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Rock - Released September 26, 2005 | Kobalt Music Recordings

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Rock - Released January 29, 2009 | Kobalt Music Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 7, 2007 | Kobalt Music Recordings

H.I.M.'s eighth album finds them toning down the atmospherics and sheen that were prominent on Dark Light in an attempt to make their heaviest album yet. According to frontman Ville Valo, the ultimate goal was to concoct a sound that combined My Bloody Valentine's Loveless with Metallica's Master of Puppets, and while Venus Doom doesn't quite meet such a lofty goal, it finds them back on track and sounding more metal than ever. There's less ear candy and more prominent riffs in the mix, and some subtle keyboard padding and studio buffing, but the bludgeoning drop-tuned guitars dominate throughout. It's a bigger and badder version of H.I.M. than in the past, and it's largely due to producer Tim Palmer (Ozzy Osbourne, Dredg). Just as the sound of the band has matured, Valo's voice has improved over time, and he experiments with a lower guttural range that fits the mood perfectly. The trademark gloom is as evident as ever within the lyrics and, as always, you can expect to hear the words "suffering," "blood," "misery," and "death" peppered liberally throughout the songs. Of course with lines like, "my heart's a graveyard, baby, and to evil we make love," H.I.M. isn't a band known for profound lyrics, but, at the same time, most fans of the band don't want to philosophize, they want to hear the group rock out, and this release shows them doing precisely that, even harder than before. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 10, 2006 | Bubble Core

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Rock - Released December 3, 2010 | Kobalt Music Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 26, 2005 | Kobalt Music Recordings

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Rock - Released November 30, 2009 | Kobalt Music Recordings

Finnish Goth rockers His Infernal Majesty's seventh studio album was built around one of pop music’s most ubiquitous themes: heartache. Breakups have been throwing artists into alternating fits of feverish work and hopeless despondency since time immemorial, resulting in both great works and self-absorbed descents into bloated narcissism. Screamworks: Love in Theory and Practice is a little bit of both. The group’s penchant for melodramatic, late-'80s/early-'90s melodic alt-rock in the vein of New Model Army, Dream Theater, and Mission serves as an efficient, yet predictable vehicle to deliver the primal scream that is heartbreak, and songs like In "Venere Veritas," "Heartkiller," and "Katherine Wheel" deliver the goods with solid hooks and appropriate gravitas. That said, there are more than a few embarrassing moments to be found (lyrics like “the promise of heaven, pushed us right back to hell/turned three sevens, back to three sixes again” would be better left in the tear-stained, spiral notebook where they originated), and the sheer weight of the material will be lost on those for whom love is currently showering with drinks, but overall, the material sits within the band’s canon well enough to please longtime fans, and listeners looking for some kind of middle ground between Evanescence, late-period Queensrÿche and Fall Out Boy will more than likely find a few wicked gems to hang their heads to. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2007 | Kobalt Music Recordings

H.I.M.'s eighth album finds them toning down the atmospherics and sheen that were prominent on Dark Light in an attempt to make their heaviest album yet. According to frontman Ville Valo, the ultimate goal was to concoct a sound that combined My Bloody Valentine's Loveless with Metallica's Master of Puppets, and while Venus Doom doesn't quite meet such a lofty goal, it finds them back on track and sounding more metal than ever. There's less ear candy and more prominent riffs in the mix, and some subtle keyboard padding and studio buffing, but the bludgeoning drop-tuned guitars dominate throughout. It's a bigger and badder version of H.I.M. than in the past, and it's largely due to producer Tim Palmer (Ozzy Osbourne, Dredg). Just as the sound of the band has matured, Valo's voice has improved over time, and he experiments with a lower guttural range that fits the mood perfectly. The trademark gloom is as evident as ever within the lyrics and, as always, you can expect to hear the words "suffering," "blood," "misery," and "death" peppered liberally throughout the songs. Of course with lines like, "my heart's a graveyard, baby, and to evil we make love," H.I.M. isn't a band known for profound lyrics, but, at the same time, most fans of the band don't want to philosophize, they want to hear the group rock out, and this release shows them doing precisely that, even harder than before. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released June 15, 1997 | WordSound Recordings

Interpretive Belief System is an extraordinary confluence of scattershot percussion, hip-hop attitude and dub vibes from the starter "Port of Entry" to the excellent closer "Second Chance." © Keith Farley /TiVo