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Country - Released April 13, 2018 | Broken Bow Records

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In many respects, Rearview Town is simply another sturdy Jason Aldean album -- "High Noon Neon," its meditative closer, could bleed into "Lights Come On," the opener from 2016's They Don't Know, and nobody could tell a different album had started -- but in subtle ways, the record reveals a singer who is beginning to feel out his middle age. None of this is related to the October 2017 tragedy in Las Vegas, where Aldean was on-stage when a shooter fired into a crowd during the Route 91 Harvest Festival, as Rearview Town was basically completed at that point. Instead, the album -- his eighth -- finds the singer taking a side glance at middle age and deciding it might not be a bad place to be after all. While he won't hesitate to raise a few and "Set It Off," he's no longer leaning into hell-raising anthems. Aldean pivots off his facility with romantic slow-burners to create songs where he takes a long look at where he's at, concluding he's "Better at Being Who I Am." Make no mistake, a good portion of Rearview Town is designed to soundtrack a party -- he even raps on "Gettin' Warmed Up" -- but, more than ever, Aldean is persuasive when he's softer and, despite the modern electronic glint of the production, he also sounds better when things aren't quite so steely. Along with that reflective "Better at Being Who I Am," he lays into the classic soul trappings of "You Make It Easy" without a hitch, suggesting that Rearview Town may one day be seen as something more than another reliable Aldean album. Instead, it could wind up being the first chapter of his second act. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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9

Country - Released November 22, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released October 7, 2014 | Broken Bow Records

It's hard not to ascribe some meaning to the title of Old Boots, New Dirt, Jason Aldean's sixth album. Edging into his second decade as a star, Aldean's boots are getting a bit worn; he's no longer an upstart, he's a veteran who could almost be seen as an institution thanks to his long commercial track record. Stars have less reason to take risks -- why upset the apple cart if it's still generating revenue -- but there's some freshness on Old Boots, New Dirt, which means the second half of the title isn't just talk. Aldean and producer Michael Knox, who has been with him since the beginning, accentuate the singer's arena country with some decidedly modern electronics: splurting synths propel "Sweet Little Somethin'," while the slinky "Burnin' It Down" simmers to a skittering rhythmic loop. Usually, such electronic digressions indicate a bolder, even stylish, change in direction but that's hardly the case here. Despite the occasional four-on-the-floor pounder -- "Sweet Little Somethin'," "I Took It with Me," "Gonna Know We Were Here" with its gangly Keith Richards chords, all seemingly deliberately scattered through the record so it doesn't drag -- Old Boots, New Dirt is all ballads, slow burners, and midtempo anthems existing in a land that's a far cry from either "Hicktown" or "Crazy Town." Truth is, beneath that exaggerated swagger -- a macho strut he was always eager to emphasize -- Aldean's strength has been slower songs, whether it's the romantic "Why" or the mildly goofy "Big Green Tractor." He leans toward the romantic on Old Boots, New Dirt and he actually benefits from the extra layer of gloss Knox layers upon the album; even when he croons, Aldean retains a slight nasal edge in his voice and the electronics complement this characteristic well. This delicate balance is the greatest indication that both singer and producer are now old pros, knowing how to slyly underscore his star appeal, knowing that Aldean doesn't need to chase the sunny good times of bro-country. This casual, almost steely, assurance is appealing and even if the record goes on far too long at 15 tracks (18 in editions exclusive to certain retailers), this focus coalesces Old Boots, New Dirt, turning it into one of his best records. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released November 2, 2010 | Broken Bow Records

Jason Aldean isn’t a country music traditionalist -- unless one counts the pop- and rock-edged new country that emerged in the 1990s as a tradition, and since it’s cruising well into a second decade as the dominant music on country radio stations, perhaps it is a tradition by now. Aldean loves electric guitars, and there’s more Eagles and even AC/DC in his sound than there is George Jones, which, again, given the state of country music in the 21st century, hardly makes him a maverick. He’s not a strong singer, although he gets things done well enough, and he isn’t a songwriter, either, but since the commercial success of 2009’s Wide Open, which yielded three hit singles ("She's Country," "Big Green Tractor," and "The Truth"), he got his pick of the best songs from Nashville’s veteran writers for his new album. Produced by Michael Knox , My Kinda Party has an impressive sonic consistency, full of churning and chiming electric guitars (provided by guitarists Kurt Allison and Adam Shoenfeld -- Aldean uses his touring band in the studio) wrapped around big songs with small-town themes. At best, this formula produces energetic tracks like the wonderful opener, “Tattoos on This Town”; the small-town Saturday night anthem “My Kinda Party” (the lead single from the album); and the air-guitar epic “Days Like These,” which closes this set out. Aldean even tackles a straight ballad like “The Heartache That Don’t Stop Hurting” with enough sincerity and style to make it work. Again, there are layers of electric guitars everywhere, and truthfully, Aldean has found success because he finds songs that fit his voice and then lets the guitars do what they do. He does just enough, and doesn’t reach for the stars -- it’s a formula that should keep on working into the near future. ~ Steve Leggett
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9

Country - Released November 22, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Upon its release in the waning months of 2019, Jason Aldean claimed he always wanted to call his ninth album 9. It was his lucky number, the number he had when he played baseball as a kid, so he planned to use the numeral as a title if he ever had a chance. As it happens, he did in 2019, when he made his ninth album for Broken Bow. Like its eight predecessors, 9 is produced by Michael Knox, and like every album since 2014's Old Boots, New Dirt, 9 relies on a sleek blend of gleaming electronic rhythms, slow-burning ballads, minor-key melodies, and country songs. A half-decade prior, this hybrid seemed fresh, but repetition has dulled its luster, an impression not lessened by the album's long running time. Over the course of nearly an hour, Aldean runs through songs of heartbreak and small towns, occasionally lightening the mood as the amplifiers get cranked up and his delivery gets quicker. None of these sounds are new and Aldean and Knox don't take any pains to offer much of a new spin on either the feel or content of the tracks, either: it's simply another collection of Aldean songs. That it's executed well is expected, possibly welcome, but the professionalism also has a bit of a dulling effect, sanding away any sense of personality, an end result that's slightly ironic because there's no mistaking 9 for the work of anybody else. Its cool, reserved, dour vibe is purely Aldean. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 16, 2012 | Broken Bow Records

Jason Aldean makes albums the old-fashioned way -- the way they did back in 1994, just after the great Garth explosion. Aldean romanticizes "1994," in fact, sending up a jumping salute to the nearly forgotten neo-traditionalist Joe Diffie -- whose name bafflingly provides the chorus chant on "1994" -- and more importantly crafting his fifth album, Night Train, like they did in the '90s: it's bigger and bolder, impressed with its own ballast and weight. Aldean rocks the country, not with rhythm but with volume, ensuring that his pulsating party anthems and power ballads are delivered with a dogged force, with any subtleties or ambiguities flattened by his sheer sinewy determination. And that relentless, grim persistence defines Night Train, an album with plenty of songs about partying, open roads, endless tours, and strippers, with not a one sounding like much fun. Much of this is due to Aldean's reliance on minor keys and slow, steady marches -- neither attribute delivers much sense of excitement -- but his affectless singing doesn't help either, as he seems as nonplussed by the good times as he is by the sweet sentiments in the love songs. He's the steady inscrutable center on the slightly overblown Night Train, an album where every cut is louder than the next and, at 15 tracks, there are lots of tunes, reminiscent of nothing more than a packed-to-the-gills superstar CD from back in 1994. Certainly, Night Train is huge, but its size feels derived by divine proclamation: it is big simply because it was intended to be big but at its core it feels weary, a little hollow, and not at all fun. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released April 7, 2009 | Broken Bow Records

Jason Aldean quietly turned into a genuine country star in the back half of the 2000s -- not the kind who has pop hits, but the kind who steadily reaches the country Top Ten, primed for a crossover hit. Wide Open, his third album, might take him there, since he manages to hit every contemporary cliché in the book without seeming too systematic about it. That light touch takes Aldean a long way, as it never appears that he's pandering even though he kind of is, making sure that he has songs about small-town girls with big-city dreams, paeans to Nashville, mournful laments about his rowdy ways, a tune about his big green tractor, and love songs to the country and girls from the country. Aldean puts a lot of rock in his country, particularly on the stuttering AC/DC riff that powers "She's Country," which is a bit of compensation for the plainness of his voice, but his simple, affectless singing does disguise just how shopworn his songs are. He doesn't necessarily turn the familiar into something fresh, but his keen, plainspoken voice does ground Wide Open, making ballads feel intimate and party anthems not too rowdy. It's nothing too risky, nothing too soft, just a straight shot down the middle of the road -- a road that runs through a subdivision that only becomes memorable through repetition. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released April 13, 2018 | Broken Bow Records

Booklet
In many respects, Rearview Town is simply another sturdy Jason Aldean album -- "High Noon Neon," its meditative closer, could bleed into "Lights Come On," the opener from 2016's They Don't Know, and nobody could tell a different album had started -- but in subtle ways, the record reveals a singer who is beginning to feel out his middle age. None of this is related to the October 2017 tragedy in Las Vegas, where Aldean was on-stage when a shooter fired into a crowd during the Route 91 Harvest Festival, as Rearview Town was basically completed at that point. Instead, the album -- his eighth -- finds the singer taking a side glance at middle age and deciding it might not be a bad place to be after all. While he won't hesitate to raise a few and "Set It Off," he's no longer leaning into hell-raising anthems. Aldean pivots off his facility with romantic slow-burners to create songs where he takes a long look at where he's at, concluding he's "Better at Being Who I Am." Make no mistake, a good portion of Rearview Town is designed to soundtrack a party -- he even raps on "Gettin' Warmed Up" -- but, more than ever, Aldean is persuasive when he's softer and, despite the modern electronic glint of the production, he also sounds better when things aren't quite so steely. Along with that reflective "Better at Being Who I Am," he lays into the classic soul trappings of "You Make It Easy" without a hitch, suggesting that Rearview Town may one day be seen as something more than another reliable Aldean album. Instead, it could wind up being the first chapter of his second act. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released July 26, 2005 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2016 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released May 29, 2007 | Broken Bow Records

Hailing from Macon, GA, country-rocker Jason Aldean absorbed a variety of musical influences in his youth and he happily incorporates them into his unusually personal style -- one that eschews Hat Brigade purity in favor of a greasy, gritty sound that draws on influences from all around the South and maybe a few points north as well. Following on the heels of both his surprise win as the Academy of Country Music's Top Male Vocalist and gold sales of his debut album, Relentless finds Aldean messing around with his sound a bit: the guitars are heavy and aggressive, and where others might incorporate lonely pedal steel he has a tendency to bring in a raunchy electric bottleneck guitar; the big chorus on "Who's Kissing You Tonight" is all Nashville, but the chugging twin guitars on the album's title track are more in line with vintage .38 Special than anything you're likely to hear coming out of Music City. And if "My Memory Ain't What It Used to Be" never quite seems to get off the ground, the roaring "Johnny Cash" and the more subtly uplifting "No" both make up for it. And his duet with Miranda Lambert on "Grown Woman" is a slow-burning gem. (If you need more cowbell, consult the brilliantly rollicking "I Break Everything I Touch.") ~ Rick Anderson
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Country - Released October 7, 2014 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released October 11, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released July 26, 2005 | Broken Bow Records

Jason Aldean has been slugging it out as a professional singer since high school, and the confidence gleaned from years of experience shines though on his self-titled debut album, as he delivers a strong collection of blue collar-themed songs in a smooth, polished tenor. Lyrics about philosophical farmers ("Amarillo Sky"), small-town pride ("Hicktown"), and moments of spiritual insight ("Good to Go") are backed by twangy, honky tonk-ish Telecaster licks and rock-influenced country rhythms of the Alabama/Sawyer Brown variety. "Asphalt Cowboy" is a contemporary update of classic 1970s lonesome-trucker songs (complete with weeping steel guitar), while "You're The Love I Wanna Be In" borrows licks from 1980's AOR power pop of the .38 Special/Rick Springfield mold. Chock full of variety and energetic performances, JASON ALDEAN is a great introduction to a promising talent.
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Country - Released January 26, 2018 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2019 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released June 9, 2011 | Broken Bow Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2019 | Broken Bow Records