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$17.99

R&B - Released November 4, 2002 | Warner Bros.

Jaheim's considerable vocal talents only increased during the recording of his second album, and a stronger set of songs made Still Ghetto a definite improvement over the debut. As before, it all begins with his voice: a deep, throaty croon that makes him sound at least ten years older than he actually is (basically, about as old as the soul samples dotted throughout the record) and marks him as one of the few R&B artists active who can summon the spirit of a Teddy Pendergrass. Better yet, Jaheim takes the loverman persona to another level, devoting more songs here to relationships than love itself; one of the best is "Put That Woman First," his remake of the Stax nugget William Bell's "I Forgot to Be Your Lover," a great performance that's a natural fit with his persona. The single "Fabulous" is simply beautiful, balancing a back-in-the-day feel with self-esteem issues and riding out with a chorus of children's voices. For "Everywhere I Am," Jaheim recorded a postcard to his mother, who died before he gained fame; it's another testament to his power as an artist that Still Ghetto never descends into maudlin sentiments. Just like his soul forefathers, everything about Jaheim is honest and heartfelt. ~ John Bush
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R&B - Released March 13, 2001 | Warner Bros.

On his debut album Ghetto Love, soulful crooner Jaheim runs the gamut of a wide variety of R&B styles, showcasing himself as a multi-faceted artist. Despite the ghetto posturing, one listen to the album reveals the baritone-voiced singer to have more in common with the likes of Will Downing or even a more street version of Luther Vandross, with song styles reminiscent of Keith Sweat, especially with his ample use of female vocalists. The album is something of a musical journey. It begins with mid- to up-tempo material, from the '70s sounding "Let It Go" (complete with a horn section) to the album's smoldering first single, "Could It Be," arguably one of the best R&B songs in years. Other breezy tunes follow, such as "Happiness," the jeep-flavored "Lil Nigga Ain't Mine" (almost comically tacking an obviously sensitive issue), "Finders Keepers," and "Just In Case," which resonates as a perfect summer jam. The album is unfortunately weighted down by some unremarkable material, but thankfully is salvaged at its close, when Jaheim sings more traditional fare, allowing his gorgeous voice to truly shine. Most memorable among these tunes are "Love Is Still Here," which, unfortunately, is more of an interlude than anything else; "Ready, Willing & Able"; and the church-organ lullaby "For Moms." As a final and remarkable note, Jaheim never stoops to use foul language. The music is just as effective the way it is, without the need to degenerate itself with obscenities. Despite some dull moments, this is a first-rate debut from a very promising artist. ~ Jose F. Promis
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R&B - Released March 18, 2016 | BMG rights management

Jaheim's time with Atlantic was basically as productive as his earlier Warner Bros. phase. For both labels, he released three albums. All six went Top Ten R&B. Despite commercial radio's increased marginalization of soul-rooted R&B, not one of the releases contained a stylistic concession. Album seven, released on the singer's reactivated Julia's Dream label (named in honor of his mother) through Primary Wave/BMG Rights Management, adds to the uniform discography. Jaheim does switch it up by employing a mostly new set of producers and musicians for support, and they duly serve up a fresh-sounding mix of songs based in traditional R&B. On "Songs to Have Sex To," he acknowledges his inspirations more explicitly than before, citing "Teddy P., Luther V." first among a list of classic balladeers, like a less silly but still humorous update of Twista, Jamie Foxx, and Kanye West's "Slow Jams." The album also continues Jaheim's tradition of referencing classic R&B ballads. This time, it's the Deele's "Two Occasions," embellished with a generous rhythmic bump to complement a yearning (well, thirsting) vocal. As much as the pure sound of his voice remains roughly 65-percent Vandross, 35-percent Pendergrass, the singer's flow is still his own, as his ability to deliver an explicit line without the slightest smirk. The way he completes a couplet that begins with "Let's cuddle to a flick" confirms that there should be a term defined as "Rewinding a Jaheim recording to confirm what he sang, only to conclude 'Of course that's what Jaheim sang.'" Those who can't stomach the foolishness nonetheless get some prime ballads resulting in no split sides, including the sparkling "If Someone Asks" and the nearly rending likes of "Something Tells Me" and "Back in My Arms." ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released February 8, 2010 | Atlantic Records

Truth in advertising, Another Round varies little from Jaheim’s earlier efforts, but for the returning listener, that’s the selling point. Right off the bat the fingersnapping funk of “Ain’t Leavin’ Without You” brings that husky brand of neo-soul that’s unique to the singer, who’s partnered here with a handful like-minded producers including the returning KayGee. With warm guitars, jazzy flutes, and early-'70s soul nostalgia, the following “Finding My Way Back” is a perfect example of how the singer nails those Vandross-sized moments of yearning. The silky smooth “Her” gets at the cool passion of the Isley’s, and Bill Withers even comes to mind on some of the more organic cuts, but with such obvious respect for the past, the argument against interpolating Percy Sledge’s classic “When a Man Loves a Woman” for the trite “Impossible” should have been obvious. Still, at 14 cuts the album still stands after some trimming, and when you add big fan Jadakiss on the “Ain’t Leavin’ Without You” remix, you’ve got all the elements Jaheim fans require. ~ David Jeffries
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R&B - Released February 13, 2006 | Warner Bros.

Booklet
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R&B - Released November 4, 2002 | Warner Bros.

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R&B - Released September 3, 2013 | Atlantic Records

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R&B/Soul - Released January 6, 2006 | Warner Bros.

Jaheim's viewpoints on music haven't changed a bit since he debuted in 2000, and fans of intelligent R&B should be praising that fact. With a raft of excellent productions from KayGee (Naughty by Nature) and others, plus a focus on celebrating love and family with well-written songs, he's remained free to craft albums full of rich harmonies and his excellent vocals (he's one of the few modern vocalists who knows exactly how far he should go with melisma). Ghetto Classics may boast nothing as ambitious as 2002's "Fabulous" (a Top 20 hit and an artistic breakthrough, all in one), and it may amp up the rapper collaborations in search of hits (Jadakiss and Styles P have appearances), but overall very little distracts from the qualities that have made him the most durable talent in commercial yet traditional R&B music. Opener "The Chosen One" is an immediate standout, a bumping love song that finds Jaheim floating serenely over one of KayGee's best productions (based on Willie Hutch's "I Choose You"). He and Jadakiss trade off on the single "Everytime I Think About Her," and the combination of smooth and rough sounds perfect. The final three songs ditch the samples for straight R&B, and while the absence is missed, it represents an intriguing direction for Jaheim in the future. Classic R&B may seem like just a memory to some, but with artists like Heather Headley and Jaheim in action, it doesn't have to be about the past. ~ John Bush
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Dance - Released March 16, 2010 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released December 14, 2007 | Atlantic Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 24, 2008 | Warner Bros.

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R&B - Released February 13, 2006 | Warner Bros.

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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | BMG rights management

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R&B - Released June 23, 2015 | BMG rights management

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 24, 2008 | Warner Bros.

Here is a quick and dirty Jaheim anthology covering the singer's first three albums, all released on Warner Bros. -- Ghetto Love (2001), Still Ghetto (2002), and Ghetto Classics (2006). Released in time for the Christmas 2008 shopping season, it contains each one of Jaheim's charting singles from these releases, with the exception of "Backtight," plus "Looking for Love," a highlight from the debut that should have been a Top Ten R&B hit. With the albums destined to slide out of print, it wouldn't have hurt to throw on some more of the deeper cuts; the disc, after all, contains only nine songs and has the length (36 minutes) of a mid-line vinyl compilation. From a packaging standpoint, Jaheim deserved better. The typeface is a challenge to any set of eyes. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B/Soul - Released February 16, 2010 | Warner Bros.

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R&B - Released December 18, 2007 | Atlantic Records

Jaheim switches from Warner Bros. to Atlantic after 2006's number one Ghetto Classics, and it's business as usual for the singer. He continues to surround himself with a complementary roster of fellow songwriters and producers, including associates old (KayGee, Wesley Hogges, Darren Lighty, Eric Williams, Balewa Muhammad) and new (R. Kelly, Babyface, Ivan Barias, Carvin Haggins). Like an overwhelming percentage of Jaheim's first three albums, there's nothing flashy about The Makings of a Man. It's built-to-last R&B with a foot in the past and another in the present, his tough-yet-smooth Teddy Pendergrass-meets-Luther Vandross voice in full effect. Particularly bright spots include "Hush" (the R. Kelly collaboration, where Jaheim feels conflicted over sleeping with his best friend's woman), the Force M.D.'s-sampling "Have You Ever" (a frank check-yourself number, despite its wistfulness), and pretty much every other track that incorporates a soul classic, whether it's Bobby Womack's "If You Think You're Lonely Now" ("Lonely") or Atlantic Starr's "Let's Get Closer" ("I've Changed," featuring Keyshia Cole). ~ Andy Kellman
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Dance - Released July 12, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released September 6, 2005 | Warner Bros.

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R&B - Released January 3, 2006 | Warner Bros.