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Film Soundtracks - Released March 23, 2012 | Masterworks

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 18, 1997 | Sony Classical

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 10, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 16, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 10, 1995 | Epic Soundtrax

In writing for the silver screen, the successful composer must in some way evoke the director's vision of the story, the plot twists and the internal motivations that drive its characters and situations. Thus we have Bernhard Hermann's edgy, post-modern responses to Hitchcock's complex psychological situations, Nina Rota's puckish, circus-like counterpoint to Fellini's ambiguous allegories, and John Williams' sweeping, larger-than-life fanfares for the saturday afternoon escapades of George Lucas and Steven Speilberg's mythical heroes. There is something of a sepia tint to all Horner's music in LEGENDS OF THE FALL, as if one were leafing through the worn and crumbling pages of an ancient photo album, in search of roots and ancestors. But with the sweeping theme of "The Ludlows," Horner manages to suggest the family's origins in Cornwall, England through a folkish theme whose sing-singy contour must go back several centuries--thus setting the stage for a brooding tale of family conflict. "To The Boys," with the distant thunder of drums and the noble cry of brass manages to convey both the bond of fellowship and the gruesome sundering of sudden loss. "Alfred Moves To Helena" suggests the scope and breadth of life in post-Civil War Montana, even as "Farewell/Descent Into Madness" hints at the vastness and loneliness of the endless frontier. Especially moving are the passages of "Revenge," as past and present co-mingle in a surreal, dreamy blur of bass drums, metallic percussion, fiddle, shakuhachi and ominous siren cries. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 25, 1987 | Varese Sarabande

  
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 4, 1982 | Rhino Atlantic

Taking the musical reins from the legendary Jerry Goldsmith, James Horner boarded the Starship Enterprise to deliver what would prove to be his breakthrough score. A surprisingly dark, emotional effort some distance removed from Goldsmith's utopian fanfare, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan was instrumental in steering the franchise into more complex territory. Horner's lucid melodies and sweeping orchestral arrangements possess a sense of genuine danger and malice long absent from Star Trek's musical backdrop, climaxing in the profoundly emotional catharsis of "Spock." His efforts lend Trek creator Gene Roddenberry's vision a newfound gravitas. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 11, 2001 | E2E Classics

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 18, 2015 | BSX Records, Inc.

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1985 | Polydor

This James Horner score includes music ranging from ethereal to big band. One can't help but be touched by the plaintive oboe theme found throughout the album. It also includes "Gravity" by Michael Sembello. © Tavia Hobart /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Hollywood Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 28, 2021 | Hollywood Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 31, 1998 | Sony Classical

Titanic was a phenomenon in more ways than one. It was certainly unheard of for a film to break the billion-dollar barrier, but it was also unheard of for a largely instrumental soundtrack album to stay on top of the music charts for weeks on end. And it was James Horner's instrumentals that did it, too -- if it was just Celine Dion's single keeping it there, her own album would have fallen down the charts. So, Horner's Titanic was a blockbuster on par with the film, but there was one thing that distinguished it from James Cameron's movie -- there could be a sequel to the soundtrack. Both Sony Classical and Horner realized this simple fact, so they released Back to Titanic to coincide with the video release of Titanic in late summer 1998. Since much of his original score was on the original soundtrack, he had only a little bit of unreleased music for Back to Titanic. No problem -- fill out the rest of the album with Celtic music that served as inspiration for Horner and Cameron (Enya, however, is curiously absent), and add a new version of "My Heart Will Go On" that has film dialogue layered over the original recording, à la the popular radio-play version of Springsteen's Jerry Maguire love theme, "Secret Garden." The end result may be a little padded, but it's no less enjoyable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 5, 1999 | Sony Classical

The original soundtrack to Chris Columbus' Bicentennial Man reunites composer James Horner with singer Celine Dion, the dynamic duo that made the Titanic soundtrack a huge success. Horner's evocative score and Dion's single "Then You Look at Me" reflect the film's bittersweet tale of a robot's ambition to become human over the course of two centuries. Though it may not be as popular a soundtrack as Titanic, Bicentennial Man is a satisfying, appropriate album of film music. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 16, 1998 | Sony Classical

James Horner's score for James Cameron's epic romance Titanic is much like the film itself -- against all expectations, it delivers exactly what it promises. His score is grand, without falling into typical melodrama, and delicately romantic, without being sickly sentimental; it offers genuine emotion and excitement, with the haunting vocals of Norwegian singer Sissel providing a nice counterpoint to Horner's blend of strings, vocals, orchestras, and synthesizers. Celine Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" may feel a little like an afterthought, especially after experiencing Horner's wrenching, affecting score, but its heart is in the right place. Nevertheless, it is Horner's instrumental work and its whirlwind of emotions that makes the score of Titanic a voyage worth repeating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Classical - Released September 23, 2016 | Mercury Classics

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 29, 2012 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 20, 2006 | New Line Records

For Terrence Malick's THE NEW WORLD, veteran composer/conductor James Horner crafted a gorgeous score that perfectly echoes the renowned director's highly visual, atmospheric style of filmmaking. To accentuate Malick's love of natural beauty--revealed in lingering shots of wildlife and unspoiled landscapes--Horner utilizes subtly swelling horn lines, nuanced string passages, and even the delicate sounds of birdsong. Acclaimed singer Hayley Westenra provides vocals on a number of tracks, most notably the closing song "Listen to the Wind," which was written and produced by Horner and pop guru Glen Ballard. Aside from that final number, though, the soundtrack is predominantly understated, almost to the point of being ambient, marking it as a rarity in the often bombastic realm of Hollywood film scores. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 23, 2012 | Masterworks

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1986 | Geffen*

Universal Pictures' cartoon musical An American Tail was released just three years prior to the Disney cartoon renaissance led by the Alan Menken musicals The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast. Had it been released in that era, the film's money song, "Somewhere Out There," probably would have earned an Academy Award for Best Song. But in 1986, Academy voters were just as robotic in their selection of Top 40 hits as they would later be in their selection of cartoon production numbers. As it happened, "Somewhere Out There" lost the Oscar to the Top Gun song "Take My Breath Away," and Tail composer James Horner had to wait until Titanic in 1997 to win his first Oscar. An American Tail, produced by Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment, is on par with many of the more celebrated '90s cartoon musicals. Horner's lush and tuneful orchestrations often emulate Spielberg's favorite composer, John Williams. His songs, co-written with Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, pale slightly in comparison with the instrumental score. But they are charmingly performed by actors like Philip Glasser, Christopher Plummer and Dom DeLuise, and Weil's lyrics are quite clever, especially on "There Are No Cats in America" and "Never Say Never." The soundtrack also contains a beautiful choral setting of "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor" as well as the hit pop ballad version of "Somewhere Out There" performed by Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram. © Evan Cater /TiVo