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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The title Page One is fitting for this disc, as it marks the beginning of the first chapter in the long career of tenor man Joe Henderson. And what a beginning it is; no less than Kenny Dorham, McCoy Tyner, Butch Warren, and Pete La Roca join the saxophonist for a stunning set that includes "Blue Bossa" and "Recorda Me," two works that would be forever associated with Henderson. Both are bossa novas that offer a hip alternative to the easy listening Brazilian trend that would become popular with the masses. Henderson and Dorham make an ideal pair on these and other choice cuts like the blistering "Homestretch" and the engaging swinger "Jinrikisha." These both show the already mature compositional prowess that would become Henderson's trademark throughout his legendary career. The final blues number, "Out of the Night," features powerful work by the leader that only hints of things to come in subsequent chapters. © TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The title Page One is fitting for this disc, as it marks the beginning of the first chapter in the long career of tenor man Joe Henderson. And what a beginning it is; no less than Kenny Dorham, McCoy Tyner, Butch Warren, and Pete La Roca join the saxophonist for a stunning set that includes "Blue Bossa" and "Recorda Me," two works that would be forever associated with Henderson. Both are bossa novas that offer a hip alternative to the easy listening Brazilian trend that would become popular with the masses. Henderson and Dorham make an ideal pair on these and other choice cuts like the blistering "Homestretch" and the engaging swinger "Jinrikisha." These both show the already mature compositional prowess that would become Henderson's trademark throughout his legendary career. The final blues number, "Out of the Night," features powerful work by the leader that only hints of things to come in subsequent chapters. © TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 3, 2019 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

This early recording by Joe Henderson is not only one of the finest of all of his recordings, but is also a high point for 1960s jazz. At this point in his career, Henderson was a full-time member of Horace Silver's combo and did not yet have a steady band in his hire. He is joined on Inner Urge by veterans of other combos: McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones from John Coltrane's unit and Sonny Rollins sideman Bob Cranshaw. The presence of these luminaries aside, Inner Urge is home to two of Henderson's best (and best-loved) compositions: "Inner Urge" and "Isotope." The leader's solo on the title track is a marvelous thing, full of melody as well as anarchic bursts of sound, which is in perfect keeping with the spirit of the song's probing, searching theme. The other musicians support Henderson nicely as well as turning in some strong solos of their own. Tyner especially sounds fantastic on this record. Although not the equal of the leader in terms of the quality of his lines or the overall sense of composition of his solos, his performance is at least the rival of Henderson's in terms of raw kinetic power. The other great song on "Inner Urge," the Monk-ish "Isotope," is another ideal showcase for Henderson's total command of his instrument. The remaining tracks on Inner Urge are also fantastic, especially the wailing cry of "El Barrio" and the Henderson-altered head to "Night and Day," but the first side, even if taken alone, is by itself enough to guarantee this album as perhaps the best Henderson recorded in his long and illustrious career, and stands easily alongside the best records of the era. © Daniel Gioffre /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1966 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Verve

With the release of this CD, the executives at Verve and their marketing staff proved that yes, indeed, jazz can sell. The veteran tenor Joe Henderson has had a distinctive sound and style of his own ever since he first entered the jazz major leagues yet he has spent long periods in relative obscurity before reaching his current status as a jazz superstar. As for the music on his "comeback" disc, it does deserve all of the hype. Henderson performs ten of Billy Strayhorn's most enduring compositions in a variety of settings ranging from a full quintet with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and duets with pianist Stephen Scott, bassist Christian McBride, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson to an unaccompanied solo exploration of "Lush Life." This memorable outing succeeded both artistically and commercially and is highly recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1985 | Blue Note Records

Blue Note's Doubletime series combines live sessions previously issued on two single albums onto one double CD. One of the first releases was Joe Henderson's brilliant tenor sax recital recorded live at the Village Vanguard in 1985. The State of the Tenor, Vols. 1 & 2 features Henderson backed only by bass and drums in a setting that pays homage to his prime stylistic source, Sonny Rollins, while displaying his prime skills in an ideal forum. The 14 selections range from customary standards to Henderson originals, and include compositions by Sam Rivers, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. It is not only a fine trio outing, but a series of performances in which Henderson strips songs to their essence, turning them into his own vision. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Verve

The third of tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson's tribute CDs on Verve was originally supposed to be a collaboration with the great bossa nova composer Antonio Carlos Jobim but Jobim's unexpected death turned this project into a memorial. Henderson performs a dozen of the composer's works with one of two separate groups: a Brazilian quartet starring pianist Eliane Elias and a jazz trio with pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Jack DeJohnette. In general, Henderson avoids Jobim's best-known songs in favor of some of his more obscure (but equally rewarding) melodies and in some cases (such as a very straight-ahead "No More Blues") the treatments are surprising. Highlights of this very accessible yet unpredictable CD include "Felicidade," "Triste," "Zingaro" and a duet with guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves on "Once I Loved," although all of the performances are quite enjoyable. Highly recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Polydor

Joe Henderson's follow-up to his hugely successful Lush Life disc is another concept album, this time involving ten songs (including many lesser-known ones) associated with Miles Davis. Henderson only actually played with Davis for a few weekends around 1967 but he shows a great deal of understanding for this potentially difficult music. With particularly strong assistance from guitarist John Scofield, bassist Dave Holland and drummer Al Foster, Henderson revives such forgotten songs as "Teo," "Swing Spring" and "Side Car" in addition to coming up with fresh interpretations of "Miles Ahead," "Milestones" and "No Blues." He is to be congratulated for not taking the easy way out and sticking to the simpler material of Davis's earlier years. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

Joe Henderson's third Blue Note release matches the very distinctive tenor with the veteran trumpeter Kenny Dorham and an unbeatable rhythm section: pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Elvin Jones. Henderson always had the ability to make a routine bop piece sound complex and the most complicated free improvisation seem logical. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Milestone

This album (which has been included in Joe Henderson's complete, eight-CD Milestone Years box set) has quite a few classic moments. At that point in time, tenor saxophonist Henderson was a sideman with Herbie Hancock's Sextet, so Hancock was happy to perform as a sideman, doubling on piano and electric piano, with the all-star group, which also includes trumpeter Mike Lawrence, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Jack DeJohnette. Highlights are many and include the original version of "Black Narcissus," "Isotope," a lyrical rendition of "Lazy Afternoon," and the free-form "Foresight and Afterthought." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

Joe Henderson's second recording as a leader features a very strong supporting cast: trumpeter Kenny Dorham (one of Henderson's earliest supporters), pianist Andrew Hill, bassist Eddie Khan, and drummer Pete La Roca. Together they perform three Dorham and two Henderson originals, advanced music that was open to the influence of the avant-garde while remaining in the hard bop idiom. The up-tempo blues "Teeter Totter" contrasts with the four minor-toned pieces and, even if none of these songs became standards, the playing is consistently brilliant and unpredictable. Even at this relatively early stage, Joe Henderson showed his potential as a great tenorman. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 10, 1993 | MPS

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Milestone

In 1999, Milestone released In Pursuit of Blackness/Black Is the Color, which contained two complete albums -- In Pursuit of Blackness (1971, originally released on Milestone) and Black Is the Color (1972, originally released on Milestone) -- by Joe Henderson on one compact disc. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

Given the recording date of Mode for Joe and the band lineup, it's easy to assume this is a straight-up hard bop album. However, this 1966 Joe Henderson record -- featuring trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Joe Chambers -- is a great example of modern jazz at its best. It was recorded during a time of sweeping musical changes due to developments in free jazz, soul-jazz, and even early experiments with fusion. It was a time when the bluesy and funky leanings of hard boppers were giving way to more individualized contemporary approaches. One of the best examples of this shift, Mode for Joe sounds more like the experimental work of Branford Marsalis than the groovy musings of Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers. The last track here, "Free Wheelin'," is the only dyed-in-the-wool hard bop tune heard here. Other than that, this outing's mostly uptempo songs serve as vehicles for solos. Henderson himself proves that the template for players such as Marsalis, Joe Lovano, and Joshua Redman was invented a generation earlier, as evidenced on "A Shade of Jade," "Black," and others, making this one of the sax legend's most intriguing albums. © TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 10, 1993 | MPS

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Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson has had a remarkably consistent career. Although he has spent periods (such as the 1970s) in relative obscurity and others as almost a jazz superstar, Henderson's style and sound has been relatively unchanged since the 1960s. This lesser-known album finds Henderson in typically fine form in an acoustic quartet with pianist Chick Corea, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Billy Higgins. Carter and Corea contribute two songs apiece, Henderson gets to perform his "Joe's Bolero" and the tenor sounds majestic on "What's New." © Scott Yanow /TiVo