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Classical - Released February 22, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Fazil Say is not merely a pianist. This phenomenal Turkish musician is also a hugely talented composer, combining traditional eastern Mediterranean music with jazz, a structural rigour worthy of Haydn or Mozart and an orchestration reminiscent of Stravinsky or Ravel, all the while ensuring that his music is wonderfully original. His repertoire comprises some seventy works, ranging from symphonies to pieces for solo piano, chamber music to concertos and film music to “classical” jazz. Among other things, this album features two world premieres: the colourful Grand Bazaar written for orchestra and first performed in 2015, and China Rhapsody written for piano and orchestra, which premiered in 2016. The two works show that Say is not afraid to branch out. In the first part of the program, we find “Concerto for Violin 1001 Nights in the Harem” from 2007, a work that glitters with the decorative Arab palaces, orchestral flourishes à la Ravel, and the sensual sweatiness from those thousand and one nights in question... Howard Griffith, a conductor who has worked with many of the main Turkish composers, is in his element here with the Austrian Radio Orchestra; for the concerto we find Iskandar Widjaja, the spectacular violinist of German and Indonesian origin, quite rightly considered a cross between a popstar and a high-flying international soloist - a worthy successor, say, to Nigel Kennedy. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Neue Meister

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Classical - Released March 16, 2018 | Oehms Classics

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This album, some of which was recorded live, marks the first concert performance of the young Thai-German violinist Iskandar Widjaja in the hall of the Berlin Philharmonic. Born in Berlin in 1986, Widjaja is a star in Indonesia. Here he is accompanied by the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, conducted by Christoph Eschenbach, who has a reliable eye for new talent. A programme dedicated to Robert Schumann with his little-played Phantasie in C Major Op. 131, written in 1853 for violinist Joseph Joachim. The piece was tinkered with first by Joachim himself, and then by Fritz Kreisler, before finally being published in its correct form in 1887 by Clara Schumann and Brahms, and then again in 1960, in a version rather closer to the original. The great work of this programme is the Sonata n° 2 in D Minor Op. 121 which benefits here from the polished playing of Christoph Eschenbach, this time on the piano. A sonata of symphonic dimensions in four movements, it is written in the style of Beethoven's "Kreutzer Sonata", and possesses the latter's depth and breath of the romantic. But don't be fooled: it is all Schumann, and his very best. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 1, 2014 | Oehms Classics

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Chamber Music - Released September 6, 2011 | Oehms Classics

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Bach 'n' Blues, an Oehms Classics album featuring young violinist Iskandar Widjaja, is a representation of Widjaja's respect for both classical traditions as well the impact of pop musical culture. To that end, Widjaja juxtaposes the Chaconne from J.S. Bach's D minor Partita and Biber's Passacaglia for solo violin (representing tradition) alongside Poulenc's simultaneously savage and delicate Violin Sonata and Ravel's groundbreaking Violin Sonata whose second movement incorporates the blues. Whether or not these latter two works are still representative of the innovative "pop" of classical music is questionable, but the combination with Biber and Bach does indeed provide listeners with some interesting and welcome contrasts. Widjaja's playing is fiery and vigorous, hallmarks of youthful intensity. Sometimes this passion gets the better of Widjaja and crosses the line into recklessness and brashness. This works fairly well in the outer movements of Poulenc and the Perpetuum mobile of the Ravel, although Widjaja sometimes leaves his pianist, Anastassiya Dranchuk, in the dust. What's lacking in his playing at this point is simplicity and delicacy, and most of all the ability to play a line just as it is without the need to greatly alter its rhythm or tempo. The Bach is excessively muscular and forceful where intimacy and spaciousness would be preferred. Widjaja is certainly a talented artist who, with some time and maturation, could certainly be one to watch. In this album, however, he's not quite there. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | RAR marketed by Motor Entertainment