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Rock - Released November 8, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released November 8, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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50 Year Trip: Live at Red Rocks is designed as a celebration of John Fogerty's life in music, its anniversary date pegged to the release of Creedence Clearwater Revival's first album in 1968. This specific album is tied to a concert film shot at the celebrated Colorado venue on June 20, 2019, and it features a strong set list covering all of his CCR and solo signatures. Fogerty is playing with a seasoned supporting band so the performance is tight; even when the group stretches out -- which they do on "The Old Man Down the Road," "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," and "Keep On Chooglin'," the latter being the lone surprise in the set -- they never miss a mark. The precision may mean 50 Year Trip: Live at Red Rocks lacks spontaneity, but the album does showcase Fogerty at the height of his showmanship. He performed at Red Rocks to entertain the crowd by playing the hits, and what worked in concert works on record, too. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Fantasy Records

The Long Road Home: In Concert is a double-CD companion piece to the live DVD of the same name released in the summer of 2006. Appearing a couple months after the DVD, the CD has the same tracks in the same sequencing as the DVD, capturing the September 15, 2005, concert at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles in its entirety. In either incarnation, this is one terrifically entertaining performance, a spirited stroll through Fogerty's back catalog inspired by his excellent 2005 compilation, The Long Road Home, which was the first collection to contain music from both his years as Creedence Clearwater Revival's leader and as a solo act. Although the original recordings, particularly the CCR sides, remain definitive, the concert in a way makes a stronger argument than the comp for the common threads within Fogerty's body of work, since the newer tunes sit side by side with the classics, all performed by his crackerjack band featuring guitarists Bob Britt and Billy Burnette. Here, recent songs like "Hot Rod Heart," "Rambunctious Boy," and "Déjà Vu (All Over Again)" fit comfortably alongside "Green River," "Lodi," "Centerfield," "Fortunate Son," and "Proud Mary," among other Fogerty standards, because there is no difference in the sound of the recordings; it's just this terrific band playing, and the crisp and muscular performances illustrate that there's not a great difference between the rockabilly of "Blue Moon Nights" and "Looking Out My Back Door." That small but important revelation is what makes The Long Road Home: In Concert, in either its video or audio incarnation, a cut above the average live album. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

John Fogerty is many things, but predictable is not one of them. His solo career has proceeded in fits and starts, with waits as long as a decade separating solo albums, and when the records did arrive, they could be as brilliant as Centerfield or as bewilderingly misdirected as Eye of the Zombie. There was no telling what a new Fogerty record would bring, but perhaps the strangest thing about his sixth studio album, 2004's Deja Vu All Over Again, is that it's the closest thing to an average, by-the-books John Fogerty album that he's released in his solo career. Unlike its immediate predecessor, the Southern-obsessed Blue Moon Swamp, there is no unifying lyrical or musical theme, nor was it released with the comeback fanfare of that 1997 affair. Instead, Deja Vu slipped into stores in September of 2004, and its sound was as low-key as its release. Fogerty handled the arrangements and production, and while it was recorded in a professional studio in L.A. with studio veterans like drummer Kenny Aronoff and mixed by Bob Clearmountain, the album retains a homemade feel, largely because the songs are so simple and modest. Deja Vu has a little bit of everything that fits into Fogerty's signature style -- revamped rockabilly ("Honey Do," "Rhubarb Pie"), swamp rock ("Wicked Old Witch"), old-fashioned rock & roll ("Sugar-Sugar (In My Life)"), choogling minor-key jams ("In the Garden"), sweet country-tinged acoustic tunes ("I Will Walk With You"), even a protest song in the vein of "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" (the title track, a truly effective effort in drawing parallels between Vietnam and the Iraq war). While the sound on these is a little too polished, these are enjoyable songs which are somewhat undercut by a handful of cuts that recall the flailing cluelessness of Eye of the Zombie: the empty hard rocker "She's Got Baggage," the odd disco/new wave vibe of "Radar," and "Nobody's Here Anymore," where Fogerty sounds like an old fogy as he despairs about disconnected computer geeks with "a stash of Twinkies" and a bored kid in a classroom "listenin' to the rock star on a CD," when he'd be more likely to listen to rap on his iPod. These songs amount to minor bumps on a record that's otherwise pretty smooth sailing -- a relaxed, friendly collection of songs that reside comfortably within Fogerty's signature sound. At its core, it's more of a collection of songs than a unified album, and these songs are enjoyable, but modest. Apart from the title track, there are no major statements here, but there's enough craft and spirit to ensure that most Fogerty fans are bound to find several songs to actively enjoy on Deja Vu All Over Again. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Verve Forecast

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Rock - Released June 8, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Vanguard Records

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

He may have taken a decade to cut his third album, but John Fogerty wasted no time in delivering a sequel to his blockbuster 1985 comeback Centerfield, rushing Eye of the Zombie into stores in 1986. Eye of the Zombie bears every mark of being a rush job from this notorious rock & roll perfectionist, containing only a couple of songs that rival those on Centerfield -- chief among them is the doomy groove “Change in the Weather,” a tune he later salvaged with a stripped down re-recording on 2009’s The Blue Ridge Rangers Rides Again -- but what really sinks the record is its absurdly synthesized production, a clanking, cavernous collection of keyboards, squealing controlled distortion, and conflicting drum programs. To a certain extent, this unpleasantness may be intentional because at its core Eye of the Zombie is a very angry album, finding Fogerty railing against all manners of ‘80s evils, whether it’s crass consumerism, blaring headlines, or the violent policies they chronicle. Instead of pairing this doom to some swampy choogle, Fogerty sets it to too-tight synth rhythms and encases it in glassy production that not only is the antithesis of his rage, it undoes otherwise amiable cuts like the seemingly sunny soul-pop “Knockin’ on Your Door.” Track for track, it’s a misfire of staggering proportions, one that halted Fogerty’s comeback and sent him back into seclusion for another decade. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released August 26, 2016 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1973 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released October 25, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released October 25, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Fantasy Records