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Alternative & Indie - Released March 22, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

Fifteen years after its first release in March 2004, Our Endless Numbered Days has re-emerged in all its splendour, this time in Deluxe edition. In 2002, the album The Creek Drank The Cradle introduced us to the subtleties of Iron & Wine’s music and the mastermind behind it, Sam Beam, a small, bearded genius in a shirt from South Carolina. This second album is more masterfully composed and features eight previously unreleased demos for the hard-core fans. Beam is in a league of his own with his soft rhythms, excellent command of vocal harmonies and innate sense of melody, like a kind of American descendant of Nick Drake. His folk music is still delicate and timeless as ever in Naked As We Came and even more so in the crown jewel of the album Sunset Soon Forgotten and it focuses on affairs of the heart more so than the music that Iron & Wine would later record. Even though this was a debut album from his youth, it was incredibly mature. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 23, 2004 | Sub Pop Records

On Our Endless Numbered Days, the follow-up to 2002's stunningly good Creek Drank the Cradle, the sound of Iron & Wine has changed but the song remains the same. No longer does Sam Beam record his intimate songs in the intimate surroundings of his home. Instead he has made the jump to the recording studio. As a result the record is much cleaner, less cocoon-like, certainly more the product of someone who has become a professional musician and not someone who just records for fun on a four-track. However, all Beam has sacrificed is sound quality. The sound of the record is still very intimate and simple, with very subtle arrangements that leave his voice and lyrics as the focal point. Luckily all the technology in the world can't affect Beam's voice, which still sounds like it comes right from his lips into your ear as if he were an angel perched on your shoulder. His songs are still as strong and memorable as they were on Creek, no drop off whatsoever in quality. "Naked as We Came" with sparkling melody lovely background harmonies by his sister Sarah; the aching folk ballad "Radio War," which wouldn't sound out of place on Prairie Home Companion, only it would be the best thing you ever heard there; the sad and sweet "Each Coming Night"; the crystalline acoustic guitar ballad "Fever Dream," which has the kind of vocal harmony between Beam and his sister that seems to be the exclusive domain of siblings; and the soft rock CSNY "Sodom, South Georgia" are the equal of anything on Iron & Wine's debut and match up well with anything Palace, Smog, or their ilk have done lately. A definite plus to recording in a studio and enlisting the help of outside musicians is that there is much more variety to the album and there are lots of small production touches that liven things up like the Native American chants at the close of "Cinder and Smoke," the pedal steel guitar on "Sunset Soon Forgotten," and the drums and tambourine on the bluesy "Free Until They Cut Me Down." Our Endless Numbered Days is very subdued, thoughtful, melodic, and downright beautiful album and the new sound is more of a progression than a sudden shift in values, production or otherwise. Anyone who found the first album to be wonderful will no doubt feel the same about this one. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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This EP takes over where 2017's album Beast Epic left off: and that's because its six tracks come from the same recording session. Sam Beam had said that he'd be back a year later with a nice surprise. And, as promised, here is an earthy record that cuts a shining path through the undergrowth. With this romantic EP, Iron & Wine is staying faithful to folk ballads and floaty choruses. It's a plunge into the ensemble's more or less misty memories. Iron & Wine's name has never fit so well.Taking on some painful subjects in a sublime state of semi-drunkenness, Waves of Galveston returns to the tragic event of 1900 when the Texan town was devastated by a hurricane. Over a simple folk melody, Sam Beam imagines, a century later, the catastrophe and the calm after the storm. There's a moving description of the scene, made marvellous by its easy singing ("There's a graveyard by the pizza parlor" / "Papa left you for Heaven after your Mama lost her song"). The American songwriter has a gift for sharpening emotion without falling into florid overwriting. Psychedelic folk ballads against a moderate groove (What Hurts Worse) and some very cool folk (Last of Your Rock 'n' Roll Heroes) rub shoulders with more serious cello strains and tinkling pianos (Milkweed). With Weed Garden, Iron & Wine will seduce fans thanks to a rich and delicate poetry shot through with optimism. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

This EP takes over where 2017's album Beast Epic left off: and that's because its six tracks come from the same recording session. Sam Beam had said that he'd be back a year later with a nice surprise. And, as promised, here is an earthy record that cuts a shining path through the undergrowth. With this romantic EP, Iron & Wine is staying faithful to folk ballads and floaty choruses. It's a plunge into the ensemble's more or less misty memories. Iron & Wine's name has never fit so well.Taking on some painful subjects in a sublime state of semi-drunkenness, Waves of Galveston returns to the tragic event of 1900 when the Texan town was devastated by a hurricane. Over a simple folk melody, Sam Beam imagines, a century later, the catastrophe and the calm after the storm. There's a moving description of the scene, made marvellous by its easy singing ("There's a graveyard by the pizza parlor" / "Papa left you for Heaven after your Mama lost her song"). The American songwriter has a gift for sharpening emotion without falling into florid overwriting. Psychedelic folk ballads against a moderate groove (What Hurts Worse) and some very cool folk (Last of Your Rock 'n' Roll Heroes) rub shoulders with more serious cello strains and tinkling pianos (Milkweed). With Weed Garden, Iron & Wine will seduce fans thanks to a rich and delicate poetry shot through with optimism. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 23, 2019 | Sub Pop Records