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Classical - Released February 3, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The profoundly moving, elegiac lyricism of Elgar and the wistful charm and brilliance of Tchaikovsky are on full display in this irresistible new Pentatone release. Composed at the end of the First World War, Elgar’s powerful Cello Concerto in E minor is one of his best-loved and most deeply-felt works. The soloist’s wrenching chords which open the work announce a mood of profound resignation and loss; gone is the youthful swagger of his earlier works, replaced instead with lonely introspection and longing, especially in the sublimely beautiful Adagio. The cello is given free rein in the vigorous final movement but the opening mood prevails as an anguished outburst from the cello brings the work to a close. No such dejection hangs over Tchaikovsky’s delightful Variations on a Rococo Theme which ooze elegance, ineffable charm and daring displays of technical brilliance. While the Pezzo capriccioso finds Tchaikovsky in a more restrained mood, with the Nocturne and Andante Cantabile he wears his romantic heart full on his sleeve. The great Russian writer Leon Tolstoy is said to have wept when he heard the Andante Cantabile and its sumptuous theme shows Tchaikovsky’s unerring gift for haunting melodies. It remains a special gem in the repertoire. The cellist Johannes Moser is no stranger to these works. Winner of the top prize at the 2002 Tchaikovsky Competition, he was also awarded the Special Prize for his interpretation of the Variations on a Rococo Theme. Described by Gramophone as “one of the finest among the astonishing gallery of young virtuoso cellists” and by The Lo Angeles Times as a musician who “…connects with the audience in a way that only great artists do”, this is Moser’s third outing for Pentatone. His first album of concertos by Dvořák and Lalo was widely praised for his “performance of enormous flair and effervescence” (BBC Music Magazine). (A Pentatone Introduction)
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Cello Concertos - Released November 2, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Lutosławski's Cello Concerto and Dutilleux’s Tout un monde lointain (also a cello concerto) are linked by their unique destinies. Both were led by Rostropovitch; both were started in 1967 and both were created by the patron in 1970. Both were performed "in the West": one in London, the other in Aix-en-Provence; and that's when things started to unravel for Rostropovich, who fell out of favour with Brezhnev's regime in the USSR. When the soloist left the USSR for good in 1974, Lutosławski's Concerto suffered the same fate in the East and was hardly played there for a long time. While the two works are perfectly contemporary, and the two composers as well, the difference between them couldn't be greater. Whilst Lutosławski's Concerto seems to describe chaos, with a soloist part that resembles a Don Quixote battling against an orchestra, Tout un monde lointain bathes in a fantastical light, where the cello is primus inter pares with the orchestra. Two visions, both so different, defended here with the same ardour by cellist Johannes Moser, who has worked on them and played them many times over, and his experience has produced a recording where every inflection is carefully chosen. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released November 18, 2016 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released August 9, 2019 | PentaTone

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This album brings together two of the most exceptional chamber musicians of the contemporary scene, whose elegance and natural flair do wonders for the works of Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn Bartholdy. Scottish pianist Alasdair Beatson plays a beautiful 1837 Érard from the Collection Edwin Beunk, a similar instrument to the one that Mendelssohn owned in his Berlin residence, where the major works of this luminous programme were first performed. Johannes Moser, on the other hand, has borrowed a sumptuous Andrea Guarneri cello of 1694 from a private patron, and its fine autumnal tones can be heard here. Not only do the partners offer up what must surely be the finest version of the two cello solos by Felix Mendelssohn on period instruments, but also they allow us to reconsider to talent of the composer's sister, Fanny Hensel, thanks to two fairly short works of hers, one Fantasy in G Minor and one Capriccio in A Flat Major. A magnificent album, which makes one hope that the duo will soon start a regular collaboration with Pentatone. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/QobuzGerman-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser and Scottish pianist Alasdair Beatson present a moving portrait of the Mendelssohn family with this recording of pieces by the siblings Felix and Fanny. Once composed for the popular "Sunday Sessions" at the Berlin Mendelssohn family house, these works fit into the typically nineteenth-century tradition of domestic music-making, albeit at the highest thinkable level. Beatson plays an 1837 Érard fortepiano, identical to the instrument that belonged to the Mendelssohn household when these pieces were composed. Besides Felix Mendelssohn’s two sonatas for cello and piano, his Variations concertantes, Op.17, Lied ohne Worte, Op.109 and Albumblatt in B Minor are featured. Fanny Hensel-Mendelssohn’s Fantasia in G Minor and Capriccio in A-flat Major show what could have become of this talented female composer if societal conventions had not restricted her musical activities to the private salon. © Pentatone
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Classical - Released September 4, 2015 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released September 2, 2014 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | PentaTone

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Chamber Music - Released July 27, 2010 | SWR Classic

Booklet
Though their composition spans nearly five decades, there is a tight connection between the three cello sonatas on this Hänssler album. Of course, each of the composers -- Bridge, Britten, and Bax -- was English; Bridge and Britten were teacher and student, respectively. But even beyond these more concrete connections, each had a special knack for writing for the cello. Bridge and Bax were particularly gifted at capturing the instruments lyrical, soulful side. Britten's sonata is certainly not without lyricism, particularly in the mournful Elegia that seems to be a direct extension of the Shostakovich sonata. In their performances, cellist Johannes Moser and pianist Paul Rivinius not only highlight these similarities, but do an especially admirable job of creating a different tone and soundscape for each sonata. The Bridge sonata benefits from an intense, robust sound with a relentless, powerful vibrato. Britten is played with a much leaner, focused sound; little vibrato; and a marked angularity and precision of rhythm. Somewhere in between is the very laid-back, comfortable, and little-performed Bax Legend-Sonata. In all cases, Moser plays with impeccable intonation; fluid bow control; clean, sweeping shifts; and clear articulation. Balance between cello and piano is excellent throughout; Hänssler's sound quality is warm and detailed without being sterile. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 1, 2008 | SWR Classic

Of all of the works written by Camille Saint-Saëns for cello and orchestra, the ones most frequently heard are those undertaken primarily by students: the First Concerto and the Op. 43 Allegro Appassionato. Though many professional artists have also recorded these somewhat rudimentary pieces, it really takes something special to make them sell with listeners. On the other end of the spectrum are the Second Concerto and the D minor Suite. Far from student works, these two compositions not only demand intense technical prowess, but also keen musical insights capable of guiding listeners through their much more abstract musings. Enter cellist Johannes Moser. His performance of the First Concerto with the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra is exceptionally dynamic, employing almost unheard of vitality and brisk tempos, free use of rubato, and sense of purpose. Equally impressive is his execution of the much more difficult Second Concerto and D minor Suite, in which Moser takes listeners by the hand and guides them every step of the way through these two sometimes under-appreciated works. His technique and intonation are rock solid, and his control of timing, pacing, and dynamics yield a wholly satisfying musical experience. Moser's tone is pure and penetrating in the higher registers and deep and throaty on his G and C strings. The Stuttgart RSO provides a brilliantly effervescent backdrop, never getting in the way of soloist. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 3, 2011 | SWR Classic

Though their national heritages differed as widely as their musical backgrounds and mature musical language, contemporaries Martinu, Hindemith, and Honegger each turned their backs on the highly popular and influential serial movement and blazed their own paths. Their cello concertos serve as ideal illustrations; from the Czech infused rhythmic intensity of the Martinu to the lean, academic focus of the Hindemith, to the nearly palpable colors and textures of Honegger, these three concertos are highly individualistic yet work quite well together on a disc. Cellist Johannes Moser appears again on the Hänssler Classic label along with the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie under Christoph Poppen for performances as vibrant and intriguing as the compositions themselves. This type of music -- which combines elements of both demanding technical bravura across the range of the instrument with moments of passionate lyrical beauty -- seems to be Moser's forte. His left hand here is staggeringly precise, no matter how big the shift, how awkward the chord, or how rapid the passagework. This technical ease allows listeners to remove their attention from the actual execution of the score and instead focus on the enjoyable musical content. Moser's sound is quite powerful, though never forced, and from low to high pitches he penetrates the sometimes dense orchestration with ease. Poppen's orchestra is just as precise and nuanced as Moser, and their collaboration results in a truly enjoyable listening experience. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2006 | SWR Classic

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Classical - To be released January 21, 2022 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | PentaTone

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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2007 | SWR Classic