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Classical - Released June 27, 2014 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Audite

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Trios - Released July 21, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Alongside Milhaud’s impressive corpus of eighteen string quartets, the two string trios seem no more than occasional pleasure pieces. But even they are an authentic expression of his style, oscillating between rigour and playfulness. His Mediterranean heritage and character, however, did not close Milhaud’s mind to other, entirely different, influences; from South American folklore to North American jazz through to German music – yes, indeed! even though rejecting German music was, even before WWII, a cultural policy of the French avant-garde – German music, which manifested itself in his fondness for Bachian counterpoint. The String Trio from 1947 puts many facets of Milhaud in a nutshell : simutaneous tonalities, strict counterpoint to the brink of atonality, boisterous moments of near-popular style... The rather jolly Sonatine à trois was a memento of a journey that Milhaud made through the USA together with his wife and son. Milhaud’s path crossed several times with that of his contemporary Bohuslav Martinů, who for seventeen years lived in Paris in rather mediocre conditions, while Milhaud celebrated his greatest successes during the years between the wars; in 1940 both of them were forced to leave France for the USA, where they lived for several years. Whilst Milhaud only discovered the string trio genre in the USA, Martinů wrote his two trios while still in Paris studying with his teacher Albert Roussel. From Roussel, Martinů learned perfect formal proportions, rhythmic concision and a vivid, but not sentimental, sense of colour; his First String Trio of 1924, after but a few performances, was lost and then rediscovered in 2005 in Copenhagen. Martinů’s Second Trio of 1934, a compact and energetic work, was spared such a fate and soon became a favourite with chamber musicians. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 29, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released June 12, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released June 26, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released July 10, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released July 24, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet
The complete Mozart works for string trio in a new recording with the Jacques Thibaud String Trio: alongside the well-known Divertimento, K. 563. Chamber music of the highest order, features rich harmonies, elaborately crafted contrapuntal textures and great technical challenges. The Preludes and Fugues are unique documents of Mozart's study of Bach's oeuvre. They contain three fugues from The Well-Tempered Clavier, one fugue each from The Art of Fugue and an Organ Sonata, as well as one fugue by Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. Four of the Preludes are probably Mozart's own, whilst two are from Bach's Trio Sonatas for organ. Mozart produced his arrangements for private Sunday gatherings at the home of Baron van Swieten, where he would play the viola part. Mozart's study of the old masters would prove an important influence on his later compositions. The six-movement Divertimento, K. 563, of 1788 is considered as the string trio par excellence. It is chamber music of the highest order, with rich harmonies and elaborately crafted counterpoint. Here, Mozart makes greater technical demands on the performers than in his Violin Concertos or his Sinfonia concertante, K. 364, for violin, viola and orchestra. In his three-part writing, Mozart reaches astonishing depths, with double stops at times imitating the sound of a quartet. All three string instruments are treated completely equally, each in turn taking the lead; the viola and cello are given especially rewarding melodic lines. This magnificent work condenses the entire potential of string trio playing into a 50-minute late Mozartian experience. © Audite