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Contemporary Jazz - Released April 14, 2015 | JMS

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Contemporary Jazz - Released May 26, 2017 | Label Bleu

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released March 4, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 28, 2020 | Label Bleu

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Taking frequent trips to Henri Texier’s inspirational planet is sensible and an absolute necessity. Texier is one of France’s most respected bass players and this hot new album is here to remind us that his music is like a marketplace, full of life and people. The album features the musician’s long-term friends and collaborators (Sébastien Texier, Vincent Lê Quang, Manu Codjia, and Gautier Garrigue). It also touches on many of the themes and values that he cherishes, as shown in the songs’ symbolic titles (Cinecitta, Simone et Robert - for Simone Veil and Robert Badinter, and Pina B - for Pina Bausch). The album is entitled Chance (Luck) and for Texier it is about being lucky: “Lucky for being here today, for having played with so many marvelous musicians, for having shared so much with inspired artists who trusted me and taught me their arts. Lucky for having had enough energy to feel the freedom, excitement, weightlessness, and fullness of jazz music. Lucky for always keeping a warm and dedicated audience around me. Lucky for having been able to conduct my artistic projects freely, in particular those recorded, filmed, photographed, and illustrated by Philippe Teissier du Cros, Guy Le Querrec, and Christophe Rémy. Lucky for having been able to work with Sébastien Texier, Vincent Lê Quang, Manu Codjia (insanely good on Cinecitta!), and Gautier Garrigue. They are all brilliant and inspired musicians—thanks to whom I can still explore the new territories of this rich and emotional music. Lucky, finally, for having, after all these years, only very few regrets.” Is everything said? Not totally. The listener will also be lucky. Lucky to spend 54 minutes immersed in this plural and collective jazz trip. Henri Texier is a musician even more than a bass player and he thinks of his music as such, with a true sense of narrative. Exquisite. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 2, 2018 | Label Bleu

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More active than ever, Henri Texier plays around with revisiting the past. With Sand Woman, the double bass player mostly sifts through his recordings from the 70s, his JMS Records era. With a quintet as inspired as ever, composed of guitarist Manu Codjia (impressive in his improvisations), drummer Gauthier Garrigue, saxophonists Vincent Lê Quang and his son Sébastien, he revisits his old themes like Amir and Les là-bas. Also on the menu of this celebration of exploration and bifurcation, there are more recent compositions. But the result is still very consistent, as Texier remains a leader who always ensures that his accomplices express themselves. At last, Sand Woman will also remind you that the man is a great composer (Hungry Man) as well as a great sound producer (the ten-minute long Indians). © MZ/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 5, 2016 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1977 | JMS

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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 1, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 1, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released June 24, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | JMS

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Contemporary Jazz - Released June 24, 2013 | Label Bleu

This is a new band, but hardly a departure for the French bassist. Save for his son, he has revamped his ensemble, which is now known as the piano-less Strada Sextet. His compositions, however, still bear his inimitable signature and continue to reflect his political stance. Revolt is a recurring theme, and certain titles clearly show on what side of the spectrum he stands; "Gandhi," penned by guitarist Manu Codjia, and "Blues for L. Peltier," which is dedicated to the imprisoned Native American activist, are unambiguous indicators. The latter is the perfect soundtrack to a protest march before it evolves into an Indian dance that brings a sense of optimism. "Old Delhi" opens with a glimpse of Texier at his best, and he elicits some scorching contributions from his sidemen, particularly saxophonist François Corneloup, trombonist Guéorgui Kornazov, and Codjia. Elsewhere, the leader's determination and renewed aggression are insufficient to mask a certain lack of inspiration or inability to renew himself. Interestingly enough, the real novelty emerges from the pieces written by the new bandmembers; usually more abstract than Texier's, these tunes are so short that they suggest a reluctance by the leader to delegate compositional duties. Such criticism should not alter the viewpoint that this is a fine recording that might represent a transition for the leader, a primer for future developments. © Alain Drouot /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1979 | JMS

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Contemporary Jazz - Released June 24, 2013 | Label Bleu

Recorded in the mid-'90s, Mad Nomad(s) reaffirms Henri Texier's presence on the French scene. The playing and compositions are remarkable throughout and display a lot of variety, all the tunes being performed in various groupings but mainly by a septet with a strong and young saxophone front line. Texier's own "Dezarwa" is a tribute to drummer Art Taylor's own brand of hard bop. Drummer Tony Rabeson's "Radio Bo" is given a more relaxed and less-boppish treatment than on pianist Bojan Zulfikarpasic's Koreni. Homage is paid to free jazz with a powerful rendition of Ornette Coleman's "Happy House," a composition which finds a natural home on this work. And guitarist Noël Akchoté's explosive "Blasted Rats" echoes the leader's outcry. In fact, the latter composition is here to remind listeners that Mad Nomad(s) is also a concept album -- Texier's reflection and statement on the issue of displaced people; it must be said that Texier's definition includes jazz musicians. As a consequence, the music has militant overtones. This also explains why the bassist uses elements of free jazz, a genre which, in the '60s in particular, carried substantial political and societal meaning. The program is also comprised of relatively short interludes dedicated to an oppressed community. For instance, "S.O.S. Tibet" features a Tibetan bell struggling to be heard among crashing Chinese gongs and cymbals. Mad Nomad(s), with its memorable and spirited tunes, can be considered one of the most accomplished endeavors by Henri Texier. © Alain Drouot /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 1, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | JMS Productions

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | JMS Productions

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 1, 2013 | Label Bleu