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Film Soundtracks - Released October 2, 2019 | WaterTower Music

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While bringing the characters from DC Comics to life, director Todd Philips uses Joker to confront real-world problems - particularly how neglected, bullied individuals are treated in Western societies. The Joker (played by Joaquin Phoenix) suffers from mental illness and lives with his mother in a squalid apartment. After being abandoned by Gotham City Social Services he gradually turns into a psychotic killer, murdering three men who represent the elite and becoming a hero for a handful of rejected and forgotten citizens. In a highly stylised yet nevertheless realistic context, the Joker’s intrusion into the world of superheroes is reflected in the film’s soundtrack. The music is characterised by striking contrasts, with feel-good retro songs on the one hand and extremely dark non-diegetic music on the other. Composed by the Icelandic cellist Hildur Guðnadóttir, Joker’s soundtrack revolves around threatening percussion and layers of deep, throbbing strings (contrasting against the higher-pitched ones in Charlie Chaplin’s song Smile). Occasionally, a choir appears in the soundtrack, acting as a common link between the two atmospheres. Some of the highlights of the soundtrack include Defeated Clown and Following Sophie, two tracks which are wrapped around a persistent drum pattern. Other gems include the heartbreaking Subway, the staccato strings in Penny Taken to the Hospital and the moving, triumphant climax Call Me Joker. A unique and passionate soundtrack by a woman who some consider to be the successor to the late Johann Johannsson. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 31, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The main challenge that composer (and cellist) Hildur Guðnadóttir faced in writing the soundtrack for Chernobyl was musically recreating the 1986 nuclear disaster (the subject of the five-part HBO mini-series). How does one find a sound for such a destructive force that is both invisible and silent? Instead of using the tragic or threatening strings which are often employed in this kind of story, the Icelandic composer (who also wrote the soundtrack for Joker) crafted a unique texture which is both enchanting and incredibly unnerving. The musician spent an entire day in a Lithuanian nuclear power plant so as to listen to and record the sounds of the site and its surroundings. Turbines, pumps and Geiger counters (which were of course reworked in the studio) form the basis for the series’ score. Chernobyl’s soundtrack hardly features any “traditional” instruments, apart from Hildur Guðnadóttir’s own voice on some of the pieces (Clean Up, Líður), as well as the Homin Lviv Municipal Choir on Vichnaya Pamyat, which adds a small dose of humanity and hope to the grey, anxiety-inducing soundscape. Guðnadóttir’s aim was to make you almost feel the radioactivity and, in the case of Chernobyl, its harmful consequences. Having succeeded in doing just that, it’s no wonder she won an Emmy Award at the Creative Arts Emmys 2019. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 9, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 29, 2018 | Varese Sarabande Records

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Classical - Released March 30, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 31, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

The main challenge that composer (and cellist) Hildur Guðnadóttir faced in writing the soundtrack for Chernobyl was musically recreating the 1986 nuclear disaster (the subject of the five-part HBO mini-series). How does one find a sound for such a destructive force that is both invisible and silent? Instead of using the tragic or threatening strings which are often employed in this kind of story, the Icelandic composer (who also wrote the soundtrack for Joker) crafted a unique texture which is both enchanting and incredibly unnerving. The musician spent an entire day in a Lithuanian nuclear power plant so as to listen to and record the sounds of the site and its surroundings. Turbines, pumps and Geiger counters (which were of course reworked in the studio) form the basis for the series’ score. Chernobyl’s soundtrack hardly features any “traditional” instruments, apart from Hildur Guðnadóttir’s own voice on some of the pieces (Clean Up, Líður), as well as the Homin Lviv Municipal Choir on Vichnaya Pamyat, which adds a small dose of humanity and hope to the grey, anxiety-inducing soundscape. Guðnadóttir’s aim was to make you almost feel the radioactivity and, in the case of Chernobyl, its harmful consequences. Having succeeded in doing just that, it’s no wonder she won an Emmy Award at the Creative Arts Emmys 2019. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 30, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 27, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 9, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 5, 2020 | Milan

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Classical - Released May 7, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 27, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 24, 2019 | Milan

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 3, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 3, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Hildur Guðnadóttir in the magazine