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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2019 | Wicked Cool Records

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Rock - Released July 19, 2019 | Wicked Cool Records

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Reggae - Released August 16, 2019 | Wicked Cool Records

Reggae - Released June 3, 2019 | Wicked Cool Records

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Pop/Rock - Released January 28, 2003 | Vanguard

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Pop/Rock - Released June 29, 2004 | Vanguard

With New York City in his back pocket once again, Jesse Malin continues his serenade to lost loves and forgotten opportunities on his second album, The Heat. He kicks his best buddy, Ryan Adams, out of the production seat to take care of things himself and once more cuts apart his honest heart. Isn't that why most become musicians, to deal with the fear of loss and regret? Their wounded soul becomes their art and a way of dealing with the bad hand they got dealt. It's good therapy for most artists and a cold-water cure for a lot of music fans, but relying on that formula itself doesn't automatically make a great record. The Heat goes through the motions of telling stories and Malin is a charmer with his self-pitying poetics. Songs such as the false sexual gratification of "Arrested," the rompish skip and run of "Mona Lisa," and the haunted political errors of "New World Order" are loaded in affection and raw roots rock. Malin's drag racer-like desire to find some kind of solace with love is even more fierce on "Hotel Columbia," an excellent piano-guitar dalliance that never lets up. But no matter how much The Heat yearns for common ground, Malin's songwriting suffers somewhat. He's skilled and inventive with his work as a musician, but the aches and pains of songs like "Swinging Man" and "God's Lonely People" fall short of what Malin delivered on The Fine Art of Self-Destruction. It's as if he's reaching for something, but uncertain of what he's supposed to be reaching for. That's okay. The Heat is only Malin's second album and shouldn't be categorized as a slump. Sonically, he's progressing into a real cowboy balladeer without dismissing his punk days. The desperation of "Since You're in Love" makes this evident; however, lyrics like "I'm still sad over you" aren't poignant enough. Malin has what it takes to write a really beautiful love song, one full of love's usual blood and guts. Perhaps he's terrified -- like most people are -- of owning up to the fear of losing it or never having it? ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Rock - Released February 26, 2016 | One Little Indian

Jesse Malin has come a long way from his glam rock heyday of fronting D Generation, and his solo debut, The Fine Art of Self Destruction, is an impressive look at Malin's musical maturation. He's a crooner, an Americana caterwaul, and a picaro of his native New York City, but a lonesome one at that. The Fine Art of Self Destruction displays a hearty mix of bittersweet alt-country ("Queen of the Underworld") and ballsy roots rock ("Wendy"), but the album is fully supported with a punk rock edge that Malin's most familiar with. Having ex-Whiskeytown frontman Ryan Adams in the production seat is a great fit, for both he and Malin's love-sucker hearts dance around the soft-hued beauty of each song. One might sense a slight hesitation in Malin's presentation, but it's not distracting. Malin's flight-or-fight theme on The Fine Art of Self Destruction is what makes this album an enjoyable introduction. He sifts through personal confusion on all different levels, and Adams has captured Malin's most intimate moments. "Almost Grown," layered with candied guitar licks, recounts being a child of divorce, while "Xmas" is a bit more angelic with its lush string arrangements. Those tender years of being a kid are hell, and Malin isn't afraid in reminding all of his listeners that time shapes one's character as well, and that's what The Fine Art of Self Destruction is about: regardless of where your home is, find your focus and don't get lost. In "Cigarettes and Violets," Malin warbles: "Messed up like a prizefight/At least you could have tried/Messed up like the system/You used to call a sin," and it's so raw you can tell Malin's heart is breaking and mending ten times over. There's no regret here, but Malin makes it alright to talk about what could have happened. He's done an intricate, stunning job. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2010 | One Little Indian

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Reggae - Released June 14, 2019 | Wicked Cool Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 31, 2015 | One Little Indian

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2015 | One Little Indian

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Rock - Released June 30, 2017 | MRI

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 20, 2015 | One Little Indian

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Pop/Rock - Released April 23, 2010 | SideOneDummy Records