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Alternative & Indie - Released March 8, 2019 | RVNG Intl.

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Considering how Private Energy positively beamed thanks to radiant songs like "It's My Brown Skin" and "Young, Latin and Proud," the title of Helado Negro's sixth album could come as a surprise. However, on This Is How You Smile, Roberto Carlos Lange finds ways to sustain a sense of identity, family, and love when that energy runs low. For these strong yet tender songs, Lange drew inspiration from Jamaica Kincaid's short story "Girl," in which an immigrant mother gives her daughter instructions on how to survive and thrive in a world that wasn't made for her. Lange's flair for imagery is just as deft as any author's: He sets the album's mood with "Please Won't Please," sounding weary but resilient as he sings "Lifelong history shows that brown won't go/Brown just glows" over a scuffed beat and luminous synths. On "Imagining What to Do," he sings of "waiting for the glow again," portraying joy, pride, and strength as resources that may flicker, but never fade away entirely. On these songs and throughout This Is How You Smile, Lange couples the evocative music at which he's always excelled with gorgeously insightful lyrics. He's grown into a subtly powerful songwriter over the years, and he's at the peak of his powers on "Pais Nublado," where the way its conversation between Spanish-speaking elders and English-speaking children flows adds to its poignancy. On "Running," he deals with these complicated and inescapable relationships with grace, setting his musings to a piano melody that's as warm and effortless as a sunbeam. The album's discourse includes not just the character's in Lange's songs, but Helado Negro's entire body of work. Along with shades of Private Energy, This Is How You Smile evokes the shadowy intimacy of Canta Lechuza and, on "Seen My Aura," the distant, sunny childhood memories of Double Youth. As always, the ambient side of Helado Negro's music is just as eloquent as Lange's songwriting, and interludes such as "Sabana de Luz" and the festive sounds of "My Real Name Is for My Friends" add to the album's hazy, lived-in warmth. While his advice to "take care of people today" on "Two Lucky" is the closest he gets to giving his listeners directives like Kincaid's, the sustenance Lange offers with these songs is more delicate than Private Energy's anthems, but just as necessary. A winning combination of his long-standing and more recently developed gifts, This Is How You Smile is a culmination of Helado Negro's work and completely relevant to when it was released. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 26, 2018 | RVNG Intl.

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 5, 2017 | RVNG Intl.

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Helado Negro's Roberto Carlos Lange has always honored his roots in his music, blending his Ecuadorian heritage with the diverse sounds he heard while growing up in Florida. This celebration feels even more vital on Private Energy, Lange's response to the politically charged climate of the late 2010s. Where previous Helado Negro albums seemed to exist just to capture fleeting moments of beauty, this time Lange trades blissful drifting for something more intentional. Just as his music is rooted in his heritage, he gives Private Energy solid foundations to withstand tumultuous times. "Tartamundo" is grounded by brassy synths and a driving but distant beat, while "Lengua Larga"'s driven fusion of synth-pop and funk signals the album's strength in subtle but unmistakable ways. When Lange gets explicitly political, the lightness of his music complements the gravity of the issues he's discussing, allowing his words to slide into listeners' ears and linger. One of the album's much-loved singles, "It's My Brown Skin," telegraphs its resiliency and pride with its buoyant beat; another, "Young Latin & Proud," sings the praises of heritage and "knowing you will be you for the rest of your life." Lange explores the complicated politics of relationships with as much eloquence, whether on "Transmission Listen"'s joyous making up or "Runaround"'s strength in tenderness. While there are plenty of reminders of Lange's carefree side, Private Energy introduces pressing issues into his work in ways that feel genuine, and the results prove to be some of his most complete and complex music yet. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 5, 2013 | Asthmatic Kitty

After Canta Lechuza's spacy experiments, it seemed like anything was possible for Helado Negro's third album. So it comes as something of a surprise -- though not an unpleasant one -- that Roberto Carlos Lange returns to the subversively tropical-sounding territory of Awe Owe for much of Invisible Life. Not that these songs are a rehash of where he's been before; instead, he expands on his debut's warmth and sensuality with tracks like "Arboles," which bounces along with a sunny, unhurried charm. Some of Canta Lechuza's fascination with old-school electronics creeps into two of the album's more expansive showcases for Lange's music: "Lentamente" lets bubbly tones ricochet off each other as the song rolls out over the course of six minutes, while "Junes" anchors its breezy sounds with a more propulsive, dance-inspired beat. Perhaps Invisible Life's biggest development is that Lange sings in English for about half of the album, which suits some of the more pop-oriented tracks here. "U Heard" evokes TV on the Radio's soulful electro-rock ballads, although its weightless feel is all Lange. "Catastrophe" proves that he can do concise synth pop as well as his more expected reveries, but it's the hypnotic pull of even his simplest songs, like the lonely and lovely "Dance Ghost," that makes his music special. Invisible Life reaffirms that Lange can keep that quality, regardless of which direction he takes Helado Negro in next. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 4, 2009 | Asthmatic Kitty

Summery in an unexpected way befitting a project whose name translates to "black ice cream," Awe Owe puts folk, jazz, electronic, and pop music through a distinctly Latin filter, reflecting Helado Negro main man Roberto Carlos Lange's Ecuadorian heritage and Miami upbringing. Lange is also a member of Savath & Savalas, joining that group for their 2009 album Llama, and both projects combine tradition with experimentalism in a way that sets off both sides of their sound -- and since Savath & Savalas and Prefuse 73's Guillermo Scott Herren appear here as well, it's easy to see Helado Negro as a part of an extended collaboration between him and Lange. However, Awe Owe has its own nimble yet intimate approach, flitting from the breezy, acoustic album-opener "Venceremos" to "Espuma Negra"'s hazy strumming to "I Wish"'s electronics and tumbling drums with an organic flow. Helado Negro also ranges from more live-sounding songs like the surreal ballad "Dos Sueños" to wispily layered creations such as "Dahum," which builds from a simple drum loop into something as transporting as anything by Panda Bear or El Guincho. Lange and company sound just as strong with either approach: "Awe," an elaborate tour through a jungle of playful keyboards and hypnotic percussion, and "Deja," the album's darkly strummed closer, couldn't be more different, but they're both standouts. Even though Helado Negro never really repeats itself, Awe Owe holds together wonderfully, offering an immediately engaging listening experience that only gets richer with each listen. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Asthmatic Kitty

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The dreamy soundworlds Roberto Carlos Lange created on Awe Owe and Invisible Life were steeped in a nostalgic haze that, in theory, seems like a perfect fit for Double Youth, which was inspired by a long-lost poster he discovered while cleaning out a closet in his childhood home. While Lange's fondness for gauzy sounds is definitely on display on his fourth album, it also features some of his most direct and funky songs yet. He conveys Double Youth's childlike essence with bouncy melodies and rhythms, like the hopscotching beat on "It's Our Game" and the playful swing of "Ojos Que No Ven," both of which embody youth rather than looking back on it longingly. Throughout the album, Lange moves between past and present -- "Myself on 2 U" and "That Shit Makes Me Sad" have a distinctly grown-up perspective -- and Spanish and English with a seamlessness that's all the more impressive for how effortless it sounds. "Friendly Arguments" and "Queriendo" give the drifting feel of Helado Negro's earlier work a more purposeful pulse, but Double Youth's standouts are remarkably streamlined. "I Krill You" gets listeners' attention with its echoing beats, heavy bass, and brassy coda; "Triangulate"'s wavering bassline nods in dubstep's general direction in a way that's more spellbinding than heavy-handed; and "Invisible Heartbeat" sets soulful harmonies afloat a rolling rhythm section. If this is the direction Lange takes on future Helado Negro albums, it's an exciting development indeed. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2013 | Asthmatic Kitty

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 10, 2011 | Asthmatic Kitty

Roberto Carlos Lange recorded his second Helado Negro album, Canta Lechuza, holed up in a rural Connecticut cabin, but it sounds like it could have been made in an orbiting space station for all that it has in common with where it was made. Actually, that would be a fitting explanation for the album’s playful, peaceful, and decidedly insular sound, which is a drastic change from the expansive collaborations of Helado Negro's debut Awe Owe; if anything, it has more in common with Asthmatic Kitty's library music series than their regular output. In splendid isolation with an arsenal of loops, samples, drum machines, live instruments, and synths at his disposal, Lange flexed his muscles as a sound-shaper, and the sonic trickery that decorated Awe Owe is Canta Lechuza's focus. Sounds drift, hover, and cruise from one stereo channel to another, making songs like “Globitos,” “Regresa,” and “20 Dia” ideal headphone listening. Meanwhile, the hypnotic pulse of “El Oeste” has more in common with Broadcast than Helado Negro's previous work, and “Oreja de Arena” offers a tropical twist on space age bachelor pad music. However, Lange doesn’t completely abandon his pop roots; a playful melody flits across “Obara Uno” when listeners are least expecting it, and “Lechuguilla”'s cheery sparkle and “Calculas”'s bounce are just as charming as anything from Awe Owe, despite sounding radically different from that album. Mysterious and subtly beguiling, Canta Lechuza begs to be listened to in the condition in which it was made: solitude. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2014 | Asthmatic Kitty

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 28, 2012 | Asthmatic Kitty