Similar artists

Albums

$12.49
$7.99

Bebop - Released February 8, 2019 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
$10.99
$7.49

Bebop - Released March 6, 2018 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
$13.49
$8.99

Bebop - Released January 20, 2017 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Trumpeter Jeremy Pelt occupies an enviably open-minded space in the modern jazz landscape. A capable traditionalist, Pelt has built his career around making acoustic post-bop, with increasing forays into electrified, electronic-tinged fusion. His mutable choices keep you in suspense as a listener -- you’re never sure what to expect from one album to the next. While there are no such electronic flourishes on Pelt's 2017 effort, the warmly sophisticated Make Noise!, it still pops with much of the same cross-genre creativity he's explored in the past. The album follows his similarly inclined 2016 effort #Jiveculture, which also featured an inventive acoustic sound accented by legendary bassist Ron Carter. This time out, Pelt brings along a slightly less-high-profile, if no less talented, ensemble including pianist Victor Gould, bassist Vicente Archer, drummer Jonathan Barber, and percussionist Jacquelene Acevedo. Together, they take an intimate approach to expansive post-bop that straddles the line between Miles Davis' '60s albums and Terence Blanchard's early-'80s work. Pelt has a broad, enveloping trumpet tone and a knack for laying down highly engaging solos that never hold a listener at arm's length. It's a skill he puts to good use throughout Make Noise! and one complemented by his bandmates, especially pianist Gould, who layers these tracks with a sparkling delicacy reminiscent of the late Mulgrew Miller. Similarly, with Acevedo's kinetic percussion filtered throughout, Make Noise! also has a strong Afro-Latin influence, a vibe especially apparent on the roiling title track and frenetic, salsa-infused "Bodega Social." Equally compelling, "Chateau d'Eau" has a languid, R&B-inflected melody set to a midtempo Afro-Latin groove. Elsewhere, Pelt pushes toward harmonically nuanced modalism, offering a fittingly elegiac and noir-ish tribute to the departed pop icon on "Prince," and evincing the angular, classically influenced style of Black Codes-era Wynton Marsalis on "Cry Freedom." While much of Pelt's work fits nicely into the jazz canon, he clearly has an open ear for melody, a gift he exercises on "Your First Touch...", which sounds like a Leonard Cohen song reworked as a sensuous jazz ballad. Ultimately, Make Noise! continues to reveal Pelt's maturation into a confident artist, comfortable enough with his place in the jazz tradition to keep subtly pushing the edges of audience expectation. ~ Matt Collar
$7.49

Bebop - Released January 14, 2011 | HighNote Records

Jeremy Pelt's 2011 effort, The Talented Mr. Pelt, features the same working ensemble the trumpeter has used since 2007, which includes tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver. In many ways, the album is a similarly inclined mix of adventurous, on-the-edge, post-bop and modal jazz that featured on Pelt's stellar 2010 album, Men of Honor. A forward-thinking improviser with an ear for late-'60s Miles Davis and '70s Woody Shaw, Pelt pushes the brass envelope as much as possible and can engage a listener quite well on record. In that sense, you never get a canned or predictable moment on The Talented Mr. Pelt. Tracks like the funky, off-kilter waltz "Paradise Lost" and the forceful, rough-around-the-edges "Pulse" are terrific modern jazz numbers that bring to mind both the dreamy compositions of saxophonist Wayne Shorter and the early, firebrand work of trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. Similarly, the gorgeous later-album ballad "Only" and the driving, eyes-toward-the-horizon closer "David and Goliath," while coming at group interplay from different emotional directions, find Pelt and his ensemble working as a cohesive unit of like-minded individuals who truly seem to dig playing with each other. Of all of Pelt's prodigious talents showcased on The Talented Mr. Pelt, clearly the ability to pick musically sympathetic and daring sidemen makes the album a joy to hear. ~ Matt Collar
$7.49

Bebop - Released January 31, 2012 | HighNote Records

On Soul, trumpeter and composer Jeremy Pelt's third offering for High Note, his stellar quintet with saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver is intact, having been together for nearly six years. That said, where his first two offerings for the label were exceptional exercises in on-the-edge post-bop and modal jazz, Soul looks all the way back to 2003's Close to My Heart for comparison -- one that reveals just how far Pelt has come as a composer, a soloist, and an arranger. Soul is a collection of (mostly) blues and ballads. He wrote all but two of the album's eight tunes: the Sammy Cahn standard "Moondrift" (on which the band is fronted by vocalist Joanna Pascale) and a lively reading of George Cables' "Sweet Rita Suite, Pt. 2: Her Soul." Pelt and his band recorded this set in a single day, and had nuanced it all live before hitting the studio. On display here are intimacy, nuance, elegance, and an adventurous communication that is nearly symbiotic -- traits not normally associated with ballads or blues (these days, anyway). The frontline of Pelt and Allen is in perfect sync throughout, whether the two are playing counterpoint ("The Ballad of Ichabod Crane") or in unison ("The Story"). The exchange between ballads and blues is fluid. The former is an example of both existing side by side because of Pelt's structural harmonic development and Grissett's confident pianism. On "The Tempest," Burno and Cleaver push Grissett, who responds with flurries of notes and then the horns. The rhythm section's freedom is balanced by the horn solos and brief, contrapuntal head. On "Moondrift," Pascale is able to extract from her delivery every unnecessary utterance; Pelt is known for his sharp sense of economy, and Pascale rises to the challenge with a lovely, disciplined vibrato that allows the band to create shades of meaning behind her. The set's longest tune, "What's Wrong Is Right," commences with a slightly dissonant, Monk-esque harmonic statement and features excellent solos from Pelt, Grissett, and Allen; Burno and Cleaver drive them relentlessly, all the while swinging like mad. Soul is another high-water mark for Pelt and company, and an exercise in taking the tradition and giving it a thoroughly modern twist without sacrificing its heart. ~ Thom Jurek
$10.99
$7.49

Bebop - Released January 15, 2016 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
$7.49

Bebop - Released January 20, 2015 | HighNote Records

Jeremy Pelt's 12th studio album, 2015's Tales, Musings and Other Reveries, finds the trumpeter continuing on his trajectory of making swaggering yet artful and introspective post-bop. The album follows up his equally compelling releases, 2013's Water and Earth and 2014's Face Forward, Jeremy. As with those albums, Pelt succeeds here in combining all of his disparate stylistic inspirations -- from swinging, straight-ahead jazz to expansive modalism to soulful fusion -- into one cohesive sound that is never anything but organic. Even his bold choice of using two drummers here, Billy Drummond (heard in the right channel) and Victor Lewis (heard in the left), never gets in the way of creating utterly lithe, buoyant, and often gorgeous music. Also joining Pelt here are pianist Simona Premazzi and maverick, genre-defying bassist Ben Allison, who add their own forward-thinking touches to Pelt's sophisticated compositions. ~ Matt Collar
$7.49

Bebop - Released January 26, 2010 | HighNote Records

$7.99

Bebop - Released January 29, 2013 | HighNote Records

On 2012's outstanding Soul, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt showcased the fruit of his ensemble's six-plus years working together, gelling into a seamlessly cohesive, intuitive unit who knew how to push one another in the studio as well as on the bandstand. But all things change. On Water and Earth, Pelt's fourth date on HighNote, he showcases an entirely different band, playing a very different music. The lineup features seasoned veterans including bassist Burniss Earl Travis and percussionist Jeffrey Haynes, alongside somewhat younger players such as pianist David Bryant, saxophonist Roxy Cross, and drummer Dana Hawkins. The music on Water and Earth is a study in contrasts, using post-bop and circular rhythms together, adding in electric elements and more open spaces. Opener "Reimagine the World" is a laid-back, shuffling groove fueled mainly by Pelt's limpid horn and Bryant's tight chord voicings, before Angela Roberts and Fabiana Masili add their chorus of wordless voices which surprise near the exit. "Mystique" is a loosely composed melody offered by Cross' soprano atop Hawkins and Haynes before being joined by Travis, Bryant's Rhodes, and Pelt pushing over the top. The intro to "Boom Bishop" is all percussive fire with an incendiary, furious head shared by Pelt and Cross" tenor. She solos first, double-timed by Hawkins and Haynes offering a fluid series of breaks and driving accents. Pelt follows using a wah-wah pedal in his own solo. Bryant's punchy Rhodes and Travis' acoustic and electric bass set up a circular rhythmic interplay that locks the tune in. Other than on the lovely, straight-ahead ballad "Meditations on a Conversation We Had," Pelt uses effects on all following tracks. His attempt at a spacy R&B on "Stay," with Ra-Ra Valverde on vocals, simply doesn't work. "Pieces of a Dream" is a knottier post-bop tune, albeit one played with electric instruments, and it features excellent solo work by Bryant. In addition, the interplay between Travis, Hawkins, and Haynes is killer. The closer "Butterfly Dreams" is a floating ballad and among the most beautiful tunes on the set, with lovely restrained work from Pelt and Bryant, as well as gorgeous layers of brushed cymbals. On Water and Earth, the trumpeter is surely reaching for something new. At its best it is compelling, noteworthy; elsewhere, his search proves mercurial and elusive. ~ Thom Jurek
$7.99

Bebop - Released January 21, 2014 | HighNote Records

Beginning with 2005's Identity, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt began exploring '70s and '80s funk and fusion sounds inspired by the works of such luminaries as Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis. He continued these funk and electronic explorations on such albums as 2007's Shock Value: Live at Smoke and 2013's Water and Earth. While Pelt has also split his time playing and recording more straight-ahead post-bop albums, his 2014 album, Face Forward, Jeremy, combines the best of his acoustic recordings with the electronic-jazz hybrid sound of Water and Earth. Here, Pelt is joined by his longtime ensemble featuring pianist/keyboardist David Bryant, saxophonist Roxy Coss, bassist Chris Smith, and drummer Dana Hawkins. Also featured are vocalists Fabiana Masili and Milton Suggs, along with Rhodes keyboardist Frank LoCrasto and a handful of string players. This is a languid, atmospheric album that touches upon impressionistic, modal post-bop, soulful contemporary R&B, and groove-oriented '70s-style fusion. Tracks like "Princess Charlie" hang on a wordless vocal melody from Masili (mirrored by Pelt and Coss) that leads into adventurous improvisations from Pelt, Coss, and Bryant. "Rastros," once again showcasing Masili, is an Asian and Brazilian-inflected ballad punctuated by delicate harp lines, with Pelt on a beautiful, muted solo. Elsewhere, cuts like "Stars Are Free" sound like something along the lines of '70s Miles Davis, and "The Secret Code" features a frenetic jungle/drum'n'bass-influenced intro from Hawkins. Ultimately, Pelt's Face Forward, Jeremy is a high-minded, well-crafted mix of cutting-edge acoustic and electric jazz that gently turns your ears toward the future of jazz, while never asking you to let go of the music's past. ~ Matt Collar