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Mélodies (England) - Released January 25, 2019 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released February 2, 2010 | Meridian Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
This collection of post-Elizabethan melancholy risks being overly ambitious, for it tries to pursue two innovative goals. First, it mixes songs and poetry of the period; it is not the only recording to have done so, but it is likely to be the first one that attendees at the Stratford Festival, say, run across on the rack. Second, it tries to uncover some lesser-known songs: eight pieces on the disc are devoted to the comparatively little-known Robert Jones, along with works by Dowland and Robert Johnson and poetry by Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Thomas Campion, Sir Walter Raleigh, and others. Fortunately, it all hangs together beautifully. A good deal of the credit goes to the performer who will no doubt be the disc's strongest drawing card -- actor Ralph Fiennes, who reads the poetry in a direct, immensely appealing style. Sample his reading of Raleigh's love poem "In the grace of wit, of tongue, of face," track 9, and you may be instantly hooked on the disc. The two countertenors involved, England's James Bowman and Canada's Daniel Taylor, perform both together and singly on the disc. Both are supremely gifted interpreters of this material, with smooth voices that achieve startling intimacy and control in these small, sad songs. Their voices would seem to complement each other well, with Bowman's more plaintive sound set against the creamy surfaces of Taylor, but the duets do not work quite as well -- the two singers push and pull the tempos in ways that neither seems entirely at ease with. This may be a matter of subjective preference, however, and any general lover of the golden age of English music, poetry, and drama will profit from having this disc on the shelf and in the stereo or digital music player. © TiVo
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2007 | Analekta

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 7, 2006 | Meridian Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 1992 | Ricercar

Booklet
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released May 1, 2009 | Lyrita

Booklet
The inventiveness and originality of these works by John Tavener, written in the early '70s within five years of his breakthrough piece, The Whale, make this a release that should be of interest not only to followers of the composer, but even to fans of new vocal and choral music who aren't particularly taken with the austere "holy minimalism" that has characterized the composer's signature mature style. Tavener wrote Requiem for Father Mulcahy in memory of a priest who was especially fond of the admonition, "Keep the medieval spirit of Art alive," and the composer takes that advice to heart in these two works. Set for six male singers and chamber orchestra, the Requiem makes extensive use of plainchant, and while the piece is eclectic enough to include serial techniques and a higher level of dissonance than is usual for the composer, it does convey a kind of archaic sensibility. Its movements are strikingly varied, and the delicacy of the vocal writing and the scoring gives hints of the aesthetic that the composer would later more fully develop. The ending thins to a transparent, celestial texture of bells, piano, and voices, and is exceptionally lovely. Canciones españolas, settings, or treatments of Spanish folk songs, are even more overtly medieval in their sound. Scored for two high voices, three flutes, harpsichord, chamber organ, and percussion, the orchestration establishes a thoroughly pre-modern atmosphere, on which Tavener capitalizes by using a variety of medieval compositional forms and procedures, including organum and isometric motet, as well as popular dance and song. The composer conducts the Nash Ensemble in performances that emphasize the wild rusticity of the Canciones and the sophistication of the Requiem. Counter tenors Kevin Smith and James Bowman sing with pure tone and appropriate abandon in the Canciones, and the King's Singers bring warmth and polish to the Requiem. The sound is clear and clean, with nicely differentiated ambience for the two pieces: bright and open for the Canciones and resonant for the Requiem. © TiVo
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 24, 2014 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released June 30, 2009 | Musical Concepts

Originally recorded on a pair of LPs in 1976 and 1978, this collection of Dowland lute songs, along with works by his near contemporaries Thomas Campion (here given in the unusual "Campian" spelling), John Danyel (or Daniel), and Philip Rosseter, formed part of the second generation of countertenor recordings in the LP era. The instrument of countertenor James Bowman was durable enough to keep him active well into the next century, even as a greater variety of countertenor voices came on the scene, and this release may be regarded as a cornerstone of the library of countertenor recordings. It reflects its era in various ways. The program consists of an almost unbroken succession of songs, with just three solo lute pieces for contrast. And Bowman's voice has the rounded, Julia Child-a-couple-of-octaves-up quality favored by the early exponents of countertenor singing. This said, countertenors who have developed their own styles in the years since this recording appear to owe a great deal to this release and others like it. For sheer musicality Bowman has rarely been topped. No printed texts are provided in the booklet (which is in English only), but they're hardly needed, at least for anglophones; Bowman, unlike quite a few other countertenors, enunciates everything clearly and, although his style is on the dry, delicate side, seems to weigh the proper expression of every word he sings. Dowland's songs, which for the most part are quite intricate in their structure as compared with those by the other three composers, are intelligently shaped in their larger dimensions as well as their local syntax. The remastering has retained the clear, intimate sound of the original recording. In all this is another worthwhile reissue from the small Alto label of suburban New York City, which has unearthed many small treasures of the twentieth century's recorded legacy. The layout of the booklet is awkward, with a tracklist that begins on the back cover and continues on the previous inside page, but the sketch of Dowland's career is concise and appealing. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 5, 2007 | Meridian Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 1, 2014 | Convivium Records

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Classical - Released April 24, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released October 18, 2006 | Meridian Records