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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1971 | Rhino

Flutist Herbie Mann opened up his music on this date for Push Push (and during the era) toward R&B, rock and funk music. The results were generally appealing, melodic and danceable. On such songs as "What's Going On," "Never Can Say Goodbye," "What'd I Say" and the title cut, Mann utilizes an impressive crew of musicians, which include guitarist Duane Allman and keyboardist Richard Tee. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino Atlantic

At the Village Gate is the album that first brought Herbie Mann to widespread popular attention, thanks to the inclusion of "Comin' Home Baby," which soon became one of the flautist's signature songs. By the time of the record's release in 1962, however, Mann had already been a bandleader for years, honing his pioneering blend of Afro-Cuban and Brazilian music with hard bop's funky structures just under the public radar. As a result, At the Village Gate sounds more like a summation than a beginning. The nearly 40-minute album is a mere three tracks long, with an epic 20-minute version of "It Ain't Necessarily So" taking up the entirety of the second side of the original vinyl. The highlight, however, is a stunning take on the standard "Summertime," one that turns the Gershwin tune into an easy swinging, proto-bossa nova song that features a glorious extended solo by Mann over a conga beat. In its way, it's just as revelatory as Miles Davis' better-known recasting of the tune. © TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 15, 1987 | Rhino Atlantic

Herbie Mann has always been open to new trends in his music. For this 1969 studio session, he and three other top soloists (vibraphonist Roy Ayers and guitarists Larry Coryell and Sonny Sharrock) went down to Memphis and combined their talents with a topnotch local rhythm section. The music effectively mixes R&B and country rhythms with the lead jazz voices, although the material, which includes "Memphis Underground," "Hold On! I'm Comin'," and "Chain of Fools," is rather weak. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 19, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

Although it followed a formula similar to the hugely successful Memphis Underground, Muscle Shoals Nitty Gritty stands on its own as a superb example of the fusion of jazz with '60s soul music, a genre that Herbie Mann stood atop at the time of its release. In addition to Mann band members Roy Ayers, Miroslav Vitous and Bruno Carr, the recording employs the Muscle Shoals rhythm section that had played together on numerous soul hits of the '60s, including those of Aretha Franklin. Standout cuts include the title track, with the its horn-driven groove; Sharrock's "Blind Willy," featuring a jew's-harp hook; and a smoldering version of Lennon & McCartney's "Come Together." Throughout the album, Mann's solos wail through the upper register of the flute, while Ayers finds interestingly funky passages on the vibes. © Jim Newsom /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Rather than play a watered-down version of bossa nova in New York studios (which was becoming quite common as the bossa nova fad hit its peak in 1962), flutist Herbie Mann went down to Brazil and recorded with some of the top players of the style. Guitarist Baden Powell and the group of then-unknown pianist Sergio Mendes, which included drummer Dom Um Romao, formed the nucleus for this generally delightful album. Antonio Carlos Jobim himself dropped by to sing two of his compositions, including "One Note Samba," and even on the token jazz standard "Blues Walk," the music is as much Brazilian as it is jazz. This "fusion" works quite well; pity that the performances last appeared on this out-of-print LP. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

By 1961, flutist Herbie Mann was really starting to catch on with the general public. This release, a follow-up to his hit At the Village Gate (two songs are from the same gig while three others actually date from seven months earlier), features Mann in an ideal group with either Hagood Hardy or Dave Pike on vibes, Ahmed Abdul-Malik or Nabil Totah on bass, drummer Rudy Collins and two percussionists. Mann really cooks on four of his own originals, plus "Bags' Groove," blending in the influence of African, Afro-Cuban and even Brazilian jazz. Worth searching for. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

This two-disc anthology doesn't cover Mann's bop or swing origins, instead concentrating on Mann's evolution from the 1960s to the 1990s. The first disc has more interest for jazz fans; it includes the influential "Memphis Underground" and "Coming Home Baby," showing his early flirtations with Latin and African music, as well as live workouts and Southern sessions. The second disc documents Mann's move into straight pop and light instrumentals, although near its conclusion he's returned to the groove-oriented Afro-Latin music of his earlier days. While there are questionable inclusions, especially the inferior live version of "Hold On I'm Comin'" rather than the definitive rendition from Memphis Underground, this set offers a good overview of a controversial but consistent musician. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 19, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released February 25, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

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Jazz - Released October 1, 2011 | Stardust Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

After adding Cuban-born conguero Carlos "Patato" Valdes to his backing group on the recommendation of jazz DJ Sid Torin, Herbie Mann mounted a State Department-sponsored tour of Africa that further expanded his musical horizons -- Flautista!, recorded live at New York City's Basin Street East in June 1959, captures the flutist's deepening immersion in global rhythms and harmonies, documenting a pan-cultural jazz aesthetic that points the way for the myriad world music efforts that followed in its wake. Favoring a subtle, thoughtful combination of bebop melodies and Afro-Cuban rhythms, the group -- also including Valdes, vibraphonist Johnny Rae, bassist Knobby Totah, and percussionists Santos Miranda and Luis Mangual -- delivers a beautifully light yet hypnotically insistent performance that suffers from none of the awkwardness endemic among these kinds of early fusion efforts. Mann even detours to the Far East for a cool, graceful rendition of the exotica staple "Caravan." Verve's 1998 reissue appends a pair of unreleased cuts, "Delilah" and "Basin Street Este." © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

On this out of print LP, flutist Herbie Mann performs 11 songs from a famous Leslie Bricusse-Anthony Newley musical. Joined by an orchestra arranged by Ray Ellis (and including either Chick Corea or Roger Kellaway on piano), Mann plays well enough. However, the only one of the 11 songs remembered today is "Who Can I Turn To," and the renditions of the material are so brief (only two songs are longer than three minutes) as to be unadventurous and rather superficial. One of Mann's less significant projects of the '60s. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 28, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

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