Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$9.99

Folk/Americana - Released August 30, 2019 | No Quarter

A worthy air to Sandy Denny, Vashti Bunyan, Joan Baez, Linda Thompson, Nick Drake and, more suitably, Gillian Welch, the American Joan Shelley carries on their torch. The folk singer from Louisville who had Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy produce her eponymous 2017 debut album continues her scenic journey with a unique and moving grace. The melodies and rhythms of songs on Like the River Loves the Sea contain fragments of the multiple musical traditions that make up the sonority of her native Kentucky: Irish, British, African to only mention a few. For Shelley, “the most beautiful music is that which converses with the all-seeing divine, the trees and ancient beings that are witnesses to the entirety of human history. These songs represent part of this conversation.” And this divinity is indeed present on titles such as When What It Is where a tranquil piano envelops a guitar and pure vocals; the result is dumbfounding… Much like her predecessors, Joan Shelley is never superfluous and delivers an incandescent folk artistry. Calm moments and silences allow her to create an atmosphere of beauty and purity. Less is more, more than ever… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released May 5, 2017 | No Quarter

Joan Shelley waited until she had recorded her fifth album before self-titling it with her own name. A way for the Kentucky folk artist to show that this record is the one that says the most about her? To be sure, it is her most personal and intimate work. With a great austerity that highlights the beauty of her voice and the tenor of her words, this 2017 offering marks a first collaboration with an artist from outside her habitual circle. And not just any artist: Jeff Tweedy. Wilco's wisdom has seen this album produced with care and sobriety, succeeding in bringing out each note, each word, each arrangement as if it has been delivered direct to the audience's eardrums. Even the levels on the acoustic guitars are handled with care. This superb folk record is above all marked by space and silence. We could name Shelley the spiritual daughter of Sandy Denny, Vashti Bunyan or Linda Thompson; but the quality of her self-titled record makes her an artist in her own right, and it would be right to leave behind the kind of confidentiality in which she has been unjustly confined.
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 4, 2015 | No Quarter

The third solo outing from the spell-casting Kentucky songstress, Over and Even is a breezy, lyrically bold, sonically beautiful soft barrage of bucolic country-folk that evokes Linda Thompson, Joni Mitchell, Vashti Bunyan, and Hem. It would be easy to peg Shelley and crafty six-string co-conspirator Nathan Salsburg as the Bluegrass State's answer to Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, but they lack that duos' trad-folk stridency and penchant for dust bowl pageantry, and their particular brand of mountain music feels much more rooted in the immigrant-rich Appalachian traditions, where a misty morning is just as likely to invoke fog rising over the Shannon or the Thames as it is the Mississippi. Recorded in an old farmhouse with very few takes, the 12-track set feels rooted but not rootsy. Highlights like "Brighter Than the Blues," "No More Shelter," "Stay on My Shore," and the hypnotic title track are as spectral as they are homey, due in large part to Shelley's unfussy, yet poetic lyrics and warm, open-hearted voice, which is easy like Sunday morning, but carries with it the burdens of the week prior. Salsburg peppers each of these songs with tasteful runs seasoned with generous amounts of reverb, and between the two, it's a wonder that they manage to keep things from simply rising up out of the valley and into the ether, but like fellow Kentuckian Bonnie "Prince" Billy, who lends his high and lonesome croon to three of the quietly magnificent Over and Even's best cuts, there's a bold stroke of genial Southerness that runs through the music and keeps things tempered, honest, and effortlessly authentic, despite a predilection for eccentricity. ~ James Christopher Monger
CD$1.29

Pop - Released August 22, 2019 | No Quarter

CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 30, 2014 | No Quarter

The second long-player from the Louisville-based singer/songwriter with one foot in the deep bluegrass of Kentucky and the other in the rocky crags of Laurel Canyon, Electric Ursa finds Joan Shelley, who resides somewhere between Joni Mitchell, Laura Marling, and Gillian Welch, recording in her hometown with My Morning Jacket and Andrew Bird producer Kevin Ratterman. Intimate, warm, and soulful, the album features eight evocative original songs, including "Something Small," "First of August, "Long Way to Night," and the languid title track. ~ James Christopher Monger
CD$1.29

Pop - Released July 16, 2019 | No Quarter

CD$1.19

Folk/Americana - Released August 30, 2016 | No Quarter

CD$1.29

Pop - Released June 11, 2019 | No Quarter

CD$1.19

Folk/Americana - Released October 17, 2014 | No Quarter