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R&B/Soul - Released July 29, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

Two years after Gill's disastrous self-titled debut on Atlantic which lacked "chemistry" between Gill and producer Freddie Perren, Atlantic mocks that effort by titling Gill's new release Chemistry. These tunes find common ground with Gill's masculine baritone, and the young crooner sounds alive again. Featured here are tasty selections like "I Can't Wait Til Tomorrow," an urban-jump with a big-band sound, and the lilting "I Found Love." Linda Creed, the writer of many classics with Thom Bell, contributes her lyrical talents to three songs, including the moving ballad "Half Crazy," a dramatic, builder that Johnny nearly goes half crazy singing. There's also "Chemistry," a beautiful midtempo floater with a slick cosmic opening. ~ Andrew Hamilton
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R&B/Soul - Released March 1, 2019 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released January 1, 1990 | Motown

Johnny Gill re-established himself as a solo artist in 1990, and he did so in tremendous fashion, recording an astonishing self-titled debut for Motown that brought together the hitmaking duos Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis and L.A. & Babyface to produce an album chock-full of hits. The combination of these two duos was unprecedented. Along with Teddy Riley, they had dominated late-'80s urban radio, utterly and absolutely, churning out hit after hit after hit and co-defining the burgeoning new jack swing movement in the process. Gill likewise had recently experienced enormous success during the late '80s when, following two flat solo albums for Atlantic, he joined New Edition for its Heart Break album and its long run of hits, including "Can You Stand the Rain," a number one hit that featured him prominently. Thus it was only fitting that Motown's visionary teaming of these artists at their respective primes culminated in a set of wonderful songs, chief among them "Rub You the Right Way" (a Jam & Lewis production) and "My, My, My" (L.A. & Babyface). The former was a high-energy, pleading chart-stormer that infiltrated urban radio with brute force and sent Gill straight up the charts in the process; the song furthermore became a coast-to-coast club favorite -- and remained so for years upon years afterward, standing tall as one of the definitive new jack swing anthems of the era. The latter was the yin to "Rub You the Right Way"'s yang; it became a quiet storm favorite and even crossed over to the pop and smooth jazz markets, reprising many of the same qualities that had made Babyface's own "Whip Appeal" single such an across-the-board chart-topper only a year earlier. While nothing else on Johnny Gill quite rivaled "Rub You the Right Way" and "My, My, My," the remainder of the album still had more than its fair share of highlights. There was a second round of singles ("Fairweather Friend" was another new jack stepper, "Wrap My Body Tight" another slow jam), as well as a couple of excellent album tracks ("Feels So Much Better" and "Giving My All to You") that could have been hits for anyone else. But after four singles and a good year or so of chart saturation, Gill and Motown collected their winnings and moved on. To the continual frustration of the singer, he would be forever dogged by this unduplicatable success, an album so massive, so epochal it would become, in a sense, his ultimate legacy. And a fine legacy it is, indeed. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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R&B - Released January 1, 2003 | UNI - MOTOWN

The Millennium Collection: The Best of Johnny Gill compiles all of Gill's greatest solo efforts, including the new jack favorite "Rub You the Right Way," the passionate quiet storm ballad "My, My, My," and the smooth chart hit "Fairweather Friend." While it is nowhere as expansive as 2002's Ultimate Collection, this compiles all of Gill's major chart-toppers and a few audience favorites onto one economically sensible disc, which is perfect for the casual fan or those looking to upgrade from their cassettes without having to hunt down many of Gill's original releases. ~ Rob Theakston
$12.99

R&B - Released December 9, 2014 | J Skillz Entertainment

Johnny Gill's seventh proper studio album is markedly better than his 2011 return, Still Winning. Supported by another crop of male background vocalists, Gill once again sounds as if he's the leader of a group from time to time, but he is more prominent here, and the material -- contributed by Chuck Harmony, Claude Kelly, Gregg Pagani, and Vidal Davis, among others -- sticks a bit more. Gill benefits from a couple higher-profile collaborative songs. "This One's for Me and You" is a classy contemporary ballad made with New Edition, though it's closer to a duet between Gill and the group's Ralph Tresvant. The title track, a ballad about settling down that references sweet vintage soul and Roger Troutman at once, was produced by Babyface and Antonio Dixon. Stylistically, Game Changer is exceedingly varied. Mature contemporary sounds, sophisticated disco-funk, and Hi-like southern soul are handled with equal finesse. There's even a bit of nostalgia for the early '90s; some listeners might catch themselves thinking of Rude Boys' 1990 classic "Written All Over Your Face" while they play "Behind Closed Doors," the album's lead single. The only ill fit is the hard-charging EDM experiment "Guinevere," easy to quickly disregard and forget as the album's finale. ~ Andy Kellman
$11.49

R&B - Released January 1, 1996 | Motown

Johnny Gill released his fifth album, Let's Get the Mood Right, only a few months after he participated in the New Edition reunion. In other words, it was timed to cash in on the group's massive comeback success. If he had delivered a dud, such crass commercial planning would have been in poor taste, but it's his strongest album in years, thanks to an excellent selection of songs and a stellar cast of producers, including Babyface, Tony Rich, and Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis. Gill shines at smooth soul like the title track, but what is remarkable about the album is how comfortable he sounds with the uptempo, albeit low-key, dance numbers. It's his best, most consistent album since Johnny Gill. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$1.29

R&B - Released February 15, 2019 | Kavalry Records, LLC

$9.99

R&B - Released October 11, 2011 | Notifi Music Group

Despite his activity in New Edition, LSG, and his duets with Stacy Lattisaw, it’s hard to believe that Johnny Gill -- who has been making records since 1983 -- is on only his sixth solo album. Now on the boutique label Notifi, distributed by Fontana, Gill nonetheless works with some of the more established names in R&B, including Troy Taylor, Johnta Austin, Bryan-Michael Cox, and longtime associates Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. There’s an eyebrow-raising ballad with LSG mate Keith Sweat and Eddie Levert (father of late LSG member Gerald), produced by the late Static Major; it’s one of the album’s highlights. Throughout the album -- the first half especially -- an all-male array of background and co-lead vocalists is prominent enough to make a listener wonder if Gill has formed a new group. It’s most jarring on the title track, an obvious and awkward attempt to fit in with mainstream R&B radio. Those who are drawn to Gill’s ballads will find a few songs to enjoy, including the sparse piano/falsetto number “2nd Place,” but not much is memorable, and the singer often sounds distanced -- reflected in the album’s six sleeve photos, all of which have him in sunglasses, looking away from the camera. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released March 3, 2017 | J Skillz Entertainment

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R&B - Released January 1, 1993 | Budget (MT)

Basically, Provocative is a retread of Johnny Gill, but it's a retread done right, since Gill's voice is in prime form and the dueling production teams of Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis and L.A. Reid & Babyface make the music smooth, stylish, and funky. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$1.49

R&B - Released January 27, 2017 | J Skillz Entertainment

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Hip-O (UC)

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You can't be any hotter than R&B singer Johnny Gill was in the early '90s; he participated in five consecutive singles that hit number one or number two on the Billboard R&B charts between February 1990 and April 1991, while his self-titled label debut on Motown Records went double-platinum. Subsequent efforts were not as successful, and as of the spring of 2002, Gill had been MIA since releasing a Christmas single in 1997, but the liner notes to this collection report him to be "reportedly in the studio." Meanwhile, Hip-O's Ultimate Collection lives up to its title (as the imprint's other volumes in this series have) by lavishing 79-and-a-half minutes on a straightforward, chronological assemblage of the highlights of Gill's career, including work done for labels not controlled by Hip-O parent Universal, such the Stacy Lattisaw duet "Perfect Combination" that first came out on the Atlantic subsidiary Cotillion in 1984. An R&B singer's career these days is a dizzying combination of regular singles, soundtrack excerpts, and featured appearances on other people's records, but this compilation gathers up all of Gill's most popular recordings, including "I'm Still Waiting" from the movie New Jack City, Shanice's "Silent Prayer," and Shabba Ranks' "Slow and Sexy," the latter two guest appearances by the singer. Also included is the chart-topping New Edition song "Can You Stand the Rain," and, of course, all of Gill's own major hits, most of them written and produced by the likes of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and L.A. & Babyface, are included. (There is also one worthy album-only track, "Maybe," from 1996's Let's Get the Mood Right.) The result outdistances a previous Gill best-of, Favorites, which focused only on his Motown solo hits. For the moment, this is Johnny Gill's best so far; one can only hope there will be more. ~ William Ruhlmann