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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1991 | Geffen*

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
3 Stars - Good - "..a long and sinister orchestral collection which captures the mood of the film.." © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 13, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 21, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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For this third and final part of The Lord of the Rings (released in 2003 and adapted from Tolkien’s famous book), Howard Shore once again benefited from the exceptional opportunity to create 3h50m of music, which covers 90% of the film! Other than the London Philharmonic Orchestra, there is a wide variety of choirs and prestigious soloists. The latter are sometimes even actors in the films: The Green Dragon is an Irish-inspired tune, performed by the actor Billy Boyd, a.k.a. Pippin. Other soloists (both actors and not) include the famous flautist James Galway, as well as Viggo Mortensen and Renée Fleming. All three are present in The Fellowship Reunited.On the instrumental side of things, we hear several leitmotifs, some of which are already known (and sometimes developed), others completely new. One of the most beautiful phrases related to the ring appears in the first track, Roots and Beginnings, and evokes Richard Wagner's own ring theme from the opera Der Ring des Nibelungen. The simplicity of this short melodic phrase (only nine notes long) shows that Howard Shore wanted to personify the ring and not the stakes that it represents. Far from the strange calm of this music, we also encounter more epic, even horrific pieces, such as the amazing Shelob's Lair. Howard Shore is David Cronenberg's appointed composer, and in this respect, an undeniable specialist in the field. Finally, it’s worth listening to the majestic song Into the West as the closing credits roll, with Annie Lennox on mic. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 7, 2006 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Howard Shore’s themes for Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy are often considered as some of the greatest accomplishments in the history of movie soundtracks. By virtue of its operatic length, first: just for this second volume (available here in its entirety), the listener can enjoy this music for more than three hours! But first and foremost, we have to highlight here the extremely rich and inventive artistic performance of the composer of the movies of David Cronenberg, as well as Ed Wood, After Hours and Mrs. Doubtfire. For this second episode released in 2002 (called The Two Towers), the Canadian composer reuses here and there the epic and moving themes from the first volume, by injecting into them more darkness and ambiguity, as proven by the opening track (Glamdring, with Maori choruses), as well as tracks associated to Gollum that skillfully blend shadow and light (My Precious). This soundtrack is also filled with new themes like the one, epic and majestic, devoted to the Rohirrim, the riders of Middle-earth (The Plains of Rohan). But Shore’s score wouldn’t be complete without this Celtic flavor that the composer scatters with subtlety throughout this titanic partition—thus reminding that one of the influences of Tolkien, the author of the novels, was Irish mythology. Dermot Crehan (violin) and the great flutist James Galway (tin and low whistle) are usually responsible for bringing to this score this particular color (Edoras ; Ent-draught). In this regard, it is worth noting the impressive number of soloists inside Shore’s partition, something quite rare for a so-called “symphonic” partition. Naturally, throughout his work, the composer endeavors to respect to the letter the narrative and visual world of Tolkien and Jackson, thus intending it for the fans of the saga. But this rich and subtle original soundtrack proves in a blatant way that Howard Shore also wanted to speak to the heart of every music lover, whether they knew Tolkien’s fantastical world or not. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 13, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 11, 2012 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 13, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 23, 2014 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 7, 2006 | Rhino - Warner Records

Howard Shore’s themes for Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy are often considered as some of the greatest accomplishments in the history of movie soundtracks. By virtue of its operatic length, first: just for this second volume (available here in its entirety), the listener can enjoy this music for more than three hours! But first and foremost, we have to highlight here the extremely rich and inventive artistic performance of the composer of the movies of David Cronenberg, as well as Ed Wood, After Hours and Mrs. Doubtfire. For this second episode released in 2002 (called The Two Towers), the Canadian composer reuses here and there the epic and moving themes from the first volume, by injecting into them more darkness and ambiguity, as proven by the opening track (Glamdring, with Maori choruses), as well as tracks associated to Gollum that skillfully blend shadow and light (My Precious). This soundtrack is also filled with new themes like the one, epic and majestic, devoted to the Rohirrim, the riders of Middle-earth (The Plains of Rohan).But Shore’s score wouldn’t be complete without this Celtic flavor that the composer scatters with subtlety throughout this titanic partition—thus reminding that one of the influences of Tolkien, the author of the novels, was Irish mythology. Dermot Crehan (violin) and the great flutist James Galway (tin and low whistle) are usually responsible for bringing to this score this particular color (Edoras ; Ent-draught). In this regard, it is worth noting the impressive number of soloists inside Shore’s partition, something quite rare for a so-called “symphonic” partition. Naturally, throughout his work, the composer endeavors to respect to the letter the narrative and visual world of Tolkien and Jackson, thus intending it for the fans of the saga. But this rich and subtle original soundtrack proves in a blatant way that Howard Shore also wanted to speak to the heart of every music lover, whether they knew Tolkien’s fantastical world or not. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 22, 1995 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 10, 2013 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 5, 2006 | New Line Records

For 2006's gritty Departed, director Martin Scorsese, instead of deftly balancing the film's score with selections from the his notoriously large jukebox of jazz, rock, pop, and country tunes as he has done in the past with both Goodfellas and Gangs of New York, split the two into separate releases, allowing fans the option of experiencing composer Howard Shore's moody, guitar-heavy soundtrack without the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, or Badfinger there to break the vibe. Shore is as adaptable as always, crafting an urban landscape littered with dissonant strings, gently plucked classical guitars, and feedback that comes and goes like the ebb and flow of the public transit system. From tango to the blues, Shore paints Boston as the multicultural Petri dish it is, shadowing Scorsese's tale of cops and corruption like a willing participant rather than a fish-out-of-water bystander. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca Soundtracks

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 10, 2013 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 13, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2000 | Why Not Productions

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Soundtracks - Released June 29, 2010 | eOne Music

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse marked another upgrade for the franchise: director David Slade and composer Howard Shore possessed the skills to emphasize the horror and action in the saga’s third volume, which was arguably the best book in Stephenie Meyer's series. At any rate, it was rich with material for Slade and Shore to sink their directorial and musical fangs into, including the vampire army Victoria creates to take down Bella Swan and the Cullen family; the origins of Rosalie and Jasper; and Bella’s final decision on whether she’s Team Edward or Team Jacob (Shore's resigned-sounding piano piece “Jacob Black” offers some clues). However, most of the score is powerful, even muscular, suggesting that a lot more than broken hearts might be at stake in this film. Shore signals danger through echoing guitars and galloping drums, most strikingly on “Riley” and “Victoria,” with the drama and dread befitting a vampire on the warpath. He suggests character depth and development on “Rosalie,” a virtual mini-score for her origin story, and on the moody, subdued “Jasper.” The subtlety that runs through this track and “Imprinting,” “They’re Coming Here,” and “Wolf Scent” underscores that Eclipse is the most grown-up Twilight story yet. And when Shore returns to the emotional angst at the heart of this vampire-human-werewolf love story, he doesn’t wallow in it. Bella’s music is sweet but not saccharine, with crisp electric guitar providing an edge to the warm pianos on “Compromise/Bella’s Theme.” Likewise, the romantic themes “First Kiss” and “The Kiss” are sweeping without being flowery. Shore also provides The Twilight Saga with its first unabashedly happy-sounding piece: “Wedding Plans,” which closes the album by seguing into Metric's “Eclipse (All Yours),” allows a little sun to sparkle on the film’s happy ending. The most restrained yet majestic Twilight music yet, Shore's Eclipse score brings a surprising amount of dignity to this pop culture phenomenon. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 11, 2005 | New Line Records

The crime thriller A History of Violence, which concerns a Midwestern diner proprietor who may have a dark past revealed when he skillfully foils a robbery attempt, marks the 11th collaboration between director David Cronenberg and composer Howard Shore, who first got together early in their careers for The Brood (1979) and have also produced such disturbing works as Scanners (1980), Videodrome (1983), Dead Ringers (1988), and Crash (1996). Shore, meanwhile, became a mainstream Hollywood composer whose other scores include The Silence of the Lambs, Mrs. Doubtfire, Philadelphia, and the Academy Award-winning Lord of the Rings trilogy. For A History of Violence, he re-enters the decidedly weird world of Cronenberg, but he has provided a subtle, textured score that responds to the film's elements of doubt and internal conflict. Even though there are tracks here called "Run" and "Violence," he has not, for the most part, been called upon to underscore the action sequences. (In addition to the dramatic "Run," a notable exception is the portentous "Diner," accompanying the robbery scene.) Instead, this is minor key music taken at slow tempos, giving a continuing sense of uneasiness, but little resolution until the end. In his liner notes, Shore writes that the orchestration emphasizes the duality of the main character's nature, a duality between good and evil, "as the French horn and alto flute solos play duets with and against each other." Listeners are not likely to recognize this conflict between musical instruments or the composer's symbolism, though the conception no doubt helped him write. But it is worth noting that the French horn and the alto flute seem to be getting along well by the time the track "Ending" comes along, suggesting that the main character's dual nature has been resolved. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 11, 2012 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1993 | Varese Sarabande