and Andrew Foster-Williams.
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 1996 | Claves Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Claves Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released November 1, 2016 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released October 29, 2012 | Passacaille

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Classical - Released January 20, 2017 | Coro

Hi-Res Booklet
This is the third in a series of Haydn releases by conductor Harry Christophers, in his post as leader of Boston's venerable Handel and Haydn Society in its new incarnation as a historical-instrument band. Each recording has included one of the "morning-noon-evening" symphonies (Nos. 6-8) and one of the "Paris" symphonies of 1784, with one of Haydn's rarely played violin concertos in the center of the program. There are strong points here: in the Violin Concerto in A major, Hob. 7a/3, soloist Aisslinn Nosky brings a lively tone that helps make the best case for this rather shapeless work (the concerto form, foreclosing Haydn's endlessly inventive monothematic development, was never his strong point). And the playing of the orchestra in the Symphony No. 84 in E flat major, Hob. 1/84 is clean. But sample the minuet to see how you like Christophers' rather mannered style. The Handel and Haydn Society Orchestra is rather large for a period-instrument group, and in the Symphony No. 8 in G major, Hob. 1/8 ("Le soir") it tends to overwhelm Haydn's delicate coloristic effects. Further, it's not clear why the same program needed to be done, in effect, three times; there are many other ways to put sets of Haydn symphonies together. For Christophers fans this will probably be a desirable purchase; others have a range of choices for Haydn, the recordings of the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra being among the best on the historical-performance side. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 2, 2013 | Coro

Hi-Res Booklet
The partnership between British early music conductor Harry Christophers and the venerable American Handel and Haydn Society ensemble has worked out well for all concerned. The Society has been well entrenched in Boston's cultural life since Beethoven's day (they commissioned an oratorio from him at one point), but it has had only a fitful relationship with the recording industry. With Christophers, H&H gets the benefit of the house label of his wildly successful choral ensemble, the Sixteen. Christophers, for his part, gets to stretch forward into the Classical era like many of his early music contemporaries, with a precise and tonally pleasant ensemble at his command. The result here is a trio of Haydn works, never less than competently executed. The highlight is the Violin Concerto in G major, Hob. 7a/4, where the vivacious playing of soloist Aisslinn Nosky contrasts nicely with Christophers' reserved style. That reserved style also serves the Symphony No. 6 in D major, Hob. 1/6, quite well; this early work, with its muted colors depicting morning, somehow comes off differently with each new conductor who essays it. The Symphony No. 82 in C major, Hob. 1/82 ("L'ours," or The Bear), may be deadpan for some; if you like, say, Thomas Fey's cycle of Haydn symphonies (or for that matter older full-symphony readings), give a listen to some samples here. The sound environment of Boston's Symphony Hall is a major attraction in itself. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 6, 2016 | Challenge Classics

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Classical - Released May 7, 2021 | Musical Heritage Society

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Classical - Released June 7, 2007 | Alia Vox

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Classical - Released January 29, 2016 | Coro

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Classical - Released September 30, 2014 | Claves Records

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Classical - Released September 25, 2015 | Coro

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Classical - Released October 14, 2014 | Onyx Classics

Pianist Denis Kozhukhin, whose training includes both Russian and western European elements, has gained wide acclaim for recitals in which the 20th century element is often Prokofiev. This very nice group of Haydn sonatas has something of a Prokofiev-like quality: the four pieces, composed in the 1770s and 1780s, are given dry, sophisticated readings in which the humor in the music often sneaks in the back door of perception rather than being stated broadly. In an era in which the pianistic qualities of Haydn's sonatas are perhaps overstressed, it's nice to hear well-balanced readings like Kozhukhin's here, and they fill an empty niche. It's worth remembering that three of these four sonatas may well have originally been harpsichord works, and Kozhukhin's clean readings, without extreme dynamic ranges, do not go far beyond the boundaries of that sound world, adding only an extra layer of lyricism in the slow movements. A bonus is the crystalline sound achieved by Onyx's engineers in Berlin's Teldex studios, unusually well matched to Kozhukhin's artistic aims. The pianist's work here is both brilliant and daring, with the "Sturm und Drang" content of the Piano Sonata in B minor, Hob. 16/32, scaled back about as far as it can go, but still holding together convincingly. An impressive and somewhat unexpected outing: Russian pianists aren't much known for Haydn. The sole complaint is the presentation of the sonatas in the booklet as neglected teaching pieces; that was hardly true 20 years prior to the album's 2014 release, much less nowadays. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Channel Classics Records

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Classical - Released July 29, 2011 | DREANDAS

Classical - Released November 14, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Chamber Music - Released December 15, 2006 | Arsis

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Classical - Released April 24, 2013 | Regis Records