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Country - Released July 24, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Country - Released December 27, 1977 | Atlantic Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: "Illegal Smile," "Hello in There," "Sam Stone," "Donald and Lydia," and, of course, "Angel from Montgomery." Prine's music, a mixture of folk, rock, and country, is deceptively simple, like his pointed lyrics, and his easy vocal style adds a humorous edge that makes otherwise funny jokes downright hilarious. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released October 23, 2020 | Rhino Atlantic

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Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark had lain waiting for some years before John Prime succumbed to Covd-19 and joined them in April 2020 at the age of 73. The great songwriter and storyteller (who is little-known on this side of the pond but is somewhat of an idolized cult figure back home in the States) began his career as a protégé to Kris Kristofferson and recorded seven albums with Atlantic and Asylum between 1971 and 1980. All are remastered in this collection: John Prine (1971), Diamonds in the Rough (1972), Sweet Revenge (1973), Common Sense (1975), Bruised Orange (1978), Pink Cadillac (1979) and Storm Windows (1980). To understand the scale of Prine’s influence, two quotes from musicians from two different generation among thousands who flooded to social media to upon the announcement of his death. Justin Vernon aka Bon Iver: “A simple majority of who I am as a person, let alone a musician, is because of John Prine.”. Bruce Springsteen: “John and I were “new Dylans” together in the early 70s and he was never anything but the loveliest guy in the world. A true national treasure and a songwriter for the ages.” These seven albums (especially the first four), prove that John Prine was one of the great portraitists of his generation. While his dark sense of humour prevented him from sounding soppy, he nevertheless had a knack for touching hearts with empathy and humility. With Prine, anti-establishment was never low on the agenda as he fused wit and emotion with rarely seen talent… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Country - Released April 13, 2018 | Oh Boy Records

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Seeing as how Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark aren't with us any more, we'd best make the most of our remaining time with John Prine! A great songwriter who is little-known this side of the Atlantic, but adored by a cult following back home, Prine started as a protégé of Kris Kristofferson, and is anything but a sub-Dylan. Prine has even become known as one of the most underrated portraitists of his generation. And while his wry humour always protects him from any temptation towards soppiness, he also knows how to touch the heart. With Prine, above all, anti-establishment spirit is never far from the surface. It's rare to see caustic wit and pure emotion blended together with such talent… After a superb record full of mixed duets with Kacey Musgraves, Lee Ann Womack, Alison Krauss, Susan Tedeschi, Iris DeMent, Amanda Shires and Miranda Lambert, John Prine has brought out his first record in 13 years made up entirely of new songs. Produced with a certain reserve and sparseness by the now much-sought-after Dave Cobb, The Tree Of Forgiveness brings in few fellow writers (Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys, Roger Cook, Keith Sykes and Phil Spector) and a few fellow performers (Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires). At 71 years of age, the songwriter from Chicago has a voice to match his age. It has been ravaged by sickness and cigarettes, but its sound perfectly matches what he is singing. More a storyteller than an entertainer, Prine has hit the right balance between rather original mad old man and the sage who regards the world with a certain detachment and a good dose of humour. The work also speaks of death (over the last twenty years his cancer has come and gone) and his loves... Even if we have come a long way from his masterpieces of the 1970s (the self-titled John Prine but also Sweet Revenge and Bruised Orange), this 2018 work is still a lot of fun. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Country - Released September 30, 2016 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released June 4, 1999 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released July 29, 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

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Country - Released June 30, 1975 | Atlantic Records

Prine's third album is louder and more jaded than his first efforts, a set of rowdy country-rockers that tear along at a reckless speed. Sympathy takes a back seat to cynicism here, and while that strips the record of some depth, Prine's irreverence is consistently thrilling, making this one of his best. It's not as uniformly brilliant as the debut, but it did steer his music in a new direction -- where that record is often hallmarked for its rich sensitivity, Sweet Revenge established cynicism as Prine's dominant voice once and for all. Although he could still crank out a great ballad when he felt like it, from now on his records largely followed a more conventional rock & roll muse, a choice that eventually gained him more mainstream attention. "Please Don't Bury Me," "Christmas in Prison," "Blue Umbrella," and "A Good Time" are a few of the jewels on this one. © Jim Smith /TiVo
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Country - Released September 3, 1991 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 26, 2005 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 22, 2016 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 4, 1995 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released December 9, 1981 | Atlantic Records

John Prine's second album was a cut below his first, only because the debut was a classic and the followup was merely terrific. "Sour Grapes" showed Prine's cracked sense of humor and "Souvenirs" his sentiment. Even if it was the second rank of his writing, Diamonds in the Rough demonstrated that Prine had an enduring talent that wasn't exhausted by one great album. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released October 31, 2000 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released June 11, 2020 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released January 1, 1986 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released November 29, 1979 | Rhino - Elektra

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Country - Released May 25, 2010 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released November 30, 1976 | Atlantic Records

Although later superseded by Rhino's Great Days anthology, Atlantic Records' compilation of John Prine's first four albums was good for its time, and became his only gold record. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released April 7, 2009 | Oh Boy Records