Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Pop - Released April 16, 2012 | Atlantic Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released August 10, 2018 | Atlantic Records

Hi-Res
Following a four-year-long hiatus, Jason Mraz presents his sixth album. Know remains faithful to the modern and sunny pop folk he’s been known for since his early days. However, this opus is by far his most sincere. After discovering Buddhism in Myanmar, many things have resounded in the mind of the two-time Grammy Award winning singer. Sharing, giving and many other positive thoughts: a myriad of wholesome vibes have influenced Mraz’s creativity. Supported by David Hodges and other long-time collaborators, this new project ventures in an enticing pop direction. A romantic duo with Meghan Trainor on More Than Friends, a dreamy folk ballad with Sleeping to Dream, sensational and catchy pop with Have It All or dancing and rhythmic pop on Might As Well Dance: Mraz is all the rage once again. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Pop - Released June 19, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released July 11, 2014 | Atlantic Records - ATG

Hi-Res
CD$15.49

Pop - Released May 12, 2008 | Atlantic Records - ATG

Obsessed with carnality as he is, it was only a matter of time before Jason Mraz realized that it's better to sound sexy than to blather about it incessantly. This monumental moment arrives on his third album, We Sing, We Dance, We Steal Things, easily his sleekest collection of sounds and his only album to contain a suggestion of seduction within its grooves. Actually, We Sing is Mraz's only album to actually groove, as he sets down his acoustic guitar for much of the album and rides along on smooth rhythms partially indebted to '80s blue-eyed soul by Hall & Oates and Steve Winwood -- in that sense, the album recalls John Mayer's Continuum -- but he relies more heavily on Thriller, mixing it up with some modern neo-soul that gives this a surprisingly soulful sound. Mraz can glide on these surfaces, leaning on the gentle art of insinuation instead of goosing his paramour, but old habits die hard: it's only a matter of time before he punctures the seduction by scatting sophomorically, slipping in juvenile come-ons ("You make my slacks tight"), or stuttering manic syncopations on "The Dynamo of Volition." Mraz is also prone to terminal cuteness, drafting in a kids chorus to close out the coda of "Coyotes" and mewling out phrases like "always a goody doer," and while these are often so close-miked and forthright they're hard to ignore, they're also just not as prevalent as they were on the icky Mr. A-Z. Also, they're cleverly camouflaged beneath that gossamer gloss, typified by the quite catchy "Butterfly," whose Quincy Jones-styled horns disguise his mildly queasy oral sex puns. Mraz's lyrics don't stand up to such close scrutiny -- something the McCartney-esque, perhaps autobiographical divorce ballad "Love for a Child" ("Was it my mom who put dad out on his ass/Or the other way around") makes plain -- but the nice thing about the soulful shimmer of We Sing is that it's so slick that it's easy to ignore the gibberish spilling out of Mraz's mouth and just enjoy the sunny, easy sound. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released July 26, 2005 | Atlantic Records - ATG

In case you didn't catch the pun in the title of Jason Mraz's sophomore album, Mr. A-Z, the perpetually sophomoric singer/songwriter repeats it in the chorus of "Wordplay," the first single from this follow-up to his hit 2002 debut, Waiting for My Rocket to Come. It's a play on his last name, which is appropriate, because Jason Mraz is primarily concerned with two things: himself and sex. But even when he's talking about the latter, he fits the former into the equation -- "I've been working on getting you off, so get on board," for instance -- because he does consider himself to be quite a compelling presence. After all, he's "been a new sensation," as he declares on "Wordplay," which is likely the first single to ever be about an artist planning to beat the sophomore slump by having a hit with the very tune you're currently hearing. In this song, Mr. A-Z himself claims that "it's all about the wordplay" because "I am the wizard of oohs." Now if Mr. Wizard was really all about the wordplay -- that is, all about rhyming games and clever juxtapositions -- he would realize that his self-anointed title doesn't sound like "The Wizard of Oz" (and no amount of musical quotations from the film's theme song will change that), it sounds like he's the "wizard of ooze." That's a far cry from "Till I step on the brakes to get out of her clutches," to randomly pick an example from Elvis Costello, a songwriter who truly does relish playing with words (and was more of an outsider than this self-proclaimed "geek"), but his awkward wordplay does fit, because Mraz does come across like the Wizard of Ooze. Even when he's trying to be romantic he inadvertently gets sleazy, whether it's on the mock-operatic crooning that closes "Mr. Curiosity" or how "damn" is softly cooed in the chorus of the absurd "Plane," where he takes consolation that even if his flight crashes, he'll at least be able to see his lover's house from here. Not exactly romantic mood music, but Mraz prefers matters of the flesh anyway, rapidly spitting out lyrics about hooking up, such as "I can taste you all over my face," that make Dave Matthews' "hike up your skirt a little more" seem classy. Of course, Mraz's loose-limbed, litely funky, litely jazzy pop recalls Matthews and all of the post-Aware Records singer/songwriters who followed in his wake, but Mraz stands apart from the pack in how he's absolutely smitten with his ability to make words come out of his mouth. He loves to have his words spiral up and down on a cascade of moon/June/spoon rhymes and repetition. He loves to have them spill out uncontrollably, cramming as many words into a phrase as possible, unless he's diving for that dirty joke, as he does on "Geek in the Pink" (which has a bad single entendre title in the first place), when he stretches out "I can save you from unoriginal dum-dums/Who would care if you come...plete him or not" -- a move that isn't nearly as funny as Tim Curry's Frank N Furter's prolonged delivery of "anticipation" in "Sweet Transvestite," and not delivered with nearly as much lip-smacking zeal, either. That's because Mraz, ironically enough for a guy who specializes in music designed for college parties, doesn't have much of an inclusive vibe to his music; he's so into himself and what he can do that he doesn't bother to invite anybody else along for the ride. All of these traits were apparent on Waiting for My Rocket to Come, but with a little success underneath his belt, Mraz is content to indulge himself to his heart's content on Mr. A-Z, constructing songs that ride a groove with the sole purpose of giving himself a place to sing and kind of rap about the glories of himself, or to make juvenile jokes. For those who enjoyed the wise-ass undercurrent of his debut, this will be a delight. For those who enjoyed "The Remedy (I Won't Worry)," there will be too much narcissistic tomfoolery here to make this enjoyable. For those who never understood the appeal of Jason Mraz in the first place, Mr. A-Z will make them realize that they've really been taking John Mayer for granted. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$14.49

Pop - Released June 19, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Jason Mraz gives away the game for his seventh album with its title, Look for the Good. On every one of the record's 12 tracks, he's on a quest for positivity, a search that's scored to a sunsplash reggae lilt. Working with producer Michael Goldwasser, the founder of the reggae imprint Easy Star Records and a producer/musician in his own right, Mraz is supported by an empathetic crew of studio pros who help him add shade and texture to his anthems of love and good vibe. The album is loosely structured into a side of socially minded tunes and a side of party tunes and ditties about love, but you'd be forgiven if you thought that all the songs were about celebrating good thoughts and chill, since that's the vibe that's sustained throughout the record. Mraz's heart is in the right place and he can convey a palpable sense of warmth, but over the course of a full album, his relentless positivity can seem cloying. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Pop - Released April 17, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Download not available
CD$38.49

Pop - Released August 25, 2014 | Atlantic Records - ATG

CD$15.49

Pop - Released November 6, 2009 | Atlantic Records

Booklet
The title of Jason Mraz's Beautiful Mess: Live on Earth is unnecessarily complicated, but this CD/DVD set -- the concert runs two songs longer on the DVD -- is pretty simple, capturing a show Mraz gave at the Charter One Pavilion in Chicago in August 2009. Colbie Caillat shows up to duet on "Lucky," but that's really the only surprise here: Mraz is in total crowd-pleaser mode, running through hits and favorites, bending arrangements and improvising a little bit, but not enough to alter the feel or familiarity of the songs, creating a show that's a good time for fans, which is all that this needed to be, anyway. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$44.99

Pop - Released August 25, 2014 | Atlantic Records - ATG

CD$14.49

Pop - Released April 13, 2012 | Atlantic Records

CD$12.99

Pop - Released August 10, 2018 | Atlantic Records

Somewhere along the way, Jason Mraz decided his specialty was romance. This isn't quite the same thing as having his specialty be love songs, mind you. Mraz wrote and sang his fair share of love songs, but as he gradually muted his cleverness -- and hired Raining Jane, a group that was in his orbit since 2007, as his permanent backing band -- he let sweetness permeate his music, beginning with 2014's Yes! Delivered four years later, Know. is a mellow ray of sunshine like its predecessor. If anything, it's even lighter and sweeter, with Mraz burying his affection for corny rhymes ("Unlonely") and dirty puns ("Might as Well Dance") underneath layers of beachy vibes and sing-along melodies. Know.'s 36 minutes move swiftly and agreeably, partially because Mraz is now a seasoned pro. He knows not to lean too hard into either the jokes or sweet nothings, he knows that his easy-rolling tunes are best delivered with a slight reggae sway or maybe a little funk, so he crafted a record that is light and lithe -- a record that could serve as a soundtrack to either a romantic weekend or weekday drudgery, where it would brighten the mood on either occasion. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released October 15, 2002 | Elektra Records

Jason Mraz's Waiting for My Rocket to Come is a two-part invention. The first level is that of a young, almost compelling, singer/songwriter. Mraz has a nice voice, perhaps a little too articulated at times, which manages to mostly avoid the histrionic despite a predilection towards show tuney melodic turns. His voice tumbles out on top of folk-reggae rhythms that will probably sound a bit dated with time, but his vocals are filled with enough internal rhythms and rhymes to keep them interesting. Lyrically, Mraz relies on cliché to a certain degree, but does so with an earnestness that allows for believability and an eye for imagery that succeeds often enough to suggest that he knows what he's doing. The second level of Waiting for My Rocket to Come is the production of John Alagía, whose work has enhanced other similar folk-pop fair, including the Dave Matthews Band and O.A.R. His work with Mraz is, at its best, transparent, filling out the songs with subtle and glossy production and instrumentation. Reflections of banjos, organs, mellotrons, lap steels, ukuleles, and others peak out through the shine of the tunes, creating an impact too rich to be written off as lite. © Jesse Jarnow /TiVo
CD$1.49

Pop - Released January 3, 2012 | Atlantic Records

CD$24.49

Pop - Released May 13, 2008 | Atlantic Records - ATG

Obsessed with carnality as he is, it was only a matter of time before Jason Mraz realized that it's better to sound sexy than to blather about it incessantly. This monumental moment arrives on his third album, We Sing, We Dance, We Steal Things, easily his sleekest collection of sounds and his only album to contain a suggestion of seduction within its grooves. Actually, We Sing is Mraz's only album to actually groove, as he sets down his acoustic guitar for much of the album and rides along on smooth rhythms partially indebted to '80s blue-eyed soul by Hall & Oates and Steve Winwood -- in that sense, the album recalls John Mayer's Continuum -- but he relies more heavily on Thriller, mixing it up with some modern neo-soul that gives this a surprisingly soulful sound. Mraz can glide on these surfaces, leaning on the gentle art of insinuation instead of goosing his paramour, but old habits die hard: it's only a matter of time before he punctures the seduction by scatting sophomorically, slipping in juvenile come-ons ("You make my slacks tight"), or stuttering manic syncopations on "The Dynamo of Volition." Mraz is also prone to terminal cuteness, drafting in a kids chorus to close out the coda of "Coyotes" and mewling out phrases like "always a goody doer," and while these are often so close-miked and forthright they're hard to ignore, they're also just not as prevalent as they were on the icky Mr. A-Z. Also, they're cleverly camouflaged beneath that gossamer gloss, typified by the quite catchy "Butterfly," whose Quincy Jones-styled horns disguise his mildly queasy oral sex puns. Mraz's lyrics don't stand up to such close scrutiny -- something the McCartney-esque, perhaps autobiographical divorce ballad "Love for a Child" ("Was it my mom who put dad out on his ass/Or the other way around") makes plain -- but the nice thing about the soulful shimmer of We Sing is that it's so slick that it's easy to ignore the gibberish spilling out of Mraz's mouth and just enjoy the sunny, easy sound. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$1.49

Pop - Released April 27, 2018 | Atlantic Records

CD$12.99

Pop - Released August 24, 2004 | Elektra Records

Jason Mraz made quite an impression in 2003 -- the anti-John Mayer even as he was his peer. Mraz built a nationwide coffeehouse on the strength of singles like "The Remedy (I Won't Worry)" and "You and I Both," and those tracks anchor this pleasant live set. Tonight, Not Again finds Mraz to be an engaging performer, able to flutter his voice up and down through registers with incredible ease. He's performing music tailor-made for the Aware Records crowd -- Midwestern college students, open-mike hosts, and guys with beards. Mraz's twittering following eats up every morsel of Tonight, from the soft tones of the title track opener through the drifting "Sleeping to Dream" (his own "Wonderland") and the rousing, smartly lyrical "Too Much Food." Mraz is also shown to have a classic rock flair in his songwriting. "Absolutely Zero" references Pink Floyd's "Us and Them," "Common Pleasure" and "Curbside Prophet" stretch into scat and percussion-filled jams, and he does a nice cover of Elton John's "Rocket Man." John Popper guests, the horn section is a nice touch, and pretty soon Tonight, Not Again becomes a fan-friendly breeze. [Some editions of Tonight, Not Again included a DVD portion with behind-the-scenes footage.] © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
CD$16.49

Pop - Released February 13, 2007 | Atlantic Records - ATG

CD$12.99

Pop - Released July 14, 2014 | Atlantic Records - ATG

The exclamation point that punctuates its title suggests Jason Mraz may be a little enthusiastic on Yes! but that's a feint, hiding how this 2014 record is the next logical step on the singer/songwriter's road of seduction. Gone is the celebrated wordplay, a self-conscious maturation that was perhaps inevitable, but also absent are the smooth soul flourishes of 2012's Love Is a Four Letter Word. Those slow grooves underscored how Mraz embraced his role as a middlebrow make-out king in the wake of the success of "I'm Yours," but Yes! feels like a truer follow-up to that 2009 hit than the 2012 LP because it emphasizes Jason Mraz the sensitive singer/songwriter with an acoustic guitar slung across his shoulders. He flirts with rhythms floating up from the Caribbean, he covers Boyz II Men's "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday," he cops a bit of the Lumineers' big-beat folk stomp, and he strums a ukulele -- but these are all mild, complementary accents to a sun-kissed collection of romantic songs. Mraz doesn't avoid amorous clichés so much as he shamelessly embraces each and every one, addressing songs to a lover who is also his best friend and a "beautiful thing," celebrating long drives and quiet times with the one he loves. Such subjects are a clear indication that Yes! is not a record fueled by the heady rush of love at first sight; it's an album designed to soundtrack a long getaway weekend for a couple already in love. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Artist

Jason Mraz in the magazine