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Rock - Released October 25, 2010 | Noise Records

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Metal - Released March 5, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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The stalwart German outfit's 16th studio long player, My God-Given Right is a power metal cornucopia spilling over with commercial-grade sweets and cheeses. Bolstered by the dizzying guitar work of Michael Weikath and Sascha Gerstner, the 15-track set has some satisfying moments, especially early on with the one-two punch of "Heroes" and "Battles Won," both of which fit nicely into the Helloween canon where speed metal precision meets rich, melodic choruses tailor-made for unison fist pumping. Vocalist Andi Deris more than holds his own throughout, delivering often inane lyrics like "We wanna stay crazy, fresh as a daisy" with gusto, in a voice that falls somewhere between former Helloween frontman Michael Kiske and head Scorpion Klaus Meine. At 15 slabs of metal, My God-Given Right overstays its welcome a bit, with large portions of its latter half drifting dangerously into filler territory. But stand-out cuts like the soaring "Creatures in Heaven," the menacing "Swing of the Fallen World," and the aforementioned "Heroes" prove that, 30 years into their career, Helloween are still largely unequaled purveyors and unabashed champions of "cheese-tastic" power metal hymns. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Rock - Released September 1, 2016 | Noise Records

Crafting fast-paced power metal since their inception in the early '80s, Helloween has followed a very curious and unique path throughout their career. Releasing heady concept albums (the Keeper of the Seven Keys series) and complicated metal anthems while keeping their tongue firmly in cheek, the band managed to stay relevant in a stagnant genre by not being afraid to be different. This two-CD set showcases their career by mixing the tracks together from every point of their existence. This works because the sheer variety is complementary to their accomplishments, even if that variety is questionable when compared to less narrow genres. Still, they were always very catchy and memorable, and every important Helloween song imaginable to a casual fan makes an appearance here. Most importantly, the full 14-minute version of "Halloween" is included, and that song more than any other is a cult classic that has gained notoriety through MTV's insistence on playing the track on October 31st for years after the single's release. Their American debut, Walls of Jericho, is well represented through several excellent tracks, and their aforementioned Seven Keys albums also contribute a large amount of material. Those unfamiliar with the band may find it unusual that they obsess over weird things like proper names ("Dr. Stein," "Mr. Torture," "Mr. Ego") and have albums with titles like Pink Bubbles Go Ape. But that's the charm of Helloween: they don't have the overblown pomposity of Iron Maiden or oddball gimmicks like Running Wild, they just make solid power metal. This isn't for everybody, but one listen to "I Want Out" should remind fans old and new exactly why Helloween is good: they rocked. ~ Bradley Torreano
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Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Noise Records

Helloween followed up their very popular self-titled mini-LP with 1986's even more accomplished Walls of Jericho, a disc that saw the quartet from Hamburg, Germany, outperforming expectations and quickly defining their sonic identity. The instrumental title track soon gives way to amazingly mature and complex compositions like "Ride the Sky," "Phantoms of Death," and the awesome "How Many Tears" (even more ambitious 13-minute epics would soon follow). And although these were heavily reliant on Iron Maiden for inspiration, it was Helloween's speed metal innovations that clearly helped make the songs so special and influential for future bands. Even the album's lyrically challenged, somewhat one-dimensional moments ("Warrior," "Metal Invaders") usually succeed, thanks to the group's uncontainable energy. On the downside, the album continued to expose Kai Hansen's limitations as a singer, but the band would soon remedy this disadvantage by bringing on teenage phenom Michael Kiske as lead vocalist. [The CD reissue of Walls of Jericho offers a complete recap of Helloween's first incarnation by combining it with their eponymous mini-LP and the Judas EP in chronological order.] ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Noise Records

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Metal - Released October 4, 2019 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released July 7, 2008 | Noise Records

Influenced by Iron Maiden and Judas Priest, Helloween specialized in blistering yet melodic heavy metal with a strong gothic orientation. On Keeper of the Seven Keys, Pt. 1 (arguably Helloween's best album), lead vocalist Michael Kiske has no problem singing in a high, ear-splitting pitch -- often demonstrating just how great an impact Rob Halford has had on him. Although Helloween was never in a class with either Priest or Maiden, this very conceptual album is competent, enjoyable, and generally well done. There are no hormone-driven odes to women in tight dresses (a recurring theme in metal and hard rock) on Keeper; from "Future World" to "Twilight of the Gods," Helloween sticks to the type of gothic, fantasy-oriented lyrics it was known for. Helloween's contributions to metal were never outstanding, but as Keeper showcases, the band did have its moment. ~ Alex Henderson
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Metal - Released October 30, 2000 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released March 1, 2017 | Noise Records

Helloween followed up their very popular self-titled mini-LP with 1986's even more accomplished Walls of Jericho, a disc that saw the quartet from Hamburg, Germany, outperforming expectations and quickly defining their sonic identity. The instrumental title track soon gives way to amazingly mature and complex compositions like "Ride the Sky," "Phantoms of Death," and the awesome "How Many Tears" (even more ambitious 13-minute epics would soon follow). And although these were heavily reliant on Iron Maiden for inspiration, it was Helloween's speed metal innovations that clearly helped make the songs so special and influential for future bands. Even the album's lyrically challenged, somewhat one-dimensional moments ("Warrior," "Metal Invaders") usually succeed, thanks to the group's uncontainable energy. On the downside, the album continued to expose Kai Hansen's limitations as a singer, but the band would soon remedy this disadvantage by bringing on teenage phenom Michael Kiske as lead vocalist. [The CD reissue of Walls of Jericho offers a complete recap of Helloween's first incarnation by combining it with their eponymous mini-LP and the Judas EP in chronological order.] ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Metal - Released April 25, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released March 1, 2017 | Noise Records

The Best, the Rest, the Rare has a little bit of something for everybody. For the casual listener, there are hits and album tracks that provide the bare-bones introduction to Helloween. For the longtime fan, there's a handful of rare cuts that make the compilation worth hearing. For both the casual and the hardcore fan, the disc provides an excellent overview of Helloween's peak years. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 1, 2017 | Noise Records

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Rock - Released March 1, 2017 | Castle Communications

Seminal power metal gods Helloween appear to have gotten rather bored after their amazing last album, Better Than Raw, and hence laid down an album full of recordings by other musicians. They crank out Scorpions, Jethro Tull, Beatles, Faith No More, and Cream songs, among others. First the surprises and successes. ABBA's "Lay All Your Love on Me," as strange as that sounds, comes across as a power metal radio ballad that carries a certain appeal with it, while they pour forth "White Room" by Cream with amazing, psychedelic sounding success. When they cover prog rock favorite Focus, and their endearing instrumental hit, "Hocus Pocus," with utter craziness and convincing success (complete with yodeling), one can't help but wonder if they are partaking in too many '70s extracurricular activities. When David Bowie, oops, I mean Andi Deris, sings "Space Oddity," you get a creepy feeling, because Deris appears possessed by the spirit of the man from Mars himself. Most of the songs work; those failing are the Beatles' "All My Loving," "Faith Healer" by Alex Harvey Band, and a few others. This album is fun, but like Blind Guardian's Forgotten Tales, it is not essential to the average listener. So if you are a diehard or just a sucker for cover albums then pop your money in the Metal Jukebox, kick back with a beer, and enjoy the party. ~ Jason Hundey
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Pop/Rock - Released January 29, 2010 | Columbia Dragnet

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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released March 29, 2015 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released April 25, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released August 1, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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