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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The title Page One is fitting for this disc, as it marks the beginning of the first chapter in the long career of tenor man Joe Henderson. And what a beginning it is; no less than Kenny Dorham, McCoy Tyner, Butch Warren, and Pete La Roca join the saxophonist for a stunning set that includes "Blue Bossa" and "Recorda Me," two works that would be forever associated with Henderson. Both are bossa novas that offer a hip alternative to the easy listening Brazilian trend that would become popular with the masses. Henderson and Dorham make an ideal pair on these and other choice cuts like the blistering "Homestretch" and the engaging swinger "Jinrikisha." These both show the already mature compositional prowess that would become Henderson's trademark throughout his legendary career. The final blues number, "Out of the Night," features powerful work by the leader that only hints of things to come in subsequent chapters.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The title Page One is fitting for this disc, as it marks the beginning of the first chapter in the long career of tenor man Joe Henderson. And what a beginning it is; no less than Kenny Dorham, McCoy Tyner, Butch Warren, and Pete La Roca join the saxophonist for a stunning set that includes "Blue Bossa" and "Recorda Me," two works that would be forever associated with Henderson. Both are bossa novas that offer a hip alternative to the easy listening Brazilian trend that would become popular with the masses. Henderson and Dorham make an ideal pair on these and other choice cuts like the blistering "Homestretch" and the engaging swinger "Jinrikisha." These both show the already mature compositional prowess that would become Henderson's trademark throughout his legendary career. The final blues number, "Out of the Night," features powerful work by the leader that only hints of things to come in subsequent chapters.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 3, 2019 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

This early recording by Joe Henderson is not only one of the finest of all of his recordings, but is also a high point for 1960s jazz. At this point in his career, Henderson was a full-time member of Horace Silver's combo and did not yet have a steady band in his hire. He is joined on Inner Urge by veterans of other combos: McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones from John Coltrane's unit and Sonny Rollins sideman Bob Cranshaw. The presence of these luminaries aside, Inner Urge is home to two of Henderson's best (and best-loved) compositions: "Inner Urge" and "Isotope." The leader's solo on the title track is a marvelous thing, full of melody as well as anarchic bursts of sound, which is in perfect keeping with the spirit of the song's probing, searching theme. The other musicians support Henderson nicely as well as turning in some strong solos of their own. Tyner especially sounds fantastic on this record. Although not the equal of the leader in terms of the quality of his lines or the overall sense of composition of his solos, his performance is at least the rival of Henderson's in terms of raw kinetic power. The other great song on "Inner Urge," the Monk-ish "Isotope," is another ideal showcase for Henderson's total command of his instrument. The remaining tracks on Inner Urge are also fantastic, especially the wailing cry of "El Barrio" and the Henderson-altered head to "Night and Day," but the first side, even if taken alone, is by itself enough to guarantee this album as perhaps the best Henderson recorded in his long and illustrious career, and stands easily alongside the best records of the era. ~ Daniel Gioffre
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Verve

With the release of this CD, the executives at Verve and their marketing staff proved that yes, indeed, jazz can sell. The veteran tenor Joe Henderson has had a distinctive sound and style of his own ever since he first entered the jazz major leagues yet he has spent long periods in relative obscurity before reaching his current status as a jazz superstar. As for the music on his "comeback" disc, it does deserve all of the hype. Henderson performs ten of Billy Strayhorn's most enduring compositions in a variety of settings ranging from a full quintet with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and duets with pianist Stephen Scott, bassist Christian McBride, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson to an unaccompanied solo exploration of "Lush Life." This memorable outing succeeded both artistically and commercially and is highly recommended. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1985 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Polydor

Joe Henderson's follow-up to his hugely successful Lush Life disc is another concept album, this time involving ten songs (including many lesser-known ones) associated with Miles Davis. Henderson only actually played with Davis for a few weekends around 1967 but he shows a great deal of understanding for this potentially difficult music. With particularly strong assistance from guitarist John Scofield, bassist Dave Holland and drummer Al Foster, Henderson revives such forgotten songs as "Teo," "Swing Spring" and "Side Car" in addition to coming up with fresh interpretations of "Miles Ahead," "Milestones" and "No Blues." He is to be congratulated for not taking the easy way out and sticking to the simpler material of Davis's earlier years. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released August 10, 1993 | MPS

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Jazz - Released August 10, 1993 | MPS

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Milestone

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

Joe Henderson's third Blue Note release matches the very distinctive tenor with the veteran trumpeter Kenny Dorham and an unbeatable rhythm section: pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Elvin Jones. Henderson always had the ability to make a routine bop piece sound complex and the most complicated free improvisation seem logical. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Verve

On this 1996 recording, improbably the first to ever feature him leading a big band, the inimitable Joe Henderson assembled nine compositions (seven of which were self-penned) and a topnotch band for a very interesting record. Volumes have been written about Henderson as a soloist but, on Big Band, even the longest-term Henderson fan gets to hear his prodigious skills as a big band arranger for the first time. Influenced by Bill Holman and Bill Russo as much as by classical composers Igor Stravinsky and Bela Bartok, his charts are cool and sophisticated. Of course, Henderson's cause is helped by the absolutely unquestioned majesty of the core material, as well as a fine batch of co-soloists, including Chick Corea, Christian McBride, and Freddie Hubbard. The Slide Hampton-arranged "Isotope" is one of the finest moments on the record, with an almost amusingly dramatic introduction that evokes a film noir score before it accelerates into the famous theme. Corea's solo is absolutely masterful, a headlong rush into nothingness that somehow manages to land on its feet. When laid side by side, his solos often outstrip the leader's in their inventiveness and capability to draw the listener into the song. This is not, however, to downplay the contributions of the leader as a soloist; Henderson's tenor is as lovely as ever. Fantastic solos notwithstanding, it is the wonderful arrangements of these deservedly classic songs that make this album so valuable. Listen to the Robin Eubanks-led trombone section in "A Shade of Jade" for a quick taste of what it sounds like when everything about a big band comes together just so. There is not a lot to dislike about Joe Henderson's first recorded foray into big-band arranging. Recommended. ~ Daniel Gioffre
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Fantasy Records

This album has trumpeter Luis Gasca featured as a co-star with tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson. Gasca arranged "Tres Palabras" which is played by a 13-piece group (Oscar Brashear takes the trumpet solo) while the other three originals (two by pianist Mark Levine) use either a sextet or a nonet. Henderson is in fine form on these spirited Latinish performances which have also been included on his eight-CD Milestone box set. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1973 | Concord Records, Inc.

Multiple is a bellwether album for jazz fans. You can tell a lot about listeners' ear and where their tastes reside based on whether they're big fans of Multiple, indifferent toward it, or don't like it at all. Joe Henderson's career arc has three major nodes -- his hard bopping '60s era, his '70s fusion stint, and his later reincarnation as a Grammy-winning, critically acclaimed, standard-blowing sage. Of these three, Henderson's '70s run is often underappreciated or, in some cases, dismissed and even mildly maligned. The detractors are usually those with more traditional and, at times, stodgy ears. Hip cats -- "with-it cats," as they said in the '70s -- loved Multiple Joe, Afrocentric Joe, semi-militant Joe, grooving Joe, burnin' Joe. Multiple is probably Henderson's greatest album from this era and its fans share a cult-kinship. Whereas most fusion artists of the day were spiking their jazz with rock guitar and "elements" of funk, there was a certain set (Gary Bartz, for example) who offered concentrated, pungent funk. You won't find a bassline like Dave Holland's "Turned Around" on a Return to Forever album. It's the Multiple rhythm section (Holland, a maniacally drumming Jack DeJohnette, and pianist Larry Willis) that makes it such a nasty set. The album's classic cut, "Tress-Cum-Deo-La," doesn't walk or bop; it struts with a pronounced limp, like the fellas who swaggered up urban avenues with tilted fedoras. And then there's Henderson, blowing some of the most impassioned solos of his career. There's an activism to his phrasing; you could hear it on Sly Stone records, but you could feel it here. That songs as majestic as "Bwaata" almost feel like afterthoughts is a tribute to this album's thorough mean streak. Those ignorant to the import of Henderson's Milestone albums -- especially Multiple -- might scoff at such high praise for what is viewed by some as a nonessential album thrown into the Henderson discography. Such is life for the unhip. ~ Vincent Thomas