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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Apple

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 1971 | Apple

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Apple

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
After the harrowing Plastic Ono Band, John Lennon returned to calmer, more conventional territory with Imagine. While the album had a softer surface, it was only marginally less confessional than its predecessor. Underneath the sweet strings of "Jealous Guy" lies a broken and scared man, the jaunty "Crippled Inside" is a mocking assault at an acquaintance, and "Imagine" is a paean for peace in a world with no gods, possessions, or classes, where everyone is equal. And Lennon doesn't shy away from the hard rockers -- "How Do You Sleep" is a scathing attack on Paul McCartney, "I Don't Want to Be a Soldier" is a hypnotic antiwar song, and "Give Me Some Truth" is bitter hard rock. If Imagine doesn't have the thematic sweep of Plastic Ono Band, it is nevertheless a remarkable collection of songs that Lennon would never be able to better again. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Apple

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The cliché about singer/songwriters is that they sing confessionals direct from their heart, but John Lennon exploded the myth behind that cliché, as well as many others, on his first official solo record, John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. Inspired by his primal scream therapy with Dr. Arthur Janov, Lennon created a harrowing set of unflinchingly personal songs, laying out all of his fears and angers for everyone to hear. It was a revolutionary record -- never before had a record been so explicitly introspective, and very few records made absolutely no concession to the audience's expectations, daring the listeners to meet all the artist's demands. Which isn't to say that the record is unlistenable. Lennon's songs range from tough rock & rollers to piano-based ballads and spare folk songs, and his melodies remain strong and memorable, which actually intensifies the pain and rage of the songs. Not much about Plastic Ono Band is hidden. Lennon presents everything on the surface, and the song titles -- "Mother," "I Found Out," "Working Class Hero," "Isolation," "God," "My Mummy's Dead" -- illustrate what each song is about, and chart his loss of faith in his parents, country, friends, fans, and idols. It's an unflinching document of bare-bones despair and pain, but for all its nihilism, it is ultimately life-affirming; it is unique not only in Lennon's catalog, but in all of popular music. Few albums are ever as harrowing, difficult, and rewarding as John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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John Lennon’s Gimme Some Truth, an extensive 4-disc compilation album, was released in 2010. Is the Autumn 2020 version an anniversary re-release? Has the music industry got to the stage where it just reissues compilations every ten years? No, not quite. This version actually celebrates Lennon’s 80th birthday (he was born 9th October 1940) and it’s more sober than the one from ten years ago. We find 36 songs that embody Lennon’s work - 36 candles that have lit up the lives of several generations. From Instant Karma and Angela to Power To The People, God and (of course) Imagine, all the classics are there. There are no unreleased tracks but the sound that makes this release original. Taken from The Beatles’ catalogue, these songs have been heavily reworked, remixed, rearranged and remastered. The sound is undoubtedly fuller, brighter and more precise. Die-hard fans might be annoyed (and perhaps rightly so) by this post-mortem facelift. Why change a sound which we’re all accustomed to and one which is such a hallmark of a certain era? But look past this and you’ll see a whole new world – one with more colours and expression. Everyone will at least agree on one thing: Lennon’s sentimental, troubled and political songs are still as relevant today as they were forty-five years ago. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 9, 1971 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released September 9, 1971 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released September 9, 1971 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Some Ultimate Collection’s can feel like a rip-off. But John Lennon’s Imagine avoids this pitfall by including many treasures, spread over four discs. This 2018 edition is organised like a journey, taking the listener from the writing process to the demo recording sessions in the former Beatle’s private studio at his home in Tittenhurst Park, near Ascot, and then to the final stages of production with crazy Phil Spector. The whole was remixed by Paul Hicks under Yoko Ono’s supervision, in the Abbey Road studios, using high definition 24/96 audio transfers from the first generation of multitrack tapes. These new mixes unveil a previously unheard sonic depth and impressive definition and clarity. The first CD features the remixed original album, the singles and B-sides. The second consists of all the outtakes and extras. The third includes the the raw studio recordings. And finally, the fourth tells the story of each song, from the demo to the final version, through a sort of audio documentary that dissects the whole album… It is fascinating to hear some of parts in isolation like the chords, the piano, or the vocals… But this generous Ultimate Collection shouldn’t draw your attention away from the essential part of it: the original album, released in September 1971. John Lennon’s post-Beatles phase was off to a flying start with an brilliant first solo attempt created with Yoko (John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band). The standard remained high on this Imagine album, with the eponymous single acquiring a legendary status (understatement) and becoming a timeless anthem of peace. Surrounded by the likes of George Harrison, Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voormann, Alan White and Jim Keltner, the man with the spectacles from Liverpool once again shows he can do it all: moving and introspective ballads, (Jealous Guy), highly poetic lyrics, pop dreams, as well as mad rock’n’roll (It’s So Hard, I Don’t Wanna Be A Soldier, Gimme Some Truth). The shock of the album comes when Lennon openly attacks his ex-comrade Paul McCartney on How Do You Sleep. All of this was produced by the mad scientist of sound, Phil Spector, who gives the album a unique quality that would go on to influence many other albums… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1975 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released January 1, 1973 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released November 17, 1980 | BEATLES CATALOG MKT (C91)

The most distinctive thing about Double Fantasy, the last album John Lennon released during his lifetime, is the very thing that keeps it from being a graceful return to form from the singer/songwriter, returning to active duty after five years of self-imposed exile. As legend has it, Lennon spent those years in domestic bliss, being a husband, raising a baby, and, of course, baking bread. Double Fantasy was designed as a window into that bliss and, to that extent, he decided to make it a joint album with Yoko Ono, to illustrate how complete their union was. For her part, Ono decided to take a stab at pop and while these are relatively tuneful for her, they nevertheless disrupt the feel and flow of Lennon's material, which has a consistent tone and theme. He's surprisingly sentimental, not just when he's expressing love for his wife ("Dear Yoko," "Woman") and child ("Beautiful Boy [Darling Boy]"), but when he's coming to terms with his quiet years ("Watching the Wheels," "Cleanup Time") and his return to creative life. These are really nice tunes, and what's special about them is their niceness -- it's a sweet acceptance of middle age, which, of course, makes his assassination all the sadder. For that alone, Double Fantasy is noteworthy, yet it's hard not to think that it's a bit of a missed opportunity -- primarily because its themes would be stronger without the Ono songs, but also because the production is just a little bit too slick and constrained, sounding very much of its time. Ultimately, these complaints fall by the wayside because Lennon's best songs here cement the last part of his legend, capturing him at peace and in love. According to some reports, that perception was a bit of a fantasy, but sometimes the fantasy means more than the reality, and that's certainly the case here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1974 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | EMI Catalogue

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The crown jewel in Apple/EMI’s extensive 2010 John Lennon remasters series, Signature Box contains all of the solo studio albums Lennon released during his lifetime (minus the trio of experimental duet LPs with Yoko Ono released on Apple and Zapple), his first posthumous album Milk and Honey, a disc of non-LP singles, a disc of home demos, but not the 2010 showcase item Double Fantasy Stripped Down, which is available only as a bonus on the indvidual reissue of Double Fantasy. It is, in other words, close enough to complete to perhaps invite a little bit of quibbling about what is absent -- Live Peace in Toronto could fit in nicely with this batch and there are outtakes from Menlove Ave missing but the real niggling comes with the home demo disc, which emphasizes demos and alternate takes of songs from Plastic Ono Band and Imagine, leaving behind demos of songs Lennon gave away, including “I’m the Greatest” and “Goodnight Vienna,” which he handed over to Ringo, and songs that never made it to one of his records. Ultimately, this is nitpicking because Signature Box is handsomely produced and contains the best-sounding Lennon remasters -- remastered by the team that did the acclaimed 2009 Beatles remasters, using the original mixes, not the recent remixes -- which is enough to make this more than worthwhile for the serious Lennon fan. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Rock - Released January 1, 1984 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released January 1, 1972 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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John Lennon’s Gimme Some Truth, an extensive 4-disc compilation album, was released in 2010. Is the Autumn 2020 version an anniversary re-release? Has the music industry got to the stage where it just reissues compilations every ten years? No, not quite. This version actually celebrates Lennon’s 80th birthday (he was born 9th October 1940) and it’s more sober than the one from ten years ago. We find 36 songs that embody Lennon’s work - 36 candles that have lit up the lives of several generations. From Instant Karma and Angela to Power To The People, God and (of course) Imagine, all the classics are there. There are no unreleased tracks but the sound that makes this release original. Taken from The Beatles’ catalogue, these songs have been heavily reworked, remixed, rearranged and remastered. The sound is undoubtedly fuller, brighter and more precise. Die-hard fans might be annoyed (and perhaps rightly so) by this post-mortem facelift. Why change a sound which we’re all accustomed to and one which is such a hallmark of a certain era? But look past this and you’ll see a whole new world – one with more colours and expression. Everyone will at least agree on one thing: Lennon’s sentimental, troubled and political songs are still as relevant today as they were forty-five years ago. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 5, 2010 | Capitol Records

Booklet
The most distinctive thing about Double Fantasy, the last album John Lennon released during his lifetime, is the very thing that keeps it from being a graceful return to form from the singer/songwriter, returning to active duty after five years of self-imposed exile. As legend has it, Lennon spent those years in domestic bliss, being a husband, raising a baby, and, of course, baking bread. Double Fantasy was designed as a window into that bliss and, to that extent, he decided to make it a joint album with Yoko Ono, to illustrate how complete their union was. For her part, Ono decided to take a stab at pop and while these are relatively tuneful for her, they nevertheless disrupt the feel and flow of Lennon's material, which has a consistent tone and theme. He's surprisingly sentimental, not just when he's expressing love for his wife ("Dear Yoko," "Woman") and child ("Beautiful Boy [Darling Boy]"), but when he's coming to terms with his quiet years ("Watching the Wheels," "Cleanup Time") and his return to creative life. These are really nice tunes, and what's special about them is their niceness -- it's a sweet acceptance of middle age, which, of course, makes his assassination all the sadder. For that alone, Double Fantasy is noteworthy, yet it's hard not to think that it's a bit of a missed opportunity -- primarily because its themes would be stronger without the Ono songs, but also because the production is just a little bit too slick and constrained, sounding very much of its time. Ultimately, these complaints fall by the wayside because Lennon's best songs here cement the last part of his legend, capturing him at peace and in love. According to some reports, that perception was a bit of a fantasy, but sometimes the fantasy means more than the reality, and that's certainly the case here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | EMI Catalogue

Booklet
Walls and Bridges was recorded during John Lennon's infamous "lost weekend," as he exiled himself in California during a separation from Yoko Ono. Lennon's personal life was scattered, so it isn't surprising that Walls and Bridges is a mess itself, containing equal amounts of brilliance and nonsense. Falling between the two extremes was the bouncy Elton John duet "Whatever Gets You Thru the Night," which was Lennon's first solo number one hit. Its bright, sunny surface was replicated throughout the record, particularly on middling rockers like "What You Got" but also on enjoyable pop songs like "Old Dirt Road." However, the best moments on Walls and Bridges come when Lennon is more open with his emotions, like on "Going Down on Love," "Steel and Glass," and the beautiful, soaring "No. 9 Dream." Even with such fine moments, the album is decidedly uneven, containing too much mediocre material like "Beef Jerky" and "Ya Ya," which are weighed down by weak melodies and heavy over-production. It wasn't a particularly graceful way to enter retirement. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 2014 | Nimbus Alliance

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John Lennon in the magazine
  • The Qobuz Minute #23
    The Qobuz Minute #23 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...