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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | Evil Penguin Classic

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released April 21, 2017 | BSO Classics

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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 1997 | Claves Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Challenge Classics

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Chamber Music - Released September 30, 2014 | Claves Records

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Chamber Music - Released April 8, 2014 | Avie Records

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
This release by Norwegian cellist Jonathan Aasgaard (the principal cellist of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra) and British pianist Martin Roscoe purports to be a complete recording of Brahms' music for cello and piano. In fact it's padded with quite a few other things that have little or nothing to do with Brahms other than the fact that he composed the original music: the transcriptions of Brahms songs and Hungarian dances and of the slow movement of the Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 83, were the common currency of home music-making until recordings came along, and that of the Scherzo of the F-A-E Sonata, composed collaboratively by Robert Schumann, Albert Dietrich, and the young Brahms, is one of several versions of this violin-and-piano work made for cello. That leaves the two cello sonatas and the transcription of the Violin Sonata No. 1 in G major, Op. 78, by Brahms himself as actual Brahms works; those together are slightly longer than what will fit on a single CD, which seems to have been the motivation for the rest of the program. The violin sonata is the highlight of the whole thing; the transcription fits Aasgaard's clear, elegant tone in the cello's middle register. There is nothing much to object to in the two Brahms cello sonatas, but there are clearly new and old versions available that cut a sharper profile: those Antonio Meneses and Maria-João Pires (in the former category) and Mstislav Rostropovich and Rudolf Serkin (in the latter) come to mind. The recording is not a unified project, either artistically or sonically; the performances come from three different recording sessions, albeit all at the same venue, the church-to-concert hall conversion called the Friary in Liverpool. For chamber music it's a bit cavernous. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 7, 2016 | Celestial Harmonies

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Classical - Released September 8, 2016 | Music Blast

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Chamber Music - Released March 29, 2019 | Meridian Records

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Classical - Released July 18, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Chamber Music - Released November 27, 2015 | Evil Penguin Classic

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Second in a collection of six volumes devoted to Schubert and Brahms duets for cello and piano. The shrewdest on qobuz have already raised an eyebrow at the output of the first volume now know that between the two composers, there’s really only 2 Sonatas by Brahms and the sole Sonata Arpeggione by Schubert. Never mind, cellist Pieter Wispelwey and his regular accompanying pianist Paolo Giacometti have decided to do what has always been done, and consult the transcripts. Suddenly, we find ourselves at the head of several Schubertian fantasies, brought to life by the combined efforts of the duo, as well the Brahms sonatas for clarinet or viola, and some others derived from the flute-piano duet. The volume of the second program includes the First Sonata by Brahms and very virtuoso series of variations of Schubert originally designed for the flute. © SM / Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 30, 2007 | Onyx Classics

Not autumnal, not reflective, not reserved, and definitely not restrained, this coupling of Brahms' two string sextets may seem to some to be at best wrong-headed and at worst simply wrong. After all, isn't Brahms the composer for whom the adjective autumnal was coined and to whom the adjectives reflective, reserved, and restrained are reflexively applied? Yes, but that doesn't mean all of Brahms' music is autumnal: he was young once, too -- and the expansive and exuberant young Brahms is emotionally far from the reflective, reserved, and restrained composer of later years. As England's Nash Ensemble proves in this outstanding coupling of his early sextets in B flat major and G major, Brahms was once an ardently impetuous, even a passionately reckless composer whose themes were big, whose modulations were bold, whose developments were brave, and whose climaxes were just this side of earth-shattering. The Nash's tone is warm and full, its technique is agile and muscular, its ensemble is strong and, at times, a little scrappy, but this only serves to make points more forcefully. While older listeners may prefer the Amadeus Quartet's more autumnal performances, younger listeners -- and listeners who find Brahms sometimes too stodgy -- will enjoy the Nash's performances. Onyx's sound is a bit close, but clean and direct. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 22, 2012 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released November 21, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Altara

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Classical - Released January 16, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Chamber Music - Released April 20, 2015 | Evil Penguin Classic

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The album title The Complete Duos/Phantasie is confusing; the Brahms and Schubert sonatas and fantasy and the pair of solo movements by Max Reger don't represent a complete anything. In fact, this is the first in a projected series of albums that will cover all of the duo sonatas of Brahms and Schubert, whether written for cello and piano or not (most of them weren't). The three major works here were all written for other instruments and arranged for cello apparently by Wispelwey himself. Cellists have always poached repertory for other instruments in this way, with varied results, and so it is here. The Schubert Fantasy in C major, D. 934, sounds terrific on Wispelwey's muscular Guadagnini instrument, and the incorporation of the solo Reger movements is an excellent palate cleanser. The little Schubert Sonatina in G minor, D. 408, might also have been transcribed in this manner in its own day. The centerpiece, Brahms' Clarinet Sonata No. 2 in E flat major, Op. 120/2, would seem to be the work that made the jump to the new medium most easily: Brahms, after all, arranged the work for viola and piano. But the exquisite balances of late Brahms, in which texture plays a structural role almost as profound as in total serialism, are a bit off. It's not that the music is unsatisfying to listen to, and the interplay between Wispelwey and pianist Paolo Giacometti is subtle indeed. Recommended, with fine engineering, for those interested in expansions of the cello repertory. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released November 3, 2014 | Onyx Classics

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Classical - Released February 19, 2009 | BSO Classics

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Classical - Released November 14, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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