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Classical - Released March 30, 2001 | RCA Red Seal

Jorge Bolet was one of those artists whose performances in the studio often failed to catch the fire that sparked in live recitals. It is no wonder that among Bolet's greatest recordings is the RCA two-LP set of a Carnegie Hall recital of 1974. So the title of this CD, Bolet Rediscovered Liszt Recital holds out a promise that is not completely fulfilled. What was rediscovered is, in fact, a master tape of a 1972 studio recording of eight pieces by Franz Liszt. It is a very superior recorded program, to be sure, and ought to please the fans of composer and pianist alike. The program notes state that the reason for the failure to release the tape is still unknown, but speculates the idea was probably to make a two-LP set with future recordings, and that for some reason the master got stored without proper documentation until discovered at the turn of the century. In some cases it provides interpretations that essentially duplicate releases that have long been familiar -- for instance, the Funérailles or his unusually dreamy version of the Campanella etude. On the other hand, the Grand Galop chromatique is here fleet and playful (in contrast with his sober Decca recording) and his Liebestraum and Un sospiro are entirely successful. The most valuable recording is Bolet's only taping of the Rhapsodie espagnole, and impulsive recording with textual retouching by Bolet. Then there is an unbuttoned run-through of Liszt's Tannhäuser Overture arrangement that Bolet played after a 1973 session was over, perhaps unaware that the engineers managed to get the recorders running in the nick of time. Although there are several finger faults, there is a joy in Bolet playing essentially for himself that comes close to his public recital fire. The sound in all cases is fine. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | RCA Red Seal

To a great degree, this disc captures the excitement of Jorge Bolet's legendary recital at Carnegie Hall on February 25, 1974, and only falls short in conveying this pianist's enormous sound. The original analog recording is somewhat diminished in the digital transfer, and the inadequate technology of 1988 makes this CD a prime candidate for a new remastering. Yet Bolet's performances shine through the limited audio, and his mastery is what makes this album an essential item in any collection. His playing of the Bach/Busoni Chaconne in D minor is as controlled as possible, in light of its contrapuntal crossings and sudden changes of textures. Bolet gives a vigorous performance with only a few wrong notes -- easy to forgive when the daunting complexities of this arrangement are considered -- and the music is rich and powerful. In Chopin's Preludes, Bolet balances the shifting moods with great discipline, perhaps favoring the pensive preludes by minimizing the exuberance of the brighter pieces, but never at the expense of the set's continuity. Bolet's incredible ability to orchestrate at the keyboard is most apparent in Liszt's transcription of Wagner's Tannhäuser Overture, a tour de force of the piano's timbral possibilities. Decidedly the most dazzling offering of the evening, this extraordinary performance invites repeated listening. © TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | RCA Red Seal

From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | RCA Red Seal

From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released April 24, 2001 | RCA Red Seal

Jorge Bolet was one of those artists whose performances in the studio often failed to catch the fire that sparked in live recitals. It is no wonder that among Bolet's greatest recordings is the RCA two-LP set of a Carnegie Hall recital of 1974. So the title of this CD, Bolet Rediscovered Liszt Recital holds out a promise that is not completely fulfilled. What was rediscovered is, in fact, a master tape of a 1972 studio recording of eight pieces by Franz Liszt. It is a very superior recorded program, to be sure, and ought to please the fans of composer and pianist alike. The program notes state that the reason for the failure to release the tape is still unknown, but speculates the idea was probably to make a two-LP set with future recordings, and that for some reason the master got stored without proper documentation until discovered at the turn of the century. In some cases it provides interpretations that essentially duplicate releases that have long been familiar -- for instance, the Funérailles or his unusually dreamy version of the Campanella etude. On the other hand, the Grand Galop chromatique is here fleet and playful (in contrast with his sober Decca recording) and his Liebestraum and Un sospiro are entirely successful. The most valuable recording is Bolet's only taping of the Rhapsodie espagnole, and impulsive recording with textual retouching by Bolet. Then there is an unbuttoned run-through of Liszt's Tannhäuser Overture arrangement that Bolet played after a 1973 session was over, perhaps unaware that the engineers managed to get the recorders running in the nick of time. Although there are several finger faults, there is a joy in Bolet playing essentially for himself that comes close to his public recital fire. The sound in all cases is fine. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | RCA Red Seal