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R&B - Released May 1, 2020 | Warner Records

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R&B - Released March 13, 2020 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released December 20, 2018 | Clover Music

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R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Clover Music

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Kid talent show discovery JoJo's self-titled Blackground Records, Da Family-affiliated debut is a slick set of modern R&B in the vein of Brandy or Monica, with plenty of room to introduce its star's bigger-than-you'd-think presence. A bank of producers -- Vincent Herbert, Soulshock, Bink -- provide backgrounds that bump decidedly in the midrange -- there's a conscious effort to keep the focus on JoJo, and not whatever beats are currently making the grade. In other words, her vocals never sound detached from the goings-on behind her, or just a voice chattering over R&B generica. And this is promising, as the young singer really does have a tremendous voice. "Breezy" and "Homeboy" multi-track her trills, sulky whispers, and brassy wails over clicky percussion and a mixture of loops and instrumental snippets. Throughout there's talk of sheezies, throwbacks in the mix, cell phones, and the boy next door jilting poor JoJo. But even if the lyrics throughout are pretty interchangeable, vocally there's no doubt in her ability to carry the album, and the lack of irritating skits or attention-hogging guest shots is pretty refreshing. The funky jook of the Reggie and Ronald Burrell production "City Lights" features a few random "JoJo do that thing" drop-ins, but the girl gets right to the bottom of that freaky Beyoncé id, and aligns the cut with fellow standout "Not That Kinda Girl." Lead single "Leave (Get Out)" doesn't have a lot of staying power, but its guitar figure is a nice touch, and the chorus hits with the right amount of tell-off brashness. There's also a serviceable update of the 1992 SWV hit "Weak," the stripped-down strut of "Yes or No" (is that real beat boxing?), and the requisite ballad in "Never Say Goodbye." All in all, JoJo is a strong debut. Its centerpiece is never smothered with collabo pile-ons, and she's served well by the mix of arrangements and backgrounds. She's definitely courting middle-lane accessibility, but she rightly lets her singing do the talking, and that's a signal of where she's headed. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 1, 2020 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released October 11, 2019 | Clover Music

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 27, 2019 | Jojo

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R&B - Released December 20, 2018 | Clover Music

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R&B - Released December 20, 2018 | Clover Music

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Pop - Released February 21, 2020 | Heider Music Production GmbH

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Pop - Released July 28, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released March 12, 2020 | Warner Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 10, 2020 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released August 21, 2015 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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JoJo's first two albums, released in 2004 and 2006, were Top Five hits powered by some of the biggest pop singles of that era. The singer and songwriter claims that the relationship with her label, Blackground, went sour afterward because she took acting roles without giving them a cut. During a period of eight years, Blackground shelved JoJo's subsequent recordings, but she appeared on a handful of songs by other artists, including a pair on Timbaland's Shock Value II, and eventually released some mixtapes. Once she fully regained her creative freedom, she signed with major-label Atlantic and stepped toward her third album with a series of EPs. Those who kept up with JoJo won't be surprised that Mad Love, released almost exactly ten years after her second full-length, is a confident continuation of her R&B-dipped pop. The standard edition begins and ends with soul-baring ballads on which she's accompanied only by piano. In the opener, she flashes back to playing in houses her mother cleaned and hopes that her father, who died in 2015, is proudly watching her. In the closing "I Am," she seems to address those who stifled her: "Can't be that little girl no more, the one you cut up on the floor." Between those songs, there's a whole lot of living in the present through chemically-enhanced mischief, a little heartache, and some carnal vengeance. Fairweather friends and those who impede her good time are flicked aside. Everything is related in candid, occasionally explicit, terms. If she wasn't so direct with her words, the depth of feeling in her voice would be enough to convey that she's been through more than the average young adult and has been experiencing life to the hilt. Although some of the production work sounds like it could have been carried out several years earlier, obvious effort was put forth to make the album seem as 2016 as possible. Most of her collaborators and guests -- a large roster that includes Justin Tranter, Rock Mafia, Alessia Cara, and Wiz Khalifa -- arrived on the pop scene well after she established her career. The album switches styles frequently enough to bring at least a dozen imagined alternate vocalists -- including Rihanna, Emeli Sande, and any given pop-oriented retro-soul specialist -- to mind. Despite that, this is solid restart. JoJo displays more than a decade's worth of growth here as a writer and singer. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 24, 2020 | Warner Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 10, 2020 | Warner Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 13, 2020 | Jojo