Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$10.99
CD$7.49

Bebop - Released January 24, 2020 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Jazz trumpeter Jeremy Pelt has explored a variety of settings on his albums, from driving acoustic hard bop to electrified funk and even electronic music. With 2020's dusky The Art of Intimacy, Vol. 1, he shifts gears yet again, settling into a drummerless trio format on a warmly attenuated set of ballads. The album is stark contrast to his ambitious 2019 effort, The Artist, which found him drawing inspiration from the sculptures of Auguste Rodin. Where that album showcased his ear for harmonically expansive post-bop in the vein of Woody Shaw, here he strips his approach down to the essentials. Joining him are two highly regarded jazz veterans, pianist George Cables and bassist Peter Washington. Both players have a long association with the trumpeter, including Washington being the godfather of Pelt's son and Cables having known him since right after he graduated from Berklee in the late '90s. The trio bring all of that musical and life experience to bear here on a mix of originals and lesser-played standards. The album opens with Pelt's deceptively straight-forward "Love Is Simple." Built around a lyrical, twice-repeated eight-bar phrase, the song nonetheless affords the band plenty of room to stretch out. From there, they wrap themselves in the languid glow of the Rodgers and Hart classic "Little Girl Blue," with Cables framing Pelt's fuzzy trumpet lines in delicately reharmonized chords and Washington offering a warm bowed solo. Similarly enveloping are Pelt's Harmon-muted songs, including "Always on My Mind" (the Johnny Green/Norman Newell song, not the Willie Nelson tune) and the soulful Lee Adams and Charles Strouse composition "I've Just Seen Her" from the 1962 musical All American. Elsewhere, they offer a far-eyed and bluesy reading of Cables' "Ebony Moonbeams" and cull ever richer emotional veins out of Lucky Thompson's "While You Are Gone." Pelt and Washington even pare down to a duo for the wryly improvised and painterly slow-blues "Ab-o-lutely." A perfect example of the less-is-more philosophy, The Art of Intimacy, Vol. 1 maximizes the personal and musical connections between Pelt and his trio bandmates. © Matt Collar /TiVo
HI-RES$6.25$12.49(50%)
CD$4.00$7.99(50%)

Bebop - Released February 8, 2019 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$6.75$13.49(50%)
CD$4.50$8.99(50%)

Bebop - Released January 20, 2017 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Trumpeter Jeremy Pelt occupies an enviably open-minded space in the modern jazz landscape. A capable traditionalist, Pelt has built his career around making acoustic post-bop, with increasing forays into electrified, electronic-tinged fusion. His mutable choices keep you in suspense as a listener -- you’re never sure what to expect from one album to the next. While there are no such electronic flourishes on Pelt's 2017 effort, the warmly sophisticated Make Noise!, it still pops with much of the same cross-genre creativity he's explored in the past. The album follows his similarly inclined 2016 effort #Jiveculture, which also featured an inventive acoustic sound accented by legendary bassist Ron Carter. This time out, Pelt brings along a slightly less-high-profile, if no less talented, ensemble including pianist Victor Gould, bassist Vicente Archer, drummer Jonathan Barber, and percussionist Jacquelene Acevedo. Together, they take an intimate approach to expansive post-bop that straddles the line between Miles Davis' '60s albums and Terence Blanchard's early-'80s work. Pelt has a broad, enveloping trumpet tone and a knack for laying down highly engaging solos that never hold a listener at arm's length. It's a skill he puts to good use throughout Make Noise! and one complemented by his bandmates, especially pianist Gould, who layers these tracks with a sparkling delicacy reminiscent of the late Mulgrew Miller. Similarly, with Acevedo's kinetic percussion filtered throughout, Make Noise! also has a strong Afro-Latin influence, a vibe especially apparent on the roiling title track and frenetic, salsa-infused "Bodega Social." Equally compelling, "Chateau d'Eau" has a languid, R&B-inflected melody set to a midtempo Afro-Latin groove. Elsewhere, Pelt pushes toward harmonically nuanced modalism, offering a fittingly elegiac and noir-ish tribute to the departed pop icon on "Prince," and evincing the angular, classically influenced style of Black Codes-era Wynton Marsalis on "Cry Freedom." While much of Pelt's work fits nicely into the jazz canon, he clearly has an open ear for melody, a gift he exercises on "Your First Touch...", which sounds like a Leonard Cohen song reworked as a sensuous jazz ballad. Ultimately, Make Noise! continues to reveal Pelt's maturation into a confident artist, comfortable enough with his place in the jazz tradition to keep subtly pushing the edges of audience expectation. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released January 31, 2012 | HighNote Records

On Soul, trumpeter and composer Jeremy Pelt's third offering for High Note, his stellar quintet with saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver is intact, having been together for nearly six years. That said, where his first two offerings for the label were exceptional exercises in on-the-edge post-bop and modal jazz, Soul looks all the way back to 2003's Close to My Heart for comparison -- one that reveals just how far Pelt has come as a composer, a soloist, and an arranger. Soul is a collection of (mostly) blues and ballads. He wrote all but two of the album's eight tunes: the Sammy Cahn standard "Moondrift" (on which the band is fronted by vocalist Joanna Pascale) and a lively reading of George Cables' "Sweet Rita Suite, Pt. 2: Her Soul." Pelt and his band recorded this set in a single day, and had nuanced it all live before hitting the studio. On display here are intimacy, nuance, elegance, and an adventurous communication that is nearly symbiotic -- traits not normally associated with ballads or blues (these days, anyway). The frontline of Pelt and Allen is in perfect sync throughout, whether the two are playing counterpoint ("The Ballad of Ichabod Crane") or in unison ("The Story"). The exchange between ballads and blues is fluid. The former is an example of both existing side by side because of Pelt's structural harmonic development and Grissett's confident pianism. On "The Tempest," Burno and Cleaver push Grissett, who responds with flurries of notes and then the horns. The rhythm section's freedom is balanced by the horn solos and brief, contrapuntal head. On "Moondrift," Pascale is able to extract from her delivery every unnecessary utterance; Pelt is known for his sharp sense of economy, and Pascale rises to the challenge with a lovely, disciplined vibrato that allows the band to create shades of meaning behind her. The set's longest tune, "What's Wrong Is Right," commences with a slightly dissonant, Monk-esque harmonic statement and features excellent solos from Pelt, Grissett, and Allen; Burno and Cleaver drive them relentlessly, all the while swinging like mad. Soul is another high-water mark for Pelt and company, and an exercise in taking the tradition and giving it a thoroughly modern twist without sacrificing its heart. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
HI-RES$5.50$10.99(50%)
CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released March 6, 2018 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released January 26, 2010 | HighNote Records

Cut in August 2009, Men of Honor initiated California-born trumpeter Jeremy Pelt's involvement with Joe Fields' New York-based HighNote record label. For this auspicious debut, Pelt teamed up with Los Angeles pianist Danny Grissett, Philadelphian bassist Dwayne Burno, and two of Detroit's finest exponents: tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen and master percussionist Gerald Cleaver. Men of Honor consists of a set of eight original compositions that brings to mind the coolly creative, mainstream, pre-electric works of Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, and Miles Davis. It is a deliberately drawn salute to certain musical traditions established in the late '50s and early '60s which have endured and been extended by young artists enraptured by the harmonic poetics of early modern jazz. Comparisons abound in the literature surrounding Pelt and his peers. This is inevitable as the influences run thick throughout his gradually expanding discography. He clearly came up listening to the Jazz Messengers, Wayne Shorter, and the young Wynton Marsalis. This thoughtful, well-crafted music is recommended for relaxation on a foggy day, or intuitive navigation after dark. © arwulf arwulf /TiVo
HI-RES$5.50$10.99(50%)
CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released January 15, 2016 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Taking a more stripped-down approach than the expansive electric path he's been pursuing since 2013's Water and Earth, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt's 2016 album, #Jiveculture, is a visceral exploration of small-group post-bop. It's also Pelt's first album featuring legendary bassist and Miles Davis associate Ron Carter. Also joining Pelt here are longtime bandmates pianist Danny Grissett and drummer Billy Drummond. While Pelt has never completely eschewed swinging, harmonically challenging, straight-ahead jazz, his previous efforts, Water and Earth, Face Forward, Jeremy, and Tales, Musings, and Other Reveries were notable for their more experimental flourishes that combined Pelt's love of hip-hop and electronic dance music with his reverence for '70s-era jazz fusion, à la Miles Davis' Bitches Brew. For much of his career though, Pelt has excelled at the kind of organic, modal-based jazz that Davis played in the mid-'60s. This is the approach he takes on #Jiveculture and one that works perfectly with the addition of Carter, whose languid, supple bass style helped to define modern jazz. Here, Pelt and company dive headlong into a set of originals and lesser-played standards, including a jaunty take on Carter's own "Einbahnstrasse." Similarly compelling is the relaxed midtempo swinger "Dream Dancing," which brings to mind both mid-'50s Miles and '80s Wynton Marsalis. Davis is also evoked on the angular "The Haunting" and the lyrical, sad-eyed ballad "Akua," with Pelt utilizing a plaintive Harmon mute. Ultimately, while #Jiveculture is a more stripped-down, traditional jazz production than Pelt's previous releases, it's also one of his more densely packed, flowing with harmonic and melodic ideas that are all the more striking when set against the straight-ahead framework of a quartet. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 25, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

At 27, this amazingly versatile jazz trumpeter has a resumé that leads to huge expectations. His ensemble work has encompassed Ravi Coltrane, Roy Hargrove, Ralph Peterson, Cassandra Wilson, Greg Osby, and the Mingus Big Band. Pelt topped the 2003 Down Beat magazine annual critics poll for Rising Star on Trumpet, and the Jazz Journalist Association selected him as one of the Best Emerging Stars in Jazz. On his debut for the Maxjazz Horn Series, he brings along luminaries Mulgrew Miller, Peter Washington, and Lewis Nash, but it's clear he could be jamming with a bunch of no-names and be equally as emotional and engaging. The joy here comes from the unexpected fluctuations in tone and vibe from track to track. Charles Mingus' "Weird Nightmare" is given a lyrical, reflective twist, backed by a film score-lush orchestra. Just as one is settling into dreamscape mode, Pelt goes bop, swinging cool and funky over his understated trio on "Excerent" and going even wilder on the quick-grooving "Take Me in Your Arms." On "502 Blues (Drinkin' & Drivin')," he chills with his romantic-minded flügelhorn. Pelt seems just as comfy in either mode, but the upbeat gems are the ones that show him at his most inventive. Pelt continues to live up to the promise of all those accolades. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 25, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

Jeremy Pelt formed a new quintet prior to the making of November, featuring tenor saxophonist JD Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver. Just 31 at the time of the sessions, Pelt has developed into one of the top trumpeters of his generation, developing a distinctive sound of his own. For his fourth Maxjazz release, he composed nine striking originals, beginning with the free-form introduction "Mata" (honoring his grandmother), which adds his cousin Jeff Haynes on percussion. Pelt's trumpet and the ensemble passages shine in "Avatar," while he adds a mute for the snappy "Clairvoyant," also showcasing Burno. The exchanges between Pelt and Allen are fueled in the breezy post-bop cooker "Phoenix" by Burno and Cleaver. The tension in "466-64 (Freedom Fighters)" is hardly surprising, as it was inspired by Pelt's visit to Nelson Mandela's tiny prison cell (in which he was incarcerated for 20 years), with the insistent rhythm backing the brisk yet haunting theme played by trumpet and tenor sax. Yet the most memorable piece may be Pelt's gorgeous ballad "Rosalie," with Grissett providing spacious accompaniment in this duo setting. Highly recommended! © Ken Dryden /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released August 28, 2001 | Fresh Sound Records

Jeremy Pelt makes his debut as a leader with Profile, a nearly all-original outing that features Robert Glasper on piano, Gerald Cannon on bass, and Ralph Peterson on drums. Tenor saxophonist Jimmy Greene also plays on all but two tracks, while altoist Jaleel Shaw and guitarist Mike Moreno lend their talents on one tune apiece. In addition to his formidable trumpet chops, Pelt displays a mature and engaging compositional voice. On "Pieces of a Dream" and the bright bossa "We Share a Moon," he builds forms around unexpected rhythmic contours, pushing himself and the band well beyond the safe zone. He also gets tremendous results by leaving the groove loose, as on the opening "Aesop's Fables" and the longest piece, "Jigsaw." The latter comes to a rolling boil when Glasper, one of jazz's most promising young pianists, lays out and yields the floor to Greene's hell-raising tenor. But Pelt has a cooler, melodic side as well; he brings it out on "A Song for You" and the closing quartet ballad, "You Won't Forget Me." Cannon and Peterson, the session's veterans, provide a robust rhythmic engine without overshadowing Pelt's precocious musicianship. © David R. Adler /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Criss Cross Jazz

CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released January 14, 2011 | HighNote Records

Jeremy Pelt's 2011 effort, The Talented Mr. Pelt, features the same working ensemble the trumpeter has used since 2007, which includes tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver. In many ways, the album is a similarly inclined mix of adventurous, on-the-edge, post-bop and modal jazz that featured on Pelt's stellar 2010 album, Men of Honor. A forward-thinking improviser with an ear for late-'60s Miles Davis and '70s Woody Shaw, Pelt pushes the brass envelope as much as possible and can engage a listener quite well on record. In that sense, you never get a canned or predictable moment on The Talented Mr. Pelt. Tracks like the funky, off-kilter waltz "Paradise Lost" and the forceful, rough-around-the-edges "Pulse" are terrific modern jazz numbers that bring to mind both the dreamy compositions of saxophonist Wayne Shorter and the early, firebrand work of trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. Similarly, the gorgeous later-album ballad "Only" and the driving, eyes-toward-the-horizon closer "David and Goliath," while coming at group interplay from different emotional directions, find Pelt and his ensemble working as a cohesive unit of like-minded individuals who truly seem to dig playing with each other. Of all of Pelt's prodigious talents showcased on The Talented Mr. Pelt, clearly the ability to pick musically sympathetic and daring sidemen makes the album a joy to hear. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 25, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

Jeremy Pelt is a very talented trumpeter with a large sound and a creative style influenced by Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw. On Identity, the music ranges from early-'70s Miles Davis-type fusion ("Eye of the Beholder" and "Scorpio") to a fiery tradeoff with vibraphonist Warren Wolf ("Angular"), from moody ballads with lots of space and Pelt's muted horn to post-bop romps. Joined by a rhythm section that includes the many keyboards of Frank LoCrasto with occasional contributions from Wolf and Myron Walden on soprano and bass clarinet, Pelt is the main star throughout this project. None of his ten originals are destined to become standards in the future, but his playing is versatile, inventive, and filled with fresh ideas. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$4.00$7.99(50%)

Bebop - Released January 21, 2014 | HighNote Records

Beginning with 2005's Identity, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt began exploring '70s and '80s funk and fusion sounds inspired by the works of such luminaries as Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis. He continued these funk and electronic explorations on such albums as 2007's Shock Value: Live at Smoke and 2013's Water and Earth. While Pelt has also split his time playing and recording more straight-ahead post-bop albums, his 2014 album, Face Forward, Jeremy, combines the best of his acoustic recordings with the electronic-jazz hybrid sound of Water and Earth. Here, Pelt is joined by his longtime ensemble featuring pianist/keyboardist David Bryant, saxophonist Roxy Coss, bassist Chris Smith, and drummer Dana Hawkins. Also featured are vocalists Fabiana Masili and Milton Suggs, along with Rhodes keyboardist Frank LoCrasto and a handful of string players. This is a languid, atmospheric album that touches upon impressionistic, modal post-bop, soulful contemporary R&B, and groove-oriented '70s-style fusion. Tracks like "Princess Charlie" hang on a wordless vocal melody from Masili (mirrored by Pelt and Coss) that leads into adventurous improvisations from Pelt, Coss, and Bryant. "Rastros," once again showcasing Masili, is an Asian and Brazilian-inflected ballad punctuated by delicate harp lines, with Pelt on a beautiful, muted solo. Elsewhere, cuts like "Stars Are Free" sound like something along the lines of '70s Miles Davis, and "The Secret Code" features a frenetic jungle/drum'n'bass-influenced intro from Hawkins. Ultimately, Pelt's Face Forward, Jeremy is a high-minded, well-crafted mix of cutting-edge acoustic and electric jazz that gently turns your ears toward the future of jazz, while never asking you to let go of the music's past. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$4.00$7.99(50%)

Bebop - Released January 29, 2013 | HighNote Records

On 2012's outstanding Soul, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt showcased the fruit of his ensemble's six-plus years working together, gelling into a seamlessly cohesive, intuitive unit who knew how to push one another in the studio as well as on the bandstand. But all things change. On Water and Earth, Pelt's fourth date on HighNote, he showcases an entirely different band, playing a very different music. The lineup features seasoned veterans including bassist Burniss Earl Travis and percussionist Jeffrey Haynes, alongside somewhat younger players such as pianist David Bryant, saxophonist Roxy Coss, and drummer Dana Hawkins. The music on Water and Earth is a study in contrasts, using post-bop and circular rhythms together, adding in electric elements and more open spaces. Opener "Reimagine the World" is a laid-back, shuffling groove fueled mainly by Pelt's limpid horn and Bryant's tight chord voicings, before Angela Roberts and Fabiana Masili add their chorus of wordless voices which surprise near the exit. "Mystique" is a loosely composed melody offered by Coss' soprano atop Hawkins and Haynes before being joined by Travis, Bryant's Rhodes, and Pelt pushing over the top. The intro to "Boom Bishop" is all percussive fire with an incendiary, furious head shared by Pelt and Coss" tenor. She solos first, double-timed by Hawkins and Haynes offering a fluid series of breaks and driving accents. Pelt follows using a wah-wah pedal in his own solo. Bryant's punchy Rhodes and Travis' acoustic and electric bass set up a circular rhythmic interplay that locks the tune in. Other than on the lovely, straight-ahead ballad "Meditations on a Conversation We Had," Pelt uses effects on all following tracks. His attempt at a spacy R&B on "Stay," with Ra-Ra Valverde on vocals, simply doesn't work. "Pieces of a Dream" is a knottier post-bop tune, albeit one played with electric instruments, and it features excellent solo work by Bryant. In addition, the interplay between Travis, Hawkins, and Haynes is killer. The closer "Butterfly Dreams" is a floating ballad and among the most beautiful tunes on the set, with lovely restrained work from Pelt and Bryant, as well as gorgeous layers of brushed cymbals. On Water and Earth, the trumpeter is surely reaching for something new. At its best it is compelling, noteworthy; elsewhere, his search proves mercurial and elusive. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$3.75$7.49(50%)

Bebop - Released January 20, 2015 | HighNote Records

Jeremy Pelt's 12th studio album, 2015's Tales, Musings and Other Reveries, finds the trumpeter continuing on his trajectory of making swaggering yet artful and introspective post-bop. The album follows up his equally compelling releases, 2013's Water and Earth and 2014's Face Forward, Jeremy. As with those albums, Pelt succeeds here in combining all of his disparate stylistic inspirations -- from swinging, straight-ahead jazz to expansive modalism to soulful fusion -- into one cohesive sound that is never anything but organic. Even his bold choice of using two drummers here, Billy Drummond (heard in the right channel) and Victor Lewis (heard in the left), never gets in the way of creating utterly lithe, buoyant, and often gorgeous music. Also joining Pelt here are pianist Simona Premazzi and maverick, genre-defying bassist Ben Allison, who add their own forward-thinking touches to Pelt's sophisticated compositions. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Sharp Nine Records